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FM 3-93 (FM 100-7)

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15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Theater Army Operations

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DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. The material in this manual is under development. It is not approved doctrine and cannot be used for reference or citation. The approved FM is current used for reference or citation until this draft is approved and authenticated. Upon publication, this manual will be approved for public release; distribution will be unlimited.

Headquarters Department of the Army

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Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Field Manual No. 3-93 (100-7)

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Theater Army Operations Draft—Not for Implementation

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Contents

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PREFACE ........................................................................................................... 1-1 PURPOSE ........................................................................................................... 1-1 SCOPE ................................................................................................................ 1-1 APPLICABILITY .................................................................................................. 1-2 ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION.................................................................... 1-2

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INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................... i

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Chapter 1

THEATER ARMY................................................................................................ 1-1 Service (Military Department) Responsibilities ................................................... 1-1 Army Operational Headquarters In An AOR ....................................................... 1-2 Redefining ARFOR Responsibilities ................................................................... 1-2 Theater Army as Army Service Component to a GCC ....................................... 1-6 Theater Army Enabling Commands/BDEs (TEC) ............................................... 1-7 Theater Army Commander ............................................................................... 1-11 Theater Army Headquarters Organization ........................................................ 1-12 Options For Forming A Joint Task Force Staff ................................................. 1-14 Training Implications ......................................................................................... 1-14

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Chapter 2

Theater Army Contingency Command Post Employment ............................ 2-1 Example Number 1: Operation Desert Shield ..................................................... 2-1 Employent Of Theater Army In Desert Shield And Similar Scenarios ................ 2-3 Example Number 2: Operation Assured Response—Liberian Neo ................... 2-4 Employent Of Theater Army In Operation Assured Response And Similar Scenarios ............................................................................................................ 2-5 Example Number 3: Hurricanes Georges And Mitch – Disaster Relief/ Foreign Humanitarian Assistance ....................................................................... 2-6

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Chapter 3

Theater Army Main Command Post Organization ......................................... 3-1

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Chapter 4

Theater Army Contingency Command Post Organization ........................... 4-3 CCP Roles & Missions ........................................................................................ 4-4 Capabilities .......................................................................................................... 4-4 Limitations ........................................................................................................... 4-5 Dependencies ..................................................................................................... 4-5 i

Contents

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Chapter 5

Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion ............................ 5-1

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Chapter 6

Theater Army Command Group ...................................................................... 6-2

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Chapter 7

Theater Army Personal Staff ........................................................................... 7-1

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Chapter 8

Theater Army Special Staff .............................................................................. 8-1

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Chapter 9

Theater Army Intelligence Cell ........................................................................ 9-1

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Chapter 10

Theater Army Movement and Maneuver Cell............................................... 10-1

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Chapter 11

Theater Army Fires Cell ................................................................................. 11-1

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Chapter 12

Theater Army Protection Cell ........................................................................ 12-1

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Chapter 13

THEATER ARMY SUSTAINMENT CELL ....................................................... 13-1

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Chapter 14

Theater Army Mission Command Cell .......................................................... 14-1

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Chapter 15

Theater Army Contingency Command Post Organization ......................... 15-1

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Chapter 16

Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff .......................................................................................................................... 16-1

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Appendix A

Command and Support Relationships ........................................................... A-1

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Appendix B

Sample Army Service Component Directive ................................................. B-1

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GLOSSARY ............................................................................................ Glossary................................................................................................................................ 2

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REFERENCES .................................................................................... References................................................................................................................................ 1

Figures

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Figure 1-1. Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Sustainment) ................... 1-4

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Figure 1-2. Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Medical) .......................... 1-5

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Figure 1-3. Theater Army Enabling Commands ..................................................................... 1-8

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Figure 2-1. Kuwaiti Theater of Operations (KTO)................................................................... 2-1

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Figure 2-2. Central Command (CENTCOM) Command and Control (C2) ............................. 2-2

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Figure 2-3. NEO Operation: Operation Assured Response ................................................... 2-4

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Figure 2-4. NEO Operations Monrovia, Liberia ...................................................................... 2-5

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Figure 2-5. Disaster Relief/Foreign Humanitarian Assistance ............................................... 2-6

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Figure 2-6. Hurricane Georges 15 Sep.98 ............................................................................. 2-6

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Figure 2-7. Hurricane Mitch 22 OCT 98 ................................................................................. 2-7

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Figure 2-8. Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Funded DoD Air Assets ................... 2-8

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Figure 3-1. Theater Army 5.4 Main Command Post Organization ......................................... 3-1

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Figure 4-1. Theater Army 5.4 CCP Organization ................................................................... 4-2

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Figure 5-1. Theater Army 5.4 Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Organization ........ 5-1

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Figure 6-1. Theater Army 5.4 Command Group ..................................................................... 6-2

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Figure 7-1. Theater Army 5.4 Personal Staff .......................................................................... 7-1

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Figure 8-1. Theater Army 5.4 Special Staff ............................................................................ 8-1

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Figure 9-1. Theater Army 5.4 Intelligence Cell ....................................................................... 9-1 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Figure 10-1. Theater Army 5.4 Movement and Maneuver Cell............................................ 10-1

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Figure 11-1. Theater Army 5.4 Fires Cell ............................................................................. 11-1

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Figure 12-1. Theater Army 5.4 Protection Cell .................................................................... 12-1

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Figure 13-1. Theater Army 5.4 Sustainment Cell ................................................................ 13-1

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Figure 13-2. Theater Army 5.4 G-1 ...................................................................................... 13-2

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Figure 13-3. Theater Army 5.4 G-4 ...................................................................................... 13-4

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Figure 13-4. Theater Army 5.4 G-8 .................................................................................... 13-10

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Figure 13-5. Theater Army 5.4 Engineer Element ............................................................. 13-13

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Figure 13-6. Theater Army 5.4 Surgeon Section ............................................................... 13-15

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Figure 14-1. Theater Army 5.4 Mission Command Cell ....................................................... 14-1

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Figure 14-2. Theater Army 5.4 G-6 ...................................................................................... 14-2

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Figure 15-1. Theater Army 5.4 Contingency Command Post Organization ........................ 15-1

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Figure 16-1. Theater Army 5.4 Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff Organization ...................................................................................... 16-1

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Figure A-1. Normal Distribution of Army Administrative Control Responsibilities.................. A-3

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Tables Table A-1. Army External Support to Other Services and Executive Agent Responsibilities ................................................................................................... A-4

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Preface

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Doctrine provides a military organization with unity of effort and a common philosophy, language, and purpose. This manual discusses the organization and operations of the theater army headquarters, including its role as the Army Service Component Command (ASCC) to the Geographic Combatant Commander (GCC) and the relationships between the theater army headquarters and the theater enabling commands. The manual also discusses theater army Title 10 functions and responsibilities, generally referred to as the Combatant Commander’s Daily Operations Requirements (CCDOR), as well as the operational employment of the theater army’s contingency command post (CCP) to directly command and control limited types of operations.

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PURPOSE

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FM 3-93 serves as a guide for organizing the theater army headquarters and its command posts, training the staff, and conducting operations as directed by the Combatant Commander.

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SCOPE

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FM 3-93 has sixteen chapters and two appendices.

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Chapter 1 discusses the theater army’s role as the ASCC and the joint context in which it operates. It discusses theater army’s responsibilities to support the Combatant Commander’s theater campaign plan across the GCC’s Area of Responsibility (AOR), hereinafter referred to as the theater army’s AOR-wide support responsibilities. It also discusses theater army’s role in theater opening, including reception, staging, onward movement, and integration (RSOI) of Army and joint forces provided to the Joint Force Commander (JFC) in joint operations areas (JOA) opened within the AOR, and the theater army’s dominant role in sustaining Army and joint forces, as directed, across the AOR . Chapter 1 also discusses the sustainment concept of support and the modification of responsibilities of the Army Forces commander (ARFOR) within the JOA. Finally, Chapter 1 discusses the theater enabling commands (intelligence, sustainment, medical, signal, and aviation) and their command or support relationships with theater army and the ARFOR operating in JOAs within the AOR.

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Chapter 2 discusses how the theater army employs its contingency command post (CCP) to support joint/combined training exercises and other theater security cooperation activities and to directly command and control limited types of military operations within the AOR.

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Chapter 3 discusses the organization and functions of the theater army’s Main Command Post (MCP).

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Chapter 4 discusses the organization and functions of the theater army’s Contingency Command Post (CCP).

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Chapter 5 discusses the organization and functions of the Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion which provides administrative and sustainment support to the theater army headquarters staff.

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Chapters 6 through 14 discuss the organization and functions of the theater army Command Group, Personal and Special Staff, and the Warfighting Functional cells (Intelligence, Movement & Maneuver, Fires, Protection, Sustainment, and Mission Command (emerging doctrinal change from Command & Control).

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Chapter 15 discusses the organization and functions of the theater army CCP, and its capabilities, limitations, and dependencies.

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Chapter 16 discusses the organization and functions of the theater army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHB), including HHB sustainment support for the CCP when it deploys.

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Appendix A explains the doctrinal command and support relationships, lists the Army Title 10 responsibilities, and Table A-1 details the current list (as of July 2010) of Army External Support to Other Services and Executive Agent Responsibilities. Although these responsibilities may be changed or amended over time, assignment of Service responsibility is based on the Service’s capabilities. Thus, changes in lead Service responsibilities are infrequent.

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Appendix B contains a sample Army Service Component Directive.

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APPLICABILITY

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This publication is most applicable to theater army commanders and staff. It also provides relevant information regarding theater army organization and operations for commanders and staffs at subordinate theater level commands and brigades, GCC, and other Service headquarters.

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ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

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Terms that have joint or Army definitions are identified in both the glossary and the text. Terms for which FM 3-93 is the proponent manual (the authority) are indicated with an asterisk in the glossary and printed in boldface in the text. For other definitions in the text, the term is italicized and the number of the proponent manual follows the definition.

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The glossary contains references of acronyms and definitions of terms not defined in JP 1-02 and FM 1-02. It does not list acronyms and abbreviations that are included for clarity only and appear one time, nor those that appear only in a figure and are listed in the legend for that figure. Some common abbreviations and acronyms— for example, DOD and abbreviations for military publications—are not spelled out (refer to the glossary). Since ARFOR is a defined term as well as an acronym, it is not spelled out.

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Introduction 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

FM 3-93, Theater Army Operations, is based on a revised operational concept developed through the analysis, discussions, and decisions made by senior Army leaders over the course of nearly eight years of Army transformation. Senior Army leaders finalized these decisions under the auspices of Army Campaign Plan (ACP) Decision Points 129 (Global Command & Control Laydown), and 123 (Division, Corps, and Theater Army Design Refinement) between December 2008 and July 2009. The new Army strategy for global command and control of Army forces relies on the Modular Corps headquarters to command and control major operations instead of theater armies. Under the revised operational concept, theater armies no longer require large Operational Command Posts (OCP) to serve as the base organization for the formation of Joint Task Force (JTF) or Joint Force Land Component Command (JFLCC)/Army Force (ARFOR) headquarters to command and control major operations.

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Every Geographic Combatant Commander (GCC) has requirements for an immediately available, deployable command and control capability for smaller-scale contingency operations, including limited intervention, peace and peacetime military engagement operations. The Chief of Staff of the Army’s (CSA) revised concept provides every theater army with a standard Contingency Command Post (CCP). Chapter 3 contains a detailed discussion of the CCP’s roles, missions, capabilities/limitations and dependencies.

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Key Decisions: The following key decisions capture the critical elements of the DP 129 decision, which have a direct effect on the revised theater army operational concept and organizational design:  An additional (fourth) active component Corps headquarters will be stood up and manned, providing a sufficient number of corps headquarters to meet current operational demands and provide an additional Corps headquarters, available and deployable world-wide, as a hedge against the possible outbreak of major combat operations anywhere in the world. The creation of this additional C2 capability allows the theater army to be relieved of its previous responsibility to transition to a JTF or JFLCC/ARFOR headquarters and provide direct operational command and control over Army and/or joint forces engaged in full spectrum operations.  Under the revised operational concept, the Theater Army Main Command Post (MCP) has no direct C2 responsibilities for Army forces in an active JOA, however it does provide some reachback support such as intelligence analysis and long range planning. Theater army enabling commands and functional brigades continue to support operations across the GCC’s AOR. For example, the regionally focused MI brigade will continue to collect against threats within the AOR and provide fused intelligence products to the theater army and other U.S. forces operating within the AOR, as required. Likewise, the Theater Sustainment Command (TSC) remains responsible for providing sustainment (less medical) for all Army forces forward-stationed, transiting, or operating within the AOR, including those Army forces assigned/OPCON to JTFs operating in JOAs established within the AOR. In addition, the TSC remains responsible for providing Army support to other services (ASOS) and USG agencies, including Common User Logistics (CUL) and other specific requirements established under specific OPLANS/CONPLANS and Army Executive Agent (AEA) agreements. These responsibilities are discussed in more detail the subsequent sections pertaining to the theater enabling commands and functional brigades.  Theater army retains responsibility for AOR-wide contingency planning and coordination, including developing and maintaining OPLANS/CONPLANS, and updated regionally focused intelligence estimates, and service support plans to the GCC’s Theater Campaign Plan. The theater army will conduct collaborative planning with corps, divisions or other designated Army headquarters assigned to execute specified OPLANS/CONPLANS or to conduct major exercises within the AOR, or those headquarters aligned with the GCC for planning purposes. In particular, the theater army will contribute its considerable regional expertise (including cultural factors and regionally focused intelligence estimates) to the collaborative planning process with corps or division headquarters preparing to conduct operations within the AOR.

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The Army will provide warfighting headquarters from the rotational force pool to meet operational command and control requirements for major operations or major exercises that exceed the limited capabilities of the theater army’s CCP. Theater armies will have access to all critical theater enabling/functional capabilities, including intelligence, signal, sustainment, medical, aviation, air & missile defense, military police (MP) and engineer. The command and support relationships for these capabilities can differ depending on the AO requirements.

Theater opening, Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (RSO&I): The sustainment concept of support outlines the responsibilities for planning and executing theater opening, RSOI, common user logistics (CUL) and other sustainment-related support to the JOA. . The theater army executes these responsibilities through the Theater Sustainment Command (TSC) and its forward-deployed command post, the Expeditionary Sustainment Command (ESC). The deployed ESC provides direct command and control over the Army units actually providing the sustainment services within the JOA. FM 4-0, provides a more detailed explanation of sustainment-related command and support relationships and the division of responsibilities between the theater army, its subordinate theater sustainment command (TSC), and other Army headquarters operating in JOAs within the GCC’s AOR

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Chapter 1

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Theater Army

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SERVICE (MILITARY DEPARTMENT) RESPONSIBILITIES

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1-1. The administrative branch of the chain of command runs from the President and Secretary of Defense to the secretaries of the military departments (DODD 5100.1 explains the functions of the Department of Defense and HQDA). Under Title 10, USC, the Secretary of the Army exercises authority, direction, and control through the CSA, for forces not assigned to combatant commands. The Secretary of the Army—  Administers and supports all Army forces, to include those assigned or attached to combatant commands.  Organizes, trains, equips, and provides forces as directed by the President and Secretary of Defense.

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1-2. The Secretary of the Army (SA) exercises administrative control (ADCON) through theater army commanders assigned to the combatant commands, unless otherwise specified by the Secretary of Defense. ADCON normally extends from the SA through the ASCC, to Army units assigned to the ASCC, and/or through an ARFOR, and then to Army units assigned or attached to an Army headquarters within that joint command. Administrative control is not tied to the operational chain of command. The SA may redirect some or all Service responsibilities outside the normal ASCC channels. In similar fashion, the ASCC may distribute some administrative responsibilities outside the ARFOR. Their primary considerations are the effectiveness of Army forces and the care of Soldiers.

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1-3. Administrative control is the direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations necessary to fulfill military department’s Title 10, USC; and executive agent responsibilities for administration, support, and force protection (FM 3-0). ARFOR commanders subordinate to the Joint Forces Commander (JFC) within specified JOAs receive Army forces and exercise Operational Control (OPCON). The theater army commander answers to the Secretary of the Army for the administration, support, and force protection of all Army forces assigned or attached to the combatant command, or transiting through the AOR. Administrative control includes the organization of Service forces, control of resources and equipment, personnel management, unit logistics, individual and unit training, readiness, mobilization, demobilization, discipline, and other matters not included in the operational missions of the subordinate or other organizations. This is the authority necessary to fulfill Military Department statutory responsibilities for administration and support.

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1-4. Combatant commanders may direct theater army commanders to provide common user logistics (CUL) and Army support to other Services (ASOS), agencies, or multinational forces. As described in FM 4-0:  Title 10 of the United States Code (USC) specifies each individual service retains its responsibility for sustainment. However, shared sustainment responsibility or common user logistics (CUL) is more effective, especially for joint operations. CUL is material or service support shared with or provided by two or more Services, DoD agencies, or multinational partners to another Service, agency or multinational partner. CUL can be restricted by type of supply and/or service and to specific units, times, missions and/or geographic locations.  Title 10 provides the CCDR authority to assign CUL responsibilities that overlap the military department’s Title 10 functions. Additionally, Directive Authority for Logistics (DAFL) is the additional authority used by the CCDR to eliminate the duplication or overlapping of sustainment responsibilities.

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The Theater Army works in conjunction with the combatant command to identify sustainment requirements, responsibilities, and C2 for sustainment. The Theater Army commander’s principal focus is on operational-level theater support involving force generation and sustainment during campaigns and joint operations. He matches sustainment requirements for a campaign to the capabilities of the Army forces. In all joint operations, sustainment is a service responsibility unless directed by executive agent directives, CCDR lead service designations, or inter-service support agreements (ISSAs). The combatant commander may designate a service component as either the temporary CUL lead or long-term single integrated theater logistics manager (SITLM) if required (FM 4-0).

1-5. Army commanders in joint organizations use ADCON authority from the theater army commander to HQDA for Service-specific requirements. This authority forms a hierarchy for Army support to deployed forces without implying a superior-subordinate relationship. For example, theater army commanders may establish centers in the area of operations to train individual replacements; complete collective training, theater orientation and theater acclimation; and manage force modernization of Army forces prior to their employment by the JFC in the JOA.

ARMY OPERATIONAL HEADQUARTERS IN AN AOR 1-6. The Army contributes organizational elements and capabilities to JFCs. Those JFCs can conduct joint, interagency, and multinational operations across the spectrum of conflict. Army echelons can function at the operational level of war and contribute capabilities to joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational operations. These capabilities include—  Theater army headquarters, with their Contingency Command Posts and their associated theaterenabling commands and functional brigades, provide command and control over Army and/or joint forces for smaller-scale contingency operations.  Corps and Division headquarters task organized with subordinate brigade combat teams, supporting brigades, and other units provide command and control over Army and/or joint forces for major, sustained operations.  Expeditionary Sustainment Commands (ESC) or other sustainment management headquarters provide direct OPCON over Army sustainment units (less medical) providing sustainment support to Army and joint forces in JOAs opened within the AOR.  Medical Brigades (MEDBDE) provide direct OPCON over the Army medical units task organized under them (normally assigned or attached). MEDBDEs normally have a command relationship with the theater Medical Command (Deployment Support) [MEDCOM (DS)], and a support relationship with the operational force headquarters (division or corps as ARFOR) in the JOA. Under certain conditions, a MEDBDE may be attached or placed OPCON to an Army division or corps HQs (as ARFOR), but this limits the senior medical commander’s ability to rapidly task organize and reallocate resources across the AOR (See FM 4-02.12).

REDEFINING ARFOR RESPONSIBILITIES

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1-7. FM 1-02 defines ARFOR as the senior Army headquarters and all Army forces assigned or attached to a combatant command, subordinate joint force command, joint functional command, or multinational command. FM 3-0 defines ARFOR as the Army component of joint forces.

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1-8. An ARFOR is the Army component headquarters for a joint task force or a joint and multinational force. It consists of the senior Army headquarters and its commander (when not designated as the joint force commander) and all Army forces that the combatant commander subordinates to the joint task force or places under the control of a multinational force commander. The ARFOR within a JOA exercises direct OPCON over all Army maneuver and support forces (MP, Engineer, CBRNE, Aviation, Civil Affairs, etc.), except for Army forces providing sustainment support (including Medical). The ARFOR in a JOA identifies requirements and establishes priorities of support for Army forces within the JOA, and coordinates with the theater army for the provision of sustainment support. The Army service component command may itself function as an ARFOR headquarters unless the combatant commander exercises 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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command and control through subordinate joint force commanders. In this case, each subordinate joint force commander would potentially have a subordinate ARFOR, while the ASCC would exercise ADCON of all Army forces across the AOR, and provide ASOS, CUL, AEA and sustainment support to Army, joint, and multinational forces and interagency elements within all JOAs opened within the AOR.

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1-9. The Sustainment Concept of Support for the modular force removed sustainment units (including medical) from the organic structure of Army divisions and corps by replacing organic Division and Corps Support Commands with non-organic sustainment and medical brigades. Sustainment and medical brigades normally have a support relationship rather than a command relationship with the operational ARFOR and its subordinate Army divisions and corps in a JOA. Sustainment brigades support the force in a general support (GS) or a direct support (DS) role. In most cases, all Army units providing sustainment support within a JOA (except for medical units and organic brigade support battalions/companies) will be assigned, attached, or placed OPCON to an Expeditionary Sustainment Command (ESC). The ESC will normally have a command relationship with the Theater Sustainment Command assigned to the theater army. See FM 4-94, and FM 4-0 for a more detailed explanation for sustainment support and command and support relationships between Army maneuver forces (ARFOR) and supporting Army sustainment units .

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1-10. Army sustainment units (less medical) supporting the force (Army, joint and multinational forces) will normally be task organized under the operational control (OPCON) of an Expeditionary Sustainment Command (ESC) within the JOA (See Figure 1-1 Theater Army Command and Support Relationships [Sustainment]). Multifunctional medical battalions will normally support divisions and corps in a DS role, maintaining a command relationship to the medical brigade and theater level MEDCOM (See Figure 1-2 Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Medical). This relieves Division or Corps headquarters (as operational ARFOR within the JOA) of the tasks associated with the actual provision of administration and sustainment support for Army forces; and ASOS, CUL support, and the execution of Army Executive Agent (AEA) responsibilities in support of Army, joint, and multinational forces. In effect, the modular force sustainment concept splits the traditional ARFOR responsibilities between the senior Army headquarters in the JOA or assigned to the JFC (Division or Corps) and Theater Army. The senior Army headquarters in the JOA has command authority over all Army maneuver and support forces, except for those units task organized under the supporting Expeditionary Sustainment Command (ESC) and medical brigade.. Theater Army is responsible for providing sustainment support for all Army forces stationed in, transiting, or operating within the AOR. Theater Army is also responsible for providing most ASOS, CUL, and AEA support to joint and multinational forces, and interagency elements within the AOR. Theater Army executes these sustainment responsibilities through its assigned Theater Sustainment Command (TSC) and ESC and/or Sustainment Brigades tailored and provided from the Army force pool. Theater army executes its responsibilities to provide health services to support the force through its assigned MEDCOM (DS) and forward deployed medical brigades.

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Figure 1-1. Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Sustainment)

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Figure 1-2. Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Medical)

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1-11. Army support to other services (ASOS) and Army Executive Agent responsibilities include some tasks and functions, which are not sustainment related. The operational ARFOR in a JOA can assume responsibility for some of these tasks and functions, by exception and at the direction of the GCC. In such cases, the ARFOR or one of its subordinate commands assumes operational control (OPCON) of the units responsible for executing the selected task or function. Examples of ASOS and AEA responsibilities, which might be assigned to the operational ARFOR within the JOA, include detainee operations, and veterinary support to military working dog programs.

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1-12. The GCC can assign responsibility for the execution of Army specific ADCON/Title 10 functions to the operational ARFOR within a JOA but this is usually by exception. Examples of ADCON/Title 10 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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responsibilities, which the GCC might assign to the operational ARFOR within the JOA, include theater specific training or the approval and processing of military awards.

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1-13. The doctrine proponents plan to revise the definition and discussion of ARFOR responsibilities (as set forth above) in subsequent revisions of FM 3-0, FM 3-92, FM 4-0, FM 1-01, FM 1-02 and other relevant publications.

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THEATER ARMY AS ARMY SERVICE COMPONENT TO A GCC

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1-14. Each combatant command has an Army Service Component Command (ASCC) assigned to it. Theater army headquarters serve as the ASCC for each Geographic Combatant Commands (GCC). The theater army headquarters includes the commander, staff, and all Army forces (organizations, units, personnel, and installations) assigned to the combatant command. The organization of the headquarters is based on a table of organization and equipment (TOE), tailored to the specific requirements of each AOR through a modified table of organization and equipment (MTOE), and may be further augmented by a table of distribution and allowance to account for temporary or variable operational requirements within each AOR.

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1-15. A theater army assigned to a GCC provides a regionally oriented, long-term Army presence for, peacetime military engagement, security cooperation, deterrence and limited intervention operations, and provides support to Army and joint forces operating in Joint Operations Areas (JOA) opened within the GCC’s AOR. Army operational-level organizations assigned to the theater army provide theater-level capabilities necessary to perform operational-level tasks as well as to assist and augment subordinate tactical organizations.

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1-16. The theater army is not designed to operate as the JTF, JFLCC, or ARFOR for major operations within a single JOA. The Army corps headquarters is designed to command and control land forces in major operations in a single JOA and/or rapidly transition to a JTF headquarters for major operations. The Army corps is the Army’s headquarters of choice for these roles and missions. However, when land operations are conducted concurrently in multiple JOAs within a single AOR, the GCC may designate the theater army as a theater level JFLCC with specific command & control, force protection, and sustainment responsibilities. The primary responsibilities of a theater level JFLCC may be to provide coordination with other theater-level functional components; to provide general support for multiple JOAs within the AOR; to conduct theater-level contingency planning, or to conduct JRSOI for the entire land force.

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1-17. In addition to sustainment support AOR wide, the theater army also coordinates force protection for all forces, installations, and operating bases across the AOR. In high-threat environments, the JFC may designate a Joint Security Coordinator (JSC) to provide a dedicated focus on Joint Security Operations within the Joint Security Area(s). Under these circ*mstances, the JFC normally designates a component commander with the appropriate capabilities and force structure to perform this function. Often, the theater army may be designated as the joint security coordinator and be responsible for the joint security area. (See JP 3-10 for more information.) When so tasked, the theater army typically resources the force protection requirements to support not only Army forces in theater, but also joint and multinational forces and any designated theater army support area/JSA. The theater army protection cell (with augmented joint, interagency, and multinational forces) provides the nucleus of the joint security coordination center. The theater army may designate a Maneuver Enhancement Brigade (MEB) to serve as its operational protection headquarters, receiving mission orders to supervise selected forces (including tactical combat forces [TCFs]). The theater army, when required, also provides an Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC) or Brigade for command and control of ground based air and missile defense forces in support of Army, joint, and multinational forces. While these Army units may be placed under the OPCON of the Area Air Defense Coordinator (AADC), they remain under the Service ADCON of the theater Army.

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1-18. The theater army design provides a robust Main Command Post (MCP) to perform its ASCC Title 10 functions but its contingency command post (CCP) provides only a limited capability to directly command and control operations, a capability which is insufficient to enable the theater army to perform as a JTF or JFLC for major operations. The Army Corps headquarters is the organization best suited for commanding and controlling land forces or transitioning to JTF or JFLC headquarters, for major 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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operations. The theater army design allows it to perform the functions of the Army Service Component Command (ASCC) to the GCC, and execute its Title 10, ADCON, Common User Logistics (CUL), and Army Executive Agent responsibilities. These responsibilities extend to the support of any JOAs opened within the AOR, including theater opening, and Army Support to Other Services/agencies (ASOS).

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1-19. The theater army, with its deployable CCP, has a limited capability to provide direct command and control over operations – limited in terms of scale, scope, intensity and duration. Chapter X explains in further detail the organization, capabilities, limitations, and dependencies of the CCP.

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1-20. Although the theater structure for each GCC is unique, the functional requirements of a theater organization remain somewhat constant. The CSA, working with the each supported GCCs, configures theater armies to meet the specific requirements of their respective AORs. The theater army commander provides the GCC with operationally relevant Army capabilities. The level of capability and support required varies from one AOR to another. The theater army commander identifies the specific Army capabilities required to support the combatant commander, and works with HQDA, FORSCOM, AMC, TRADOC, and other ASCCs in tailoring assigned Army units to provide specific capabilities to the combatant command and deploys those capabilities into the area of responsibility as required. As the situation changes, the Secretary of Defense modifies those resourcing decisions as necessary based on the combatant commander’s request for forces or previously approved plans.

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THEATER ARMY ENABLING COMMANDS/BDES (TEC)

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1-21. All theater armies will be assigned (or provided access to) a mix of forces to support the theater with the following types of enabling capabilities (See Figure 1-1 Theater Army Enabling Commands):  Sustainment  Signal  Medical  Military Intelligence  Civil Affairs

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1-22. In addition, some theater armies may be assigned one or more of the following types of functional units, based upon specific requirements of the AOR:  Engineer  Military Police  CBRNE  Air and Missile Defense  Information Operations  Aviation

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Figure 1-3. Theater Army Enabling Commands

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TEC FUNCTIONAL SUPPORT AND COMMAND & SUPPORT RELATIONSHIPS 1-23. Theater armies are assigned or provided access to five enabling capabilities (Sustainment, Signal, Medical, Military Intelligence and Civil Affairs), and an assortment of functional and multifunctional units, based on AOR specific requirements. The command and/or support relationships between theater army and these enabling commands are explained below.

Theater Sustainment Command (TSC)

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1-24. Per FM 4-94, the TSC headquarters is normally assigned to the theater army and is considered theater committed. A supporting to supported relationship is established between the TSC (and, by extension, the ESC) and the operational ARFOR in the JOA. Sustainment brigades are tailored to the mission, task organized under the ESC (normally attached), and placed in either general support (GS) of the force on an area basis or in direct support (DS) of a specific command or group of forces.

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1-25. Expeditionary Sustainment Commands (ESCs) are rotational units from the pool of Army forces, and are assigned, attached or placed OPCON to the TSC to provide command and control of Army sustainment units (less medical) supporting Army and joint forces within the AOR. Sustainment brigades, tailored with the appropriate mix of sustainment providing units, are normally attached to the ESC for operations. Doctrinally, the ESC functions as an extension of the TSC rather than a separate echelon of command. The ESC deploys to into an AO/JOA and provides forward-based command and control of TSC units providing sustainment (less medical) support to the force. The ESC normally deploys its command post to a location near the air and sea ports of debarkation (APODs/SPODs) from which it can effectively command and control sustainment support operations. This location may be a secured site within the JOA or a sanctuary location within the greater Joint Support Area (JSA). The ESC is responsible for theater opening, including the execution of port and terminal operations and Reception, Staging, Onward movement, and Integration (RSOI), and normally has a subordinate sustainment brigade specially tailored for these tasks.

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1-26. The ESC receives liaison elements from the theater Medical Command (MEDCOM) and establishes a medical logistics management center (MLMC) to coordinate Class XVIII (medical logistics) support to medical units supporting the force. See Figure 1-1. Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Sustainment).

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Signal Command (Theater) [SC (T)] or Theater Signal Bde

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1-27. Per FMI 6-02.45, the SC (T) provides communication and information systems support to an ASCC (theater army) headquarters, ASCC subordinate units, and as required, to joint and multinational organizations throughout the GCC’s AOR. The signal command and its subordinate units install, operate, and the defend the Army portion of the joint interdependent theater network, and leverage the extension and reachback capabilities of the Global Information Grid (GIG) to provide joint communication and information systems services to the ASCC commander and the supported GCC. The signal command exercises command and control over a wide variety of other signal organizations in a theater, including multiple tactical signal brigades (TTSBs), theater strategic signal brigades (TSSBs), theater NETOPS and security centers, the combat camera (COMCAM) company, and a tactical installation signal company.

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1-28. The SC (T) is the highest-level deployable organization in charge of theater LandWarNet (LWN). It is a major subordinate command of NETCOM (assigned) and operates under the OPCON of the supported ASCC/theater army. The SC (T) is the signal force provider for the theater, and may have one or more subordinate theater tactical signal brigades (TTSBs) with multiple expeditionary signal battalions (ESBs) task organized under them.

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1-29. The Expeditionary Signal Battalion (ESB) may be employed to support Army corps, divisions, brigade combat teams (BCT), or Service component, or multinational headquarters, as required. Although the ESB is typically assigned to a TTSB, it may be assigned or attached to other higher-level organizations. ESBs provide JNN, CPN and other communications and information systems capabilities to headquarters, which do not have organic JNN or CPN capabilities.

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Medical Command (MEDCOM [DS])

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1-30. Per FM 4-02.12, the theater level MEDCOM is assigned to the theater army and serves as the medical force provider within the theater. The MEDCOM (DS) and its subordinate medical brigades are linked to the TSC/ESC through the medical logistics management center (MLMC) which is established at the ESC/TSC to plan and coordinate medical logistics in support of operations.

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1-31. The MEDCOM (DS) is organized with an operational command post (OCP) and a Main Command Post (MCP) which can deploy forward autonomously. The multifunctional medical battalions (MMBs) which provide Army health services (AHS) to the force are task organized under the command and control of a medical brigade (MEDBDE) subordinate to the MEDCOM (DS). The MMBs are normally placed in direct support of Army divisions or in general support on an area basis. Thus, all Army health service units maintain a command relationship with a medical chain of command from the MMB through the MEDBDE to the theater level MEDCOM (DS). See Figure 1-2 Theater Army Command and Support Relationships (Medical).

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Military Intelligence Bde

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1-32. The theater MIB is assigned to INSCOM, a HQDA direct reporting unit, and attached or placed OPCON to theater army. Although the MIB headquarters is considered theater committed and not deployable outside its AOR, its subordinate MI battalions may be included in the Army pool of rotational forces and may be deployed for operations outside its AOR. When the MIB’s subordinate battalions are deployed to support the operational ARFOR in a JOA, they are normally attached to an MIB, Battlefield Surveillance Brigade (BfSB) or other brigade-level organization under the ARFOR in order to link into the ARFOR’s supporting sustainment structure.

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1-33. The theater MIB provides regionally focused collection and analysis in support of theater army daily operations requirements and contingency operations. In particular, the theater army headquarters relies heavily on the MIB for land order of battle, intelligence estimates, and fused intelligence products to support theater army planning requirements, including maintenance of OPLANS/CONPLANS, and development of Army supporting plans to the GCC’s theater campaign plan. The theater army Intelligence cell was deliberately designed with a dependency on the MIB for this collection and analytic support.

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placing those assets OPCON or DS to the operational ARFOR or by providing intelligence support on a GS or DS basis via reachback. In either case, the supported operational ARFOR HQs tasks the MIB assets by identifying Commander’s Critical Information Requirements (CCIR) and Priority Intelligence Requirements (PIR) and assigning the associated collection requirements to the supporting MIB or its operational elements.

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1-35. The theater MIB’s regional focus enhances its capabilities to develop and exploit AOR-specific language skills and cultural insights and provides the benefits of continuity and cultural context to its analytic intelligence products. The theater MIB’s unique ability to collect, analyze and track the land order of battle and doctrine of both partner nations and adversaries over many years allows it to create and maintain a valuable data base of intelligence regarding regional military forces, key military and political leaders, and the evolving doctrine and capabilities of regional military forces.

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Civil Affairs

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1-36. Per FM 3-05.40, the Theater Special Operations Command (TSOC) is the joint special operations command through which the GCC normally exercises OPCON of special operations forces within the AOR The Civil Military Operations (CMO) staff cell of the TSOC provides deliberate and contingency planning, maintenance of existing plans, assessments, and support to the GCC’s Theater Security Cooperation Plan (TSCP).

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1-37. The Civil Affairs Command (CACOM) provides theater level staff plugs to the GCC and its subordinate subunified and Service component commands, as required to support military operations. Civil Affairs Planning Teams (CAPTs) from the theater aligned CACOM, CA Bde or CA battalion augment the GCC, ASCC, and Joint Force Land Component staffs, providing liaison and coordination, education and training, and area assessment functions. CA augmentation elements are normally attached to the headquarters they are dispatched to support.

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Aviation Bde 1-38. The theater aviation brigade (if assigned) is the force provider for Army aviation capabilities to support the combatant commander’s daily operations requirements (CCDOR) across the AOR and may provide Army aviation units to the ARFOR operating in a JOA within the AOR. The theater aviation brigade/battalion (when available) may either have a command or support relationship with the theater army.

Army Air & Missile Defense Command (AAMDC)

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1-39. There are only three AAMDCs in the Army structure, two AC and one USAR. The AAMDCs (when available) are assigned to the theater army for CCDOR, and placed OPCON to the JFLC/ARFOR and in direct support (DS) of the JFACC for military operations. Other Army ADA units in the AOR are normally assigned, attached or OPCON to the AAMDC.

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1-40. The Joint Force Commander (JFC) establishes air and missile defense (AMD) priorities, allocates forces, and apportions air power. The JFC typically assigns overall responsibility for counterair, and airspace control to the Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC), and responsibility for defensive counterair (DCA) operations to the Area Air Defense Commander (AADC). The AADC is responsible for coordinating with joint and multinational partners to develop procedures for a combined theater air and missile defense (TAMD) plan and is typically the component with the preponderance of ADA capabilities in theater. The Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC) supports the AADC for AMD operations and is normally under the operational control of the joint force land component command (JFLCC) and in direct support to the joint force air component command (JFACC).

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1-41. The Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC) commander serves in several roles. He commands the AAMDC and its subordinate units, functions as the theater army air and missile defense coordinator (TAAMDCOORD) for the ARFOR or JFLCC and acts as the deputy AADC if designated. The AAMDC typically locates with the ARFOR or JFLCC headquarters or the joint/combined air operations center (JAOC/CAOC) to facilitate AMD planning and integration. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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1-42. The AAMDC has overall responsibility for planning Army AMD operations in support of the JFC. The AAMDC task organizes and assigns missions to the subordinate ADA brigade(s) once planning is complete. The AAMDC has dedicated liaison teams that can deploy to major theater and ARFOR elements (JFACC, JFLCC, JSOTF, BCD...) to facilitate and integrate ARFOR AMD planning and operations. In some cases, the AAMDC conducts split based operations which precludes them from being in theater. If the AAMDC is not located in theater the responsibility for planning falls to the highest echelon ADA organization in the theater as well as providing liaisons to the JFLCC, BCD, and AADC etc. FMs 3-01, 301.7, and FM 3-01.94 provide a more in depth explanation of the command and support relationships for theater AMD.

Other Army Functional or Multifunctional Units 1-43. Other Army functional or multifunctional units may be made available to the theater army based on specific requirements of the AOR such as forward stationing, base operations, enduring security force assistance or theater security cooperation activities, or ongoing military operations. These Army functional or multifunctional units may have either a command or a support relationship with theater army. In some cases, certain functional or multifunctional units may support more than one theater army or AOR.

Field Army

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1-44. The field army is designed to perform the operational ARFOR tasks, and is the Army component to the JFC to which it is assigned. A field army, specifically tailored to the mission requirements, may be assigned to a JFC with an enduring operational requirement. Typically, a subunified command is established instead of a JTF when the military operation is anticipated to be enduring or protracted. In such case, a field army would be appropriate as the Army component or ARFOR to the subunified command

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1-45. The theater army exercises ADCON over the field army and its subordinate Army forces, and provides the field army and its JFC all Army service functions including Title 10, CUL, ASOS and AEA responsibilities, and sustainment and medical support for Army and joint forces operating in the JOA or theater of operations in which the field army is assigned. At the direction of the GCC, theater army may delegate execution authority to the field army for specified Army service functions.

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1-46. The situation on the Korean Peninsula is an example of an enduring military operation in which a subunified command (U.S. Forces – Korea or USFK) was established as the JFC instead of a JTF. Until the situation in the Republic of Korea is further resolved, the US Army will retain a unique structure on the Korean Peninsula. Eighth U.S. Army (EUSA) will serve as the forward deployed Field Army HQs and ARFOR to USFK or its successor joint/combined forces HQs. Renamed Eighth Field Army, it will be configured and staffed to provide an operational command and control capability for Army forces engaged in enduring operations. Eighth Field Army will be under the ADCON of U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) for most Army service functions.

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THEATER ARMY COMMANDER 1-47. The theater army commander is the senior Army officer—not assigned to the combatant command or other joint headquarters within the AOR. Per JP 1/JP 3-0 and FM 3-0, a theater army commander supporting a geographic combatant command must—  As a supporting component, provide Army support to a supported Service or functional component of the combatant command.  As a supported component, receive and integrate support from other components of the combatant command.  Recommend the appropriate use of Army forces to the combatant commander or other JFC.  Accomplish assigned operational missions as an ARFOR.  Perform joint training, to include training required by other Service components for which the theater army commander has primary responsibility.

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    

  

Inform the combatant commander of planning for changes in Army sustainment support that would significantly affect operational capability or sustainability. Provide support to the joint operation and exercise plans with necessary force data to support missions that the combatant commander assigns. Develop Army program and budget requests that comply with the combatant commander’s guidance on war fighting requirements and priorities. Inform the combatant commander of program and budget decisions that affects joint operational planning. Perform Army-specific functions such as internal administration and discipline, Service training, normal sustainment functions, Army intelligence matters, and specific oversight of intelligence activities to ensure compliance with U.S. laws, policies, and directives. Inform the combatant commander of joint nonstrategic nuclear support required by the Army. Ensure signal and information management interoperability with the higher joint headquarters. Provide sustainment support to Army forces assigned to JTFs operating in the combatant command’s AOR.

THEATER ARMY HEADQUARTERS ORGANIZATION

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1-48. The modular theater army headquarters contains the theater army commander, deputy commanding general (DCG), and the commander’s personal and coordinating staff principals, under the supervision of the chief of staff. Theater army remains the senior Army headquarters for the AOR and provides Title 10 support—to include policy, plans, programs, and budgeting—to its assigned Army forces in the combatant command’s AOR.

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1-49.

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1-50. The modular theater army headquarters is organized with a Command Group, Personal and Special Staffs, a Chief of Staff/SGS, and the following Warfighting Functional cells :  Intelligence  Movement & Maneuver  Fires  Protection  Sustainment  Mission Command **

Four broad design concepts underlie the organization of the modular theater army headquarters: Each theater army headquarters is a regionally focused, globally networked organization. It is theater-committed, and is not part of the Army’s pool of rotational forces..  The theater army headquarters is designed to exercise administrative control over all Army forces assigned to the supported combatant command, provide theater opening capabilities to support all JOAs opened within the AOR, provide Army support to joint, interagency, and multinational elements (ASOS), and perform additional Army support functions established in specific OPLANS/CONPLANS and Army Executive Agent (AEA) agreements.  Theater army headquarters is organized with three organic components with specific functions:  A Main Command Post (MCP) which performs all of the ASCC functions (Title 10, ADCON, ASOS, CUL, and support to JOA) supporting the combatant commander’s daily operations requirements (CCDOR).  The Contingency Command Post (CCP) provides a limited capability to directly command and control forces for small-scale contingency operations within the AOR.  A Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHB), which provides administrative and logistics support for the theater army headquarters and all of its organic command post elements.  Although normally co-located for stationing, the theater army MCP and CCP ordinarily remain configured as separate command posts in order to maintain the rapid deployment capability of the CCP. 

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**Emerging doctrine from FM 3-0 revision

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1-51. As an administrative headquarters, the theater army’s normal battle rhythm and work schedule conform to the prevailing business work hours of the local community, and are coordinated with the Geographic Combatant Commander (GCC) headquarters. Most of the theater army staff works a standard eight-hour day during steady state operations. The Current Operations Cell is an exception to that norm. It monitors the activities of Army forces within the AOR 24hours per day, seven days a week. The Chief of Staff, in accordance with the Commander’s guidance, may extend or otherwise modify the work schedule of the headquarters in order to support operational requirements within the AOR, including theater army support of Joint or Army forces operating in one or more JOAs within the AOR.

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1-52. In general, all theater army staff elements employ the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP) as the standard process for planning, and the Operations Process (plan, prepare, execute & assess) for integrating and synchronizing all the warfighting fighting functions. Theater army staff elements may participate in campaign design and the Joint Operations Planning Process (JOPP) when collaborating directly with the combatant command or interacting with other service component commands. Some staff elements may rely upon other formal, defined processes in addition to the Operations Process. If this is the case, the additional process is required in the appropriate staff element narrative. Examples of this include defined processes within/subordinate to the Operations Process such as the D3A (Decide Detect, Deliver, Assess) process used by the Fires Warfighting Functional Cell in targeting,, and the G-8, which uses the Planning, Programming Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) process in resource management.

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1-53. DEPENDENCIES: The theater army headquarters depends on theater enabling units for staff functions or supporting capabilities. While these enablers may vary considerably by size and type between GCCs, the basic dependencies are explained below. Theater army headquarters is dependent on:  The theater signal command or brigade for connectivity to all LandWarNet services, including the establishment and operation of the theater network architecture to support theater army headquarters and all Army and joint forces operating within the AOR. The theater army headquarters has no organic signal capability and is dependent on the theater signal command or brigade for all network and signal capabilities, including Joint Network Node (JNN) or Command Post Node (CPN) elements to support the Contingency Command Post (CCP) when it deploys to command and control operations.  The garrison command of the installation on which it is located for installation access control and local security of the permanent headquarters (garrison or installation security).  Theater military intelligence brigade (MIB) for analytical support (military intelligence brigade or battalion) to provide regionally focused collection and analysis to support theater army planning (OPLAN/CONPLAN development) and operational intelligence to support the direct C2 of limited smaller scale contingency operations. In addition, the theater intelligence unit provides regionally focused intelligence collection and analysis in support of JTFs and JFLC/ARFOR headquarters and other Army forces operating in JOAs within the AOR.  U.S. Army Materiel Command (USAMC) for support through the aligned Army Field Support Brigade (AFSB), Contracting Support Brigade (CSB), and Logistic Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP). These organizations and programs provide national sustainment, operational and theater contracting, and added sustainment support respectively. Additionally, elements of the U.S. Corps of Engineers support the theater army in some operations.  Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) personnel for logistical reach to the national supply system.  A civil affairs planning team from a Civil Affairs Brigade or Command to provide staff augmentation of the Theater Army G-9 for operations.  A force protection team to assist the theater army antiterrorism/force protection section in force protection, physical security, antiterrorism, and response force operations.  An engineer terrain team for all geospatial information and services.  A modular chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) team to establish a full-time CBRN planning expertise and assessment capability within the headquarters.

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   

Public affairs detachments or teams to augment the organic staff, and establish a media support, or broadcast center, if required. Air Traffic Services Command augmentation for air traffic service during operational surges. An Army band to enhance unit cohesion and Soldier morale and provide musical support for civil-military, multinational, and community relations operations. A military police protective services detachment to provide close-in protective service details for the theater army commander, deputy commanders, and other designated high-risk personnel, as required. The Human Resources Sustainment Center (HRSC) and Financial Management Center of the theater sustainment command for the execution of specified personnel and financial management activities. Digital Liaison Detachments to provide liaison with multinational headquarters or partners during operations and exercises.

OPTIONS FOR FORMING A JOINT TASK FORCE STAFF

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1-54. Chapter II of Joint Publication 3-33 Joint Task Force Headquarters describes a JTF and discusses the options for forming a JTF in detail. It explains the organization and command relationships. The JTF's assigned mission and the operational environment dictate its organization and relationship with other organizations. The composition of existing and potential adversaries, the nature of the crisis (e.g., floods, earthquakes....), and the time available to achieve the end state are factors when forming a JTF.

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1-55. JP 3-33 points out that there are three options that may be used to form a JTF HQ:  The preferred option is to form a JTF HQ around a combatant command’s Service component HQ or the Service component’s existing subordinate HQ (such as a numbered fleet, numbered Air Force, Marine Expeditionary Force, or Army Corps) that includes an established command structure.  In some cases, the Geographic Combatant Commander (GCC) may designate the standing joint force headquarters (Core Element) (SJFHQ [CE]) as the core HQ element and augment it with additional Service functional experts.  The combatant command assessment team or similar organization forms the core element for the JTF is the third option. This option is used typically where no military presence currently exist.

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1-56. The Contingency Command Post (CCP) of Theater Army (TA) offers the GCC a fourth option for forming and deploying a JTF. The GCC could use the TA CCP as the core element of a JTF and augment it with additional personnel, either Army or Sister Service, to conduct the mission. Because of its established habitual internal staff working relationship, the CCP would be a viable option to support short notice/limited duration operations.

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TRAINING IMPLICATIONS

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1-57. The CCP deploys as a rapid redeployment assessment capability, in most cases but can also become the core element of a JTF for small-scale contingency operations, or combined with other components as a staff plug for an ad hoc JTF headquarters. Each option for forming the JTF requires specific military skill sets and training levels to ensure the required capabilities are organic to the JTF. One important requisite skill set is the staff’s proficiency on joint C2 systems, networks, and software applications. The theater army is equipped with Army Battle Command Systems (ABCS) and is able to train on them. However, the theater army must coordinate with the GCC to gain access to joint C2 capabilities for CCP training.

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1-58. United States Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) has fielded (or will shortly field) a Deployable Joint C2 (DJC2) suite of equipment for each GCC (some GCCs may have multiple equipment sets). DJC2 provides the combatant and component commands a rapidly deployable, scalable, modular command post suite, according to the DJC2 Program Executive Office (PEO). Reconfiguration of the DJC2 system allows for rapid response and en route communications capabilities if required. This suite of equipment 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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provides a standardized command post with full joint C2 capabilities, including the servers, workstations, and satellite uplinks to support JWICS, CENTRIX, NGO, SIPRNET and NIPRNET networks, GCCS-J and C2PC applications, and a host of collaborative information environment (CIE) and communications capabilities. Go to https://www.djc2.org for additional information covering the DJC2 program. Thus, gaining access to joint C2 systems for training, the CCP is largely a question of coordination and scheduling between theater armies and their respective GCCs.

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Chapter 2

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Theater Army Contingency Command Post Employment

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2-1. In order to better understand how the theater army conducts operations, this chapter will examine several historical examples and hypothetical scenarios to illustrate how JTFs have been formed and used in the past and how the theater army and its CCP might be employed under similar circ*mstances in the future. These examples will examine theater army operations, both as the ASCC in support of Army and joint forces operating in JOAs within the AOR and as an ARFOR or JTF directly commanding and controlling Army and/or joint forces conducting operations in a designated JOA. In all cases, the theater army headquarters, with its organic CCP, is simply one of several tools available to the GCC to address the operational C2 requirements across the AOR. The GCC determines to use or not use the theater army or its CCP in the C2 scheme for any given operation. The examples that follow merely explore ways for employing the theater army and it’s CCP.

EXAMPLE NUMBER 1: OPERATION DESERT SHIELD

Figure 2-1. Kuwaiti Theater of Operations (KTO)

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2-2. The first example, Operation Desert Shield, provides a situation, which is useful for examining how the theater army provides sustainment support to Army and joint forces in a JOA. It also provides an opportunity to explore CCP employment options to command and control the initial phases of a long-term operation. Examples are the rapid deployment of an airborne brigade combat team (BCT) to deter an

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adversary, followed by a build-up of forces and relief of the CCP-based headquarters by a more capable warfighting headquarters (division or corps). Figure 2-1depicts the Kuwaiti Theater Operation (KTO).

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2-3. In the early morning hours of August 2, 1990, three armored divisions of Saddam Hussein’s elite Iraqi Republican Guard crossed the Kuwaiti border and sped toward the city of Kuwait. The several brigades of the Kuwaiti Army, already disorganized by special operations attacks, proved no match for this assault. Within days, most Kuwaiti forces had surrendered or escaped to Saudi Arabia, the Republican Guard divisions had closed the Saudi border, and the Iraqi follow-on forces had fanned out to secure the oil fields and commercial wealth of the small, yet prosperous country.

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2-4. For the American government and President George H. W. Bush, the first priority was to deter further Iraqi aggression and provide an effective defense of Saudi Arabia. Disruption of Kuwaiti oil supplies was damaging enough to the global economy; disruption of Saudi oil supplies could have been disastrous. The Saudis shared Bush’s view, and their national leadership overcame a traditional antipathy to the presence of foreign troops. On August 6, 1990, Saudi King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz approved American intervention to assist in the defense of his kingdom. The president approved the deployment of combat forces to the kingdom. Shortly, thereafter, SECDEF issued a directive assigning Central Command the mission to deter and counter any Iraqi aggression against Saudi Arabia. The challenge for the U.S. Army and the other services was to turn that line into a substantial barrier through which Iraqi forces could not penetrate.

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2-5. Under the direction of U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM), the force buildup, code-named Operation DESERT SHIELD, began. With the operational area halfway around the world from the United States and thousands of Iraqi troops sitting on the Kuwait-Saudi border, speed in the buildup was critical. The President’s intent was to deploy enough forces to deter an Iraqi attack on Saudi Arabia and, eventually, to enforce UN Security Council Resolutions calling for Iraq’s withdrawal from Kuwait. Diplomatic efforts would allow time to build an effective military multinational to fight a war.

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2-6. The buildup of Operation DESERT SHIELD took on a solid joint character from the very beginning. General Schwarzkopf named competent component commanders. The Ninth Air Force under Lieutenant General Charles Horner became US Central Command Air Forces (USCENTAF). Third Army, under Lieutenant General John Yeosock, became US Army Forces, Central Command (USARCENT). Lieutenant General Walter Boomer, the Commanding General of the First Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), became commander of the US Marine Component, US Central Command (USMARFORCENT), and the Seventh Fleet Commander, Vice Admiral Henry Mauz, commanded US Naval Forces, US Central Command (USNAVCENT). Special Operations Component, US Central Command, retained OPCON of all SOF. See Figure 2-2. Central Command (CENTCOM) Command and Control (C2) below.

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Figure 2-2. Central Command (CENTCOM) Command and Control (C2) 2-7. The deployment of combat forces to the Gulf started on 7 August 1990. The first Army unit to deploy was the ready brigade of the 82nd Airborne Division. With its light antitank weapons and Sheridan tanks, the second Brigade established perimeter defenses around Dhahran airfield and the port at Al Jubayl. The lead elements of the XVIII Airborne Corps assault CP arrived by air on 9 August, although most of its command post equipment arrived later by sea. By 24 August, the first and third Brigades had completed their deployment to Saudi Arabia. Additional Army units also arrived in August, including the 7th Transportation Group, the 11th Signal Brigade, and the 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade. The organization of this force package allowed it to meet the daily demands of a changing and growing force.

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During this phase of the buildup, the Army provided in-theater support for other Services and arranged contracted and host-nation support, including water, subsistence, fuel, transportation, and sanitary support.

EMPLOYENT OF THEATER ARMY IN DESERT SHIELD AND SIMILAR SCENARIOS

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2-8. The command structure established by CENTCOM for DESERT SHIELD (and later DESERT STORM) was unique in several ways. First, GEN Schwarzkopf did not establish a subordinate JTF to command and control the operation. Instead, GEN Schwarzkopf, as CENTCOM commander, retained direct control of his Service and functional components. In addition, he personally served as the land component commander over 3rd Army (including two Army corps) and I MEF which executed major land operations and did not use a Joint Force Land Component Commander (JFLCC) as advocates of joint doctrine might have expected. However, Schwarzkopf did exercise command and control over all Army through a single Army component headquarters, ARCENT/Third Army. ARCENT, under command of LTG Yeosock, in its role as the ASCC to CENTCOM, provided command and control over all Army theater-level ADCON and sustainment responsibilities, as well as for the combat, combat support and combat service support assets in the two Army corps. Yeosock also performed overall land component planning responsibilities for GEN Schwarzkopf in the absence of a dedicated JFLCC. ARCENT provided ADCON over all Army forces deploying into the AOR and sustainment support to Army, joint, and multinational forces engaged in the operation (including ASOS, CUL, and AEA functions). ARCENT opened the theater, established aerial and seaports of debarkation (APODs/SPODs) and organized base support areas in Saudi Arabia and in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This is consistent with the current Sustainment Concept of Support (developed and implemented several years after Desert Shield) and the theater army roles and responsibilities for supporting the GCC’s requirements across the AOR and in support of JOAs opened within the AOR, as set forth in this FM. ARCENT executed these Army support functions even though it did not have a theater sustainment command or other theater enabling commands (TECs) subsequently provided under the modular Army designs.

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2-9. The early phases of Desert Shield provide a scenario to examine options for employing the theater army CCP as a forward command post for immediate response to a crisis. In limited intervention operations such as deterrence or show of force, the very act of deploying an operational command post to a forward location is provocative and may strongly influence the behavior of potential adversaries. It is both a demonstration of political will to confront potential adversaries as well as a practical preparatory measure to establish forward command and control capabilities for the initiation of military operations should deterrence fail. Coupled with the rapid deployment of even a token combat force (in this case, the Ready Brigade of the 82nd ABN Div), the timely deployment of a forward command post is powerful tool for deterrence. The theater army CCP design facilitates its use for immediate response to unanticipated crises and is a viable option in this scenario. Even for operations like Desert Shield, where an extended build-up of forces was expected, the CCP could have been employed effectively as the nucleus of an early entry forward command post for either CENTCOM or ARCENT. The CCP could have provided C2 for the immediate response force until reinforced or relieved by a warfighting headquarters capable of commanding and controlling sustained operations (Army division or corps).

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2-10. In scenarios similar to Desert Shield, the CCP could be used to form the nucleus of a JTF headquarters, with several options available to the GCC. The GCC could designate the theater army as the JTF HQs, with the theater army commander dual-hatted as both the ASCC and JTF commander. Another option would be for the GCC to task the theater army to provide the CCP and its personnel to form the core of an ad hoc JTF headquarters under the command of the GCC or other designated senior officer (i.e. another component commander or the GCC’s DCG). The theater army, with its CCP, could also be designated the JFLC or operational ARFOR (with direct OPCON of forces) under a JTF for smaller scale contingency operations. The theater army retains its responsibilities for ADCON, ASOS, AEA, CUL and all Army service functions (Title 10, USC) even if the theater army commander commands the JTF, JFLC or operational ARFOR. The CCP would provide the current operations command post functions, relying on the theater army MCP (and TECs) for planning, analysis and coordination support. The MCP would focus on sustainment support for Army and joint forces, both AOR-wide and within the JOA.

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2-11. The second example, from Operation Assured Response, offers a historical scenario in which the theater army CCP’s immediate response capability could have been effectively employed. It also offers an example of how one headquarters (in this case Special Operations Command – Europe or SOCEUR) formed the special CJTF which initiated the operation, and was subsequently relieved by a second headquarters (MEB) – a situation contemplated for the CCP in cases where the operation extends beyond the CCP’s designed endurance (greater than 30 days). Finally, Operation Assured Response provides an example of circ*mstances in which the JTF forward command post established itself outside the area of operations – a likely scenario for CCP deployments.

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2-12. For Operation ASSURED RESPONSE in Liberia, forces from the Republic of Georgia, Italy, and Germany joined with U.S. special operations, Air Force, Navy, and Marine forces to conduct a noncombatant evacuation operation. In early 1996, gunmen filled the streets of Monrovia, Liberia as the country split into armed factions’ intent on seizing power. The situation worsened as faction members took hostages.

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2-13. On 9 April 1996, President Clinton ordered the U.S. military to evacuate Americans and designated third party foreign nationals. In rapid response, the Army deployed Special Forces, an airborne infantry company, signal augmentation, and a medical section as part of a special operations task force from Special Operations Command–Europe, known as JTF ASSURED RESPONSE. Refer to Figure 2-3. NEO Operation: Operation Assured Response and Figure 2-4. NEO Operations Monrovia, Liberia below.

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Figure 2-3. NEO Operation: Operation Assured Response 2-14. Phase I consisted of setting up an Initial Staging Base (ISB) in Freetown, Sierra Leone (190 Nautical Miles from Monrovia, Liberia). The ISB would house the HQ, JTF Assured Response and the airhead to facilitate the helicopter evacuations from the US Embassy in Monrovia. The evacuees would then be 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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transloaded into C130s for onward movement to the established safe haven of Dakar, Senegal (496 Nautical Miles from Freetown).

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2-15. Phase II began when the JTF assumed operational control of the forces required to execute the operation and received and reassembled the helicopters for airlift of the SOF into Monrovia and evacuees out of Monrovia.

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2-16. Phase III consisted of Army forces entering into Monrovia’s Mamba Point embassy district where they established security for international relief agencies headquartered there. Additional Army forces reinforced Marine guards at the American embassy and secured the central evacuee assembly collection point. Navy helicopters then flew the evacuees to Sierra Leone with further evacuation to safe haven, Dakar, Senegal, via C-130s.

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2-17. The final Phase IV would be end of NEO and the redeployment of forces.

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2-18. The combined capabilities of the Army, other Services, and multinational troops evacuated 2444 U.S. and foreign citizens from 73 countries from Liberia demonstrating the effectiveness and importance of synchronized joint, multinational operations.

Figure 2-4. NEO Operations Monrovia, Liberia

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EMPLOYENT OF THEATER ARMY IN OPERATION ASSURED RESPONSE AND SIMILAR SCENARIOS

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2-19. Operation Assured Response provides a NEO scenario to examine employment options for the CCP. Historically, US European Command (EUCOM), utilizing its assigned Special Forces component (SOCEUR) to form the initial CJTF headquarters, conducted the operation. The subsequent establishment of U.S. Africa Command with U.S. Army Africa as its ASCC raises questions regarding the relevance of the historical EUCOM command and control structure. The main question is how AFRICOM and USARAF approach an Operation Assured Response scenario given their lack of theater-committed forces. The discussion that follows will examine the scenario from the perspective of AFRICOM and USARAF and their current reality in which they do not have immediately available theater-committed forces.

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2-20. Special Operations Command Europe (SOCEUR) used organic C2 elements in the formation of HQ, JTF ASSURED RESPONSE (JTF AR). However, lacking the theater-committed headquarters and subordinate forces readily available for crisis response, AFRICOM’s options are more limited. USARAF, with its CCP, is both immediately available and capable of commanding and controlling these types of 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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operations involving limited numbers of units, small force packages, and operations of limited duration. The theater army CCP could form the nucleus of a small JTF headquarters, commanded by the USARAF commander or other senior officer designated by the GCC. The force packages required to execute the evacuation operations (security, aviation, airlift, medical treatment & sustainment) must come from sources outside the AOR.

EXAMPLE NUMBER 3: HURRICANES GEORGES AND MITCH – DISASTER RELIEF/ FOREIGN HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE Figure 2-5. Disaster Relief/Foreign Humanitarian Assistance 2-21. The theater army’s CCP is well-suited to provide C2 for Army and/or joint forces engaged in Humanitarian Assistance or Disaster Relief (HA/DR). Department of Defense (DOD) normally has a supporting role in HA/DR operations, with the US ambassadors/Chiefs of Mission posted to the affected host nations and US Department of State (DOS) as the US government agency lead. However, exceptions do exist. Two exceptions are the U.S. Mission is not functional because of damage or the host nation government collapses and the country descends into anarchy. In such extreme cases, the operation often changes from HA/DR to other forms of international intervention. This was not the case in the fall of 1998 when Hurricane Georges and Hurricane Mitch devastated several countries and the US Territory of Puerto Rico within weeks of each other. See Figures 2-5. Disaster Relief/Foreign Humanitarian Assistance, Figure 2-6. Hurricane Georges 15 SEP 1998, and Figure 2-7. Hurricane Mitch 22 OCT 1998. These scenarios are useful for exploring the options available to the GCC for CCP employment. These scenarios provide useful examples of how very small JTFs deal with specific country situations, with a higher JTF providing centralized planning and coordination of DOD support to inter-agency efforts and Unified Action plans. All this conducted under environmental, diplomatic and political circ*mstances that vary widely between affected host nations (compare the diplomatic challenges of deploying U.S. military forces into Nicaragua for disaster relief to the relatively benign diplomatic environment in Honduras). See Figure 2-5. Disaster Relief/Foreign Humanitarian Assistance for paths of Hurricanes.

Figure 2-6. Hurricane Georges 15 Sep.98

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2-22. In the fall of 1998, two devastating hurricanes (Hurricanes Georges and Hurricane Mitch) hit within a four-week span in the Caribbean and Central America areas affecting both foreign territories and U.S. territory (especially Puerto Rico). These two hurricanes yielded a substantial number of deaths and injuries with widespread property damage. U.S. military forces, specifically within the USSOUTHCOM AOR, 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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mounted large-scale responses to these disasters, in conjunction with the affected countries, civilian relief agencies of the United States government (USG), foreign governments, the UN, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), private businesses, and individuals. The SOUTHCOM Commander created two joint task forces (JTFs) for disaster response, reoriented the mission of a third JTF toward relief efforts, and employed more than 7,000 U.S. military personnel deployed to the region to assist with the response to the damage caused by these events.

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2-23. For Hurricane Georges, U.S. military assistance focused on civil support operations in Puerto Rico, in support of Federal Emergency Management Authority (FEMA) and HA/DR in the Dominican Republic, in support of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). U.S. military personnel, stationed in Haiti as part of Support Group Haiti, provided limited assistance in that nation. In the eastern Caribbean islands, the U.S. military provided limited but important support.

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2-24. The DoD asset in greatest demand following Hurricane Georges was air transport; both strategic lift into the area of operations (AO) and theater lift to distribute relief supplies. Another major asset employed was a Disaster Response Joint Task Force (DRJTF), designated JTF Full Provider deployed aboard the USS Bataan with 900 U.S. Marines from the second Force Service Support Group (FSSG). JTF Full Provider coordinated U.S. military support of both Puerto Rico civil support operations and foreign disaster relief in such places as the Dominican Republic. In Puerto Rico, Naval Station Roosevelt Roads (NSRR) became the logistics hub for FEMA relief operations. In the Dominican Republic, the Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) provided essential coordination with the Country Team and host nation military and support at Santo Domingo airport for the relief effort.

Figure 2-7. Hurricane Mitch 22 OCT 98

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2-25. The DoD response to Hurricane Mitch far surpassed the response to Hurricane Georges in scope, complexity, cost, and duration, as well as in the range of policy issues it generated. U.S. military personnel conducted significant relief operations in the four Central American countries primarily affected by Hurricane Mitch: Honduras and Nicaragua, the two most seriously affected nations, and Guatemala and El Salvador, which suffered moderate damage. In each of the affected countries, U.S. military units concentrated their activities in specified geographic regions, assigned through discussions with host governments to complement ongoing host nation and other responses, rather than operating countrywide. U.S. based air and sea military transport assets moved large quantities of personnel and materiel to the AO.

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delivery, immunizations against epidemic diseases, veterinary care, bridge and road reconstruction, water purification, liaison, and planning. During these efforts, DoD personnel interfaced with government officials, international and local NGOs, local and third country military forces, UN agencies, banana plantation owners, local religious and community leaders, and traumatized villagers. Command and control of military forces for the Hurricane Mitch operation initially fell to JTF BRAVO located on Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras. However, the massive devastation in Honduras required JTF BRAVO’s full attention, and a second JTF stood up on the Comalapa Air Base, El Salvador (JTF AGUILA) with subordinate reporting JTFs set up in the counties of Guatemala and Nicaragua. The overall operations consisted of three phases:  Emergency Relief Phase – commencing when the Hurricane struck Central America and continuing through mid-December 1998  Rehabilitation Phase – commencing in mid-December 1998 and continuing until approximately 26 February 1999  Reconstruction Phase (not addressed in this report) – commencing at the end of the Rehabilitation Phase and continuing into September 1999.

Figure 2-8. Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Funded DoD Air Assets

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2-27. The U.S. Government funded assessment teams, and deployed Disaster Assistance Response Teams (DARTs) from the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) to the region. See above Figure 28. Funded DoD Air Assets. These teams provided airlift and sealift to Central America, funded U.S. military helicopter transport within affected areas, and financially supported many local relief efforts of host governments, regional organizations such as the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO), and NGOs.

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2-28. The Hurricane Georges and Hurricane Mitch humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations provide multiple examples for the CCPs effective employment. Deliberately organized to provide the capabilities to monitor and control current operations, the CCP can form the nucleus or core element of a small JTF headquarters. The CCP based JTF receives augmentation from the theater army MCP, the GCC staff and other service component commands to provide the needed capabilities. The CCP is available to command and control the immediate response to crisis to include coordination. Coordination consist of working with U.S. military assistance groups to assess requirements of the U.S. country team, host nation, 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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and facilitate the deployment of disaster assistance response teams (DARTs). Additional coordination is required for the delivery of relief supplies and follow-on disaster relief forces such as U.S. Army engineers, aviation elements, medical treatment teams, and airfield control parties. Given DOD will likely have a supporting role in most HA/DR operations, a CCP-based JTF can manage the coordination of DOD support to multiple countries (through resident U.S. MILGPs and country teams) as well as civil support operations such as the Hurricane Georges effort in Puerto Rico. The CCP design facilitates its use as the nucleus of a smaller subordinate JTF like JTF Aguila in El Salvador. The theater army, with its CCP, provides the GCC with an additional tool to meet the command and control requirements for effective crisis response for HA/DR and other types of limited operations.

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3-1. The Main Command Post (MCP) performs most of the administrative Service functions traditionally associated with the Army Service Component Command. Figure 3-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Main CP Organization.

Figure 3-1. Theater Army 5.4 Main Command Post Organization 3-2. The MCP is primarily responsible for Title 10, administrative control, Army support to other services, and Army executive agent functions in support of the GCC’s area of responsibility (see Annex B).. The theater army is responsible for providing ADCON over all Army forces forward-stationed, transiting or deployed to the AOR and controls Army support to joint, interagency and multinational elements, as directed by the GCC. In most cases, the theater army fulfills these responsibilities by 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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allocating resources and delegating missions to subordinate theater enabling commands or brigades, which conduct the detailed planning and execution (actual delivery of products or services).  The MCP also supports Army, joint, and multinational forces deployed to JOAs established within the AOR. Such support includes theater opening, RSO&I, common user logistics (CUL) and other services associated with Army Executive Agent responsibilities. The vast majorities of these responsibilities are sustainment-related, and performed through the subordinate TSC and /or deployed ESC (Expeditionary Sustainment Command). Other, non-sustainment ASOS/AEA responsibilities of the theater army include the following (see Annex B for a complete listing of ASOS, AEA, and OPLAN/CONPLAN-derived responsibilities):  Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD)  Theater chemical defense  Military working dog program  General engineering  Detention Operations  Military postal services  Civil affairs  Communications  Military support to civil authorities  U.S. military confinement facilities  Mapping, charting & geodesy  Joint combat camera  The MCP is primarily a planning and coordination element, and is responsible for developing and maintaining OPLANS/CONPLANS, and Service supporting plans to the GCC’s Theater Campaign Plan. The MCP may provide command and control over Army forces involved in operations, training exercises, and other theater security cooperation activities. It also conducts collaborative planning with any Army headquarters designated to deploy within the AOR. This collaborative planning support facilitates the transition of existing OPLANS/CONPLANS into the incoming headquarters’ own Operation Orders (OPORDs) for execution, and to provide the theater army’s regional expertise to support to the planning and execution of operations, exercises or other theater security cooperation activities. The MCP provides direct planning support to the CCP when it deploys (as a forward CP) to C2 smaller scale contingency operations or to participate in exercises and other theater security cooperation activities.  As an operational headquarters, the theater army’s normal battle rhythm and work schedule conform to mission requirements and are coordinated with the Geographic Combatant Commander (GCC) headquarters to which the theater army is assigned. However, during steady state operations most of the theater army staff elements typically works a standard workday that conforms to prevailing business work hours of the local community. The Current Operations Integration Cell (COIC) of the Movement and Maneuver Warfighting Functional Cell is an exception to that norm, and is organized to monitor the activities of Army forces within the AOR 24 hrs per day, seven days a week, and 365 days a year, even when the CCP isnot deployed.

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3-3. The MCP staff organization contains elements of both functional and G-staff/special staff design. Functionally, the MCP staff is organized into six warfighting functional Cells which combine certain GStaff and Special Staff Sections into logical functional groupings. The six functional Cells are Intelligence, Movement & Maneuver (M2), Fires, Protection, Sustainment, and Mission Command. The theater army Chief of Staff is responsible for overall supervision of MCP operations, and for organizing and training the staff, in accordance with the commander’s guidance.  Command Group: The theater army command group includes the commander, a deputy commander, the command sergeant major (CSM), the chief of staff (CoS), secretary to the general staff (SGS), the Political Advisor, Science Advisor plus the enlisted and officer aides to the CG/DCG, and administrative staff and drivers.  Personal Staff includes Internal Review, Chaplain, PAO, SJA, Surgeon, Safety, and IG.

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Special Staff (per FM 5-0) includes all staff elements, which are not personal staff or not assigned to a primary coordinating staff section. The theater army special staff includes the following staff Elements: Inspector General (IG), Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), Public Affairs (PA), Knowledge Management, Chaplain, Red Team, Operations Research Systems Analysis (ORSA), Command Liaison Teams (LNO), and Digital LNO Detachments (when applicable). Intelligence Cell: The Intelligence Cell is composed of the Intelligence Operations, Intelligence Control, G2X and Intelligence Support Sections and the USAF Staff Weather Office. The G2 is the Chief of the Intelligence Cell. Movement & Maneuver Cell: The Movement and Maneuver Cell forms the three integrating Cells: Current Operations Integration Cell (COIC), Future Operations (FUOP) Cell, and Plans Cell (See FM 5-0). The G3 is both the Theater Army Operations Officer, responsible for integrating all components of the operation into the theater army’s single, unified operation, and the Chief of the Movement and Maneuver Warfighting Functional Cell. The Movement and Maneuver Cell also is designed with the traditional G3 operations, support, training, security cooperation and force management sections with the numerous elements subordinate to them. Fires Cell: The Fires Cell is composed of headquarters, electronic warfare (EW), and joint fires sections. The Fires Cell Director is the Theater Army’s Chief of Fires. Protection Cell: The Protection Cell is composed of the Provost Marshall (PMO), Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and High Yield Explosives (CBRNE), Air & Missile Defense (AMD), Anti-terrorism/Force Protection, Personnel Recovery, and Safety Staff Sections. The Protection Cell is also responsible for the Operations Security (OPSEC) function. The Chief of the Protection Cell is coded O1C, a multi-functional officer specialty open to MP, Chemical, or Engineer officers. The Corps 4.1 design aligns the Engineer Section under the Protection Cell. The Theater Army design aligns the Engineer section under the Sustainment Cell since its primary duties are sustainment related. The Universal Joint Task List (UJTL) supports this difference by aligning engineer functions under sustainment vice protection. Sustainment Cell: The Sustainment Cell is composed of the G-1/Personnel, G4/Logistics, G8/Financial Management, Engineer and Surgeon Staff Sections. The Chief of the Sustainment Cell is an O-7, General Officer. Mission Command Cell: The Mission Command Cell is composed of the G-7 Information Engagement and G-9 Civil Affairs Sections, as well as the G-6/ Signal Section. The Mission Command Cell is an abstract construction, and does not function in the same manner as the other Warfighting Functional Cells. Although the theater army Commander is, conceptually, the Chief of the Mission Command Cell, the commander does not manage the day-to-day activities of the Cell. As a practical matter, the Chief of Staff is responsible for the day-to-day management and integration of the functions of all component Sections of the Cell. Unlike the other G-staff and functional Cells, ASCCs supported by a Signal Command do not have a permanently assigned G-6/Signal Chief to the theater army headquarters. The commander of the Signal Command (Theater) is dual-hatted as the theater army G-6/Signal Chief in theaters assigned this enabler.

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Figure 4-1. Theater Army 5.4 CCP Organization

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4-1. The Contingency Command Post (CCP) is a relatively lean, deployable element of the theater army headquarters, designed specifically to meet the GCC’s requirements for a limited command and control capability, which is theater-committed and immediately available to respond to a crisis anywhere within the AOR. Figure 4-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 CCP. The real value of the CCP is its immediate response capability rather than its capability to command and control complex or sustained operations. During steady-state operations, the CCP will normally co-locate with the MCP for stationing purposes but, as determined by the Commander or Chief of Staff, the CCP will remain organized as a separate command post. The Chief of Staff establishes and determines CCP’s business rules, battle rhythm, and work schedule based on its assigned tasks and missions, which are distinct from those assigned to the MCP. One example is the planning, preparing, and executing of Joint or Combined exercises. Maintaining the CCP as a separate command post facilitates the training of the CCP staff in their operational command and control functions. The separation enhances the CCP’s ability for rapid response or deployment as well.

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4-2. The CCP is capable of providing command and control of operations within its limitations. Normally, command and control over the execution of operations within the AO will require the CCP to operate continuously 24 hours a day, seven days a week from initiation of the operation until completion or until the CCP is relieved of its mission. The CCP staff elements provide two fully functional 12-hour shifts to operate the Current Operations Integration Cell (COIC). Other staff capabilities, which are not required on a continuous basis, are organized to provide 24/7 on-call services, as required

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4-3. CCP provides the theater army with a capability to directly command and control smaller types of Limited Intervention or Peace operations. These operations can range from contingency assessment to facilitating theater army forward command and control to Non-combatant Evacuation (NEO) or Foreign Humanitarian Assistance, in both permissive and non-permissive environments where major combat operations are not anticipated, to Peace Operations, such as peace enforcement. These operations may involve some combat, but are limited in scale, scope, and complexity and expected intensity and duration. The CCP also provides the theater army commander a flexible command post to meet some Theater Campaign Plan (TCP) related requirements to provide exercise control headquarters for and/or participate in joint and combined exercises with the ground forces of partner nations within the AOR. This is an incidental capability rather than a specific design requirement. The CCP can be tailored and reinforced with additional staff personnel from the theater army’s MCP and/or with staff and capabilities from theater supporting units (e.g., theater signal, medical, civil affairs, sustainment) to meet the METT-TC requirements for either C2 of military operations or TCP-related exercises, exchanges, and other activities. The following sections further describe the CCP’s roles, missions, capabilities, limitations, and dependencies.

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4-4. The CCP provides one of several command and control options available to the GCC and the theater army commander to meet AO-specific requirements for command and control (C2) of Army and/or joint forces conducting military operations within the AOR. The CCP design allows it to be small and affordable, while providing an easily tailored and rapidly deployable C2 capability. It is immediately available to the GCC and theater army commander, to facilitate C2 of a limited range of military operations for a limited duration of time. The CCP cannot function as the primary command post for major operations involving multiple brigade-sized formations operating for extended periods or in intense combat, unless augmented. A variety of sources can provide the needed augmentation - the MCP, GCC staff, other service component commands, and JMD request.

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4-5. Every mission begins with mission analysis, which will determine which of the Army’s available headquarters is most appropriate to the task. Taking fully into account the CCP’s inherent capabilities and limitations, the theater army commander may determine that the CCP is adequate, with or without augmentation, to provide effective command and control over a given mission from start to finish. In some cases, the GCC or theater army commander may determine the CCP is adequate to C2 the operation or provide a forward command post until a more capable headquarters can arrive. The design team determined 30 days of continuous operations is the upper limit of CCP to command and control operations. The 30-day rule is not immutable. The CCP is capable of operating beyond 30-days if augmented or performing relatively simple operations. Thus, the decision on whether or not to employ the CCP for a given mission involves a trade-off between the CCP’s immediately responsive capability, and its known limitations with regard to the scale, scope, complexity, intensity, and duration of operations that it can effectively command and control without significant augmentation.

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4-6. In short, the CCP provides the theater army commander with an organic capability to meet the GCC’s requirements for immediate response to unanticipated crises within the AOR. As an organic element of the theater army headquarters, the CCP is committed to the theater, and immediately available for deployment to command and control operations within an AO.

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4-7. The CCP provides several options for employment. The CCP may be employed within the AOR in a variety of ways, including as the forward command post of the theater army commander providing C2 over Army and/or joint forces; as the nucleus of a small JTF headquarters working directly for the GCC; or in other tailored configurations, which take advantage of the CCP’s flexibility and rapid deployability. In the first case, the theater army may be designated as a JTF headquarters for a Limited Intervention or Peace Operation, and the CCP (with joint augmentation from the GCC or other service components) forms the nucleus of a JTF under the direct command of the theater army commander (who is, himself, subordinate to the GCC). In the second case, the GCC might task the theater army to provide the CCP as the nucleus of a small JTF (probably commanded by the theater army DCG), which would receive augmentation from the GCC in the form of either selective augmentation from the GCC staff, augmentation with the GCC’s Standing Joint Force Headquarters Element (SJFHQ), or with a Joint Manning Document (JMD) tailored to the existing mission. In this situation, the CCP merely provides the personnel and equipment around which a tailored (ad hoc) JTF headquarters is organized, and the operational control (OPCON) of the CCP and its 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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personnel would pass to the designated Joint Force Commander. Other employment options will take advantage of the flexibility, expansibility, and rapid deployability of the CCP to employ it in part or in total to conduct crisis assessments or to function, with augmentation and reachback, as a form of ―mobile command group,‖ integrating with forward-based staff in existing facilities to provide the theater army commander with forward presence and reachback during contingencies where support capacity already exists on location.

CCP ROLES & MISSIONS

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4-8. NEO (non-combatant evacuation operations): The CCP is capable of commanding and controlling NEO, in permissive, uncertain, and hostile operational environments, including missions involving limited combat and security operations (limited in terms of scale, scope, complexity, intensity, and duration).

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4-9. Consequence Management: The CCP is capable of providing the initial command and control for Consequence Management operations, when provided subordinate units with tailored capabilities appropriate to the mission. One example of an augmentation force is the Weapons of Mass Destruction Coordination Elements (WMD-CE) of the 20th Support Command. The command must augment the CCP or replace it with a headquarters more capable of commanding and controlling sustained operations for consequence management.

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4-10. Foreign Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Response: The CCP is capable of rapidly deploying a team to assess HA/DR needs for the theater army or unified commander. The CCP has the capability to command and control foreign humanitarian assistance/disaster response operations, including those in nonpermissive operational environments requiring limited combat or security operations to secure facilities and infrastructure critical to delivery of humanitarian assistance (bases, ports, and roads), protect vehicles, facilities, and personnel of U.S. or other organizations involved in the preparation, storage, and delivery of aid. The CCP can accomplish this task when provided subordinate units with tailored capabilities appropriate for the mission. One example is additional liaison teams to coordinate with USG agencies, Host nation authorities, and international organizations.

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4-11. Peace Operations: The CCP is capable of providing command and control of the initial phases of peace operations -- limited in scope, scale, complexity, intensity and duration – given a set of subordinate elements with appropriate combat capabilities. Peace operations normally involve the deployment of significant military forces for extended or protracted periods of time (Bosnia, Kosovo, and Sinai), for which the CCP is obviously ill suited. It is, however, the CCP’s capability to command and control immediate response forces, which lends itself to a limited role for the CCP in peace operations. This is particularly true where the immediate insertion of US military forces is required to separate two or more antagonists who have mutually agreed to stop shooting at each other. The command must augment the CCP or replace it with a headquarters more capable of commanding and controlling sustained operations for consequence management.

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4-12. Theater Security Cooperation/Building Partner Capacity: The ability to conduct theater security cooperation/ partner building activities is incidental and not a requirement for the CCP. The CCP is capable of commanding and controlling selected Army elements participating in joint and combined exercises with land forces of partner nations within the GCC’s AOR, either as an exercise control headquarters or as a participating unit replicating the command post of other Army warfighting headquarters. The CCP is capable of providing command post and/or staff capabilities tailored to the requirements of specific bilateral wargames, simulations, and Command Post Exercises (CPXs). This capability provides an opportunity to promote inter-operability between US and multinational military forces. Common doctrine and standard operating procedures are a few examples of how these opportunities are beneficial. The CCP can also provide the nucleus of a tailored (ad hoc) command post for Army and/or joint/multinational exercises, including joint augmentation from other services.

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CAPABILITIES 4-13. 24 hour Operations (24/7): The CCP provides full capability to perform all required command and control tasks and functions 24 hours a day, seven days a week, within the previously stated limitations. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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4-14. C-130 Deployable: The CCP and its organic equipment are capable of deploying by C-130 aircraft (intra-theater lift). The ability to deploy quickly to any area within the AOR maximizes the CCP's utility..

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4-15. Span of Command & Control: The CCP is capable of commanding and controlling multiple subordinate units up to brigade size. The CCP increases its span of control for specific mission requirements with augmentation from other theater army headquarters or theater troops. For planning purposes, the CCP is capable of commanding and controlling up to two brigade-sized units or six subordinate elements, which may be any combination of BCTs, functional brigades, battalions or tailored task force packages. The CCP cannot function as the primary command post for major operations involving multiple brigade-sized formations operating for extended periods or in intense combat, unless augmented. A variety of sources can provide the needed augmentation - the MCP, GCC staff, other service component commands, and JMD request. An Army division or corps headquarters provides another option because it possesses the capability to exercise a greater span of control.

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4-16. Linkage to Joint Capabilities: The CCP staff is capable of accessing and employing joint fires within the limitations on combat operations and dependencies listed below. The combatant command, joint or service headquarters provide other joint capabilities and augmentation if necessary. The CCP coordinates additional required capabilities through the MCP.

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4-17. Organic Administrative Support: The administrative and sustainment support for the CCP is provided by the Headquarters Support Company, (HSC) which provides field feeding, supply & sanitation, Role I medical treatment, and level I maintenance to the deployed CCP. It is dependent on the theater army’s headquarters and headquarters battalion for higher echelon support beyond the capability of the HSC.

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4-18. Duration of Operations: The CCP cannot command and control protracted military operations, unless appropriately augmented, reinforced or relieved. As a planning factor, 30 days of continous operations is considered the maximum duration in which the CCP can effectively operate without augmentation.

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4-19. Scale, Scope, Complexity, Intensity: The CCP is designed to command and control military operations of limited scope (range of activities), scale (dimensions of AO, number of units and size of forces), complexity (number of simultaneous, inter-related activities), and intensity (speed, tempo, degree of lethality or destruction within a given timeframe). The CCP must receive augmentation, be reinforced or relieved if the requirements exceed previously stated limitations. The CCP provides the GCC and the theater army commander with a limited, in-house operational C2 capability. It is not, however, the only tool or the preferred tool for all contingencies.

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4-20. The CCP performs current operations/execution functions of an operation, and is dependent upon the Theater Army MCP for operational planning support, intelligence support, sustainment coordination, Special Staff functions, and tailored staff support, as required, for the conduct of military operations within the GCC’s AOR. Although the CCP will actively participate with the MCP planning staff in the collaborative planning process, the MCP will normally produce the OPORDs and the CCP will focus largely on controlling execution of the plan, including short-term assessment of operations.

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4-21. The CCP is dependent upon the MCP for the following:  Planning and coordinating assigned Theater Security Cooperation exercises and other missions (Security Cooperation Section).  General Title 10, ADCON support of the headquarters and any Army units OPCON or attached to the theater army for operations.  Planning and provision of Army Support to Other Services (ASOS), Common User Logistics (CUL), and Army Executive Agent (AEA) services/responsibilities.

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4-22. The CCP is dependent upon the MCP for the following staff functions/services/products: 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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     

Red Team advice & assessment Knowledge Management Inspector General support Staff Weather Officer feeds (weather data) Space support Other Special Staff functions, as required.

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4-23. Signal Command (Theater). The CCP is dependent upon the Signal Command (Theater) for network transport capability, network operations, and content management/content staging. Based on specific mission requirements, the Signal Command (Theater) will provide tailored communication support teams to support the CCP.

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4-24. Theater Military Intelligence Brigade (MIB)  The CCP is dependent upon the theater-level MIB for regionally focused intelligence collection and analysis.  The CCP is dependent upon the Geospatial Information & Services (GI&S) element of the MIB for digital mapping and geodesy.

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4-25. Theater Sustainment Command (TSC)  The CCP is dependent upon the TSC capability and its subordinate ESC for theater opening, RSO&I and the establishment and operation of sustainment activities to support CCP-controlled operations.  The CCP is dependent upon external assets, provided or coordinated by the TSC, for ground movement.

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4-26. USAF TACP. The CCP is dependent upon a USAF Tactical Air Control Party or other appropriate USAF coordination element for the coordination and terminal guidance of close air support, and for the coordination of other tactical air support missions in support of CCP-controlled operations.

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4-27. Intra-theater Airlift: The CCP is dependent upon intra-theater airlift for rapid deployment of the command post within the GCC’s AOR.

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4-28. Security: The CCP has no organic security element, and is dependent upon OPCON/attached subordinate units for the provision of command post perimeter security, access control, and personal security detachment services for the commander, as required by METT-TC.

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Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion

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5-1. The Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHB) provides the administrative and sustainment support to the theater army headquarters, to include the CCP when it deploys for any operation. The HHB is organized with a commander, command group, a battalion staff (S1, S2/3, and S4), and three subordinate companies, described and reflected in Figure 5-1, Theater Army 5.4 HHB Company Organization below:

Figure 5-1. Theater Army 5.4 Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Organization 

Headquarters Support Company (HSC): The HSC consists of a standard company headquarters section, the HHB staff, and the food service, medical treatment, maintenance section designed to deploy with the CCP to provide sustainment support and C2 the local security section provided by an outside organization. Theater army personnel assigned to the HSC include the CG section, DCG section, Personal Staff, CoS section, Special Staff, HHB HQ Staff, CCP Command Group, CCP Special Staff, and CCP Support sections.

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Operations Company: The Operations Company consists of a standard company headquarters section and the personnel assigned to the CO HQ, Movement and Maneuver, Protection, Mission Command (incl. G-6/Signal), Fires, CCP Movement and Maneuver, CCP Protection, CCP Mission Command (incl. G-6/Signal), and CCP Fires. I&S Company (Intelligence & Sustainment): The I&S company is composed of a standard company headquarters Element and the personnel assigned to the Theater Army Intelligence, Sustainment, CCP Intelligence and CCP Sustainment.

5-2. The CCP, and the HSC which supports it, are dependent upon the theater army HHB for all ADCON services and Title 10, USC support.

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Theater Army Command Group

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6-1. Theater Army Command Group. The Command Group is responsible for providing operational direction to Army component forces. It develops and supervises planning, preparation, execution and assessment for a wide range of activities in the GCC’s AOR. The Command Group leads the Army Operations Process (plan, prepare, execute and assess), while participating in the GCC’s Joint Operations Planning Process. The theater army command group consists of the Commanding General (CG) section, Deputy Commanding General (DCG) Command section and the Chief of Staff (CoS) section. Figure 6-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Command Group.

Figure 6-1. Theater Army 5.4 Command Group

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6-2. Commanding General Command Group  Mission: The Commanding General Command Group provides command and control to the theater army, and prioritizes the effort for the staff and assigned units.  Organization: The Command Group consists of the CG, the Command Sergeant Major (CSM), a science officer, and a political military advisor along with an aide-de-camp, and other associated support personnel.  Tasks: The CG directs planning, policy development, programming, and budgeting for theater army Title 10 Army Support to Other Services (ASOS), and Executive Agent responsibilities in the AOR. The CG exercises ADCON of all Army forces in the AOR by providing the administration, support, and force protection of all Army forces in the AOR. The CG directs, leads, and assesses operations using designated Army, Joint, and Multinational forces to support GCC directed missions. The Executive Officer, Aide de Camp, and support staff organizes and coordinates scheduling, activities, travel, staff actions, and logistics support to the CG. The CSM enforces policy and standards for performance, training, appearance, and conduct of Army Enlisted personnel in the AOR. The Political-Military Advisor (POLAD) provides perspectives and policy positions on political-military issues for the CG. The Science Advisor provides analysis and advice on research and development efforts affecting future planning and provides 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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potential materiel solutions to capability gaps. The communications team installs, operates, maintains, and restores assigned equipment in support of the CG.

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6-3. Deputy Commanding General (DCG)  Mission: The DCG serves as second in command of the theater army and extends the control of the CG in designated areas to include commanding the CCP when deployed.  Organization: The DCG section consists of the DCG, Aide de Camp, and the Driver/Communications Specialist. The section deploys with the CCP if directed by the CG.  Tasks: The DCG assists in the planning, policy development, programming, and budgeting for theater army Title 10 Army Support to Other Services (ASOS), and Executive Agent responsibilities in the AOR. The DCG assists the CG in exercising ADCON of all Army forces in the AOR, and assists the CG in driving the operations process. When directed, the DCG assists in directing, leading, and assessing operations using designated Army, Joint, and Multinational forces to support GCC directed missions. The DCG executes his responsibilities from the MCP or from the CCP if directed. His Aide de Camp and driver/communications specialist organizes and coordinates scheduling, activities, travel, staff actions, and logistics support for the DCG.

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6-4. Chief of Staff  Mission: The Chief of Staff (CoS) serves as the CG’s principal assistant for coordinating and training the staff, and establishing and managing the command post.  Organization: The CoS Office consists of a SGS/ Executive Services section (one officer) and a Staff Action section (four NCOs).  Tasks: The Chief of Staff (CoS) directs and supervises the CP support functions of the HHB, and the activities of the staff and LNOs. He directs operations of the Special Staff and the Mission Command Warfighting Functional Cell. He establishes the business rules, workday schedule, and battle rhythm of the headquarters and staff sections. The CoS, with Commander’s guidance, may extend or otherwise modify the business rules and battle rhythm of the headquarters in order to support operational requirements. The CoS supervises the SGS and monitors the preparation for conferences, social events and ceremonies. The CoS directs and monitors collective training of the staff. The SGS manages staff actions, and executive services. He/she monitors support to major conferences. The staff action section processes all staff actions and assists the SGS as needed.

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Theater Army Personal Staff

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7-1. Personal staff members work under the theater army commander’s immediate control as depicted in Figure 7-1, Theater Army 5.4 Personal Staff. However, they also serve as special staff officers when they coordinate with other staff members. When performing their duties as special staff officers, personal staff officers may work through the CoS and under a coordinating staff officer for coordination and control purposes. The theater army commander’s personal staff includes the Chiefs of the following staff sections: Chaplain, Inspector General (IG), Public Affairs (PAO), Safety, Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), Surgeon, and the Internal Review.

Figure 7-1. Theater Army 5.4 Personal Staff

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7-2. Internal Review Section  Mission: The internal review section develops plans, policies, and reports for the review, and audit of the command’s processes and practices to prevent fraud, and abuse of financial resources.  Organization: The Internal Review section consists of a chief and an action officer responsible for performing internal reviews and evaluations.  Tasks: The Internal Review section assists the commander to ensure effective stewardship of the command’s resources and compliance with related laws, policies, and procedures. The section executes reviews, consulting, advising, and liaison task to assist the commander in improving financial management operations. The section conducts an audit compliance function and serves as the theater army’s point of contact for external audit groups. It reports on the external audit group’s findings and conducts follow-up audits, if required.

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8-1. The Chief of Staff directs and synchronizes those special staff sections of the Theater Army that are not coordinated by the primary coordinating staff officers. The special staff supports the commander and designated staff and subordinate commands. Figure 8-1 depicts the special staff. Many special staff offices also have representatives permanently assigned to one of more of the Warfighting Functional Cells. All send representatives to the six functional cells and three integrating cells to assist in conducting operations as required. The Special Staff includes Command Liaison Officers (LNOs), the Operational Research Systems Analysis Section, Knowledge Management (KM), Inspector General (IG), Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), Public Affairs (PAO), Chaplain, and Red Team Sections.

Figure 8-1. Theater Army 5.4 Special Staff

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8-2. Command LNO Section  Mission: The Command LNOs represent the theater army commander at the receiving HQs. The LNO synchronizes coordination between headquarters and relays the commander’s intent and concept for operations.  Organization: The Command LNO staff section consists of ten officers organized into five, twoman teams.  Tasks: The Command LNO section deploys to higher headquarters, Service Component Commands, host nation agencies, multinational partners, interagency and non-government organizations within the AOR, as directed. The LNO Teams coordinate, and synchronize theater army efforts between commands, and the GCC, MCP, and CCP staffs, and other JTF organizations. They assist in coordinating Army support to the joint, interagency, and multinational forces. They advise the gaining headquarters on the capabilities and limitations of Army forces and the most appropriate ways to employ them. The command can request Digital LNO Detachments to provide digital connectivity between the theater army, joint, and multinational forces, if required.

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8-3. Operations Research and Systems Analysis (ORSA) Section  Mission: The Operations Research and Systems Analysis (ORSA) section provides analytic support to the theater army staff for planning and assessment of operations.  Organization: The ORSA section consist a section chief and two action officers.  Tasks: The ORSA section provides quantitative analytic support, including regression and trend analysis, to theater army planning and assessment activities. The ORSA staff assists other staff in developing customized analytical tools for specific requirements, provides a quality control capability, and can conduct assessments to measure the effectiveness of operations.

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8-4. Knowledge Management (KM) Section  Mission: The Theater Army Knowledge Management (KM) section supports the commander and staff in achieving situational understanding and making informed, knowledgeable, and timely decisions through the integration and management of Army Battle Command Systems and various other collaboration tools.  Organization: The KM section in the MCP consists of three officers and one NCO.  Tasks: The KM section advises the staff on KM processes and enabling technologies. The section facilitates the creation, collection, organization, storing, application and transfers knowledge by using innovative technology to facilitate situational understanding and decisionmaking. The section assists the commander and staff in integrating battle command systems into the headquarters processes consistent with KM best practices. The section coordinates with the G-6 for technical network requirements and analysis of new KM information technology for increased KM capabilities. It assists the staff in managing the common operational picture and briefings.

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8-5. Inspector General (IG) Section  Mission: The Theater Army Inspector General (IG) section acts as an extension of the Commander’s eyes, ears, voice, & conscience while conducting inspections, assistance actions and investigations for all ADCON Army forces lacking organic Inspector General support.  Organization: The Theater Army IG Section consists of six officers and eight NCOs.  Tasks: The Command Inspector General (IG) is the local proponent and advisor on Army Inspection Policy as outlined in Army Regulation (AR) 1-201. The Command Inspector General serves as Personal Staff to the theater army Commander. The section perform all four IG functions: Inspections, Assistance, Investigations, Teaching and Training. The IG staff provides services to all Army forces in the AOR lacking organic IG support. The section augments the CCP operations based on mission requirements.

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8-6. Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) Section  Mission: The Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) section serves as the principal legal advisor to the commander, staff, and subordinate organizations.  Organization: The SJA Section consists of ten officers, one warrant officer and five NCOs.  Tasks: The section advises the commander and staff on all matters pertaining to law, policy, regulation, and good order and discipline in the AO. The SJA Section participates in the Operations Process and other subordinate processes, including the MDMP planning process and D3A targeting process. The section allocates its subordinates between participating in theater army planning sessions, preparing or participating in boards, bureaus, centers, cells, and working groups, and supporting the CCP when deployed.‖ The International and Operational Law Division provides legal advice and support regarding the application of international law and agreements, U.S. law, customs and activities affecting military operations. The Military Justice Division provides legal advice and support for the administration of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The Chief of Claims provides legal advice and support for the investigation, processing, adjudication, and settlement of claims on behalf of and against the United States worldwide. The Chief of Legal Assistance provides personal civil legal services to eligible personnel. The Administrative and Civil Law Division provides legal advice and support for the establishment, command, and functioning of military organizations and installations, related military and civil authorities. The Contract and Fiscal Law Division provides legal advice and support for the application of domestic statutes and regulations related to the funding of military operations and support to nonfederal agencies and organizations.

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8-7. Public Affairs Office (PAO) Section  Mission: The Theater Army Public Affairs Office (PAO) section advises the commander and expedites the flow of accurate and timely information about the activities of U.S. Army and U.S. joint forces to external population and internal audiences.  Organization: The PAO staff section consists of four officers and four NCOs. The PAO Staff Section executes two primary functions: Media Operations and Public Affairs Plans/OPS. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Tasks: The PAO section advises the commander and staff on all aspects of public affairs planning, information strategies, media facilitation, and training. The section provides advice on community relations issues and operations. The section provides advice on the use of command information print and broadcast (radio/TV) capabilities. The PAO coordinates public affairs planning and operations, media facilitation and NGO requests with subordinate, adjacent and higher headquarters as required. The section responds to media queries, plans and coordinates media visits and media embed requests. A Public Affairs Operations Center and a Mobile Public Affairs Detachment must augment the PAO section to establish a media center and conduct wartime or crises PA operations.

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8-8. Chaplain Section  Mission: The Command Chaplain provides staff supervision over all Army Religious Support (RS) operations in the theater.  Organization: The Command Chaplain Section consists of three officers and two NCOs. The Command Chaplain is a personal staff officer to the theater army commander. The section consists of the Command Chaplain and a Senior Chaplain Assistant; Operations and Training element that monitors manning and readiness, plus a World Religious staff element that conducts analysis and planning.  Tasks: The Command Chaplain and Senior Chaplain Assistant provide the commander with pastoral care, personal counseling, confidential communications and recommends religious support (RS) policy for the Command. The Command Chaplain plans, coordinates, supervises, religious support and policy for the AO. The section coordinates religious support for displaced persons and plans religious support for reconstitution. It advises the commander and staff on all religious, moral and morale matters within the command. It ensures that policies and leadership practices of the command are in keeping with the highest moral, ethical, and humanitarian standards. The section develops and integrates religious support into training events and exercises. The section conducts continuous tactical, operational, and strategic World Religions (WR) analysis and training. It provides guidance on the conduct of Religious Leader Liaison missions, and advises the command and staff on regional religions.

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8-9.

Red Team Section Mission: The Red Team section provides the Commander an independent capability to explore alternatives in plans, operations, concepts, organizations, and capabilities in the context of the operational environment from the perspectives of adversaries, partners, and others.  Organization: The Red Team consists of four officers. A regional Foreign Area Officer augments the team as well as the supporting Military Intelligence Brigade.  Tasks: Red Team supports decision making by providing assistance in problem framing, challenging assumptions and providing alternatives during planning and operations. The Red team assists in identifying friendly and enemy vulnerabilities and opportunities to include assessment tools to gauge progress. The Red Team anticipates cultural perceptions of partners, adversaries and others in planning and operations. The Red Team conducts critical reviews of theater army estimates, plans, and orders. The team attends appropriate boards, cells, centers, and working groups. The Red Team primarily interacts with the planning group at the MCP , by participating in each phase of the MDMP and/or Campaign Design. During execution of operations, the Red Team identifies the impacts and potential consequences (2nd/3rd order effects) of proposed or ongoing actions. 

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Theater Army Intelligence Cell

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9-1. The Theater Army Intelligence Cell is responsible for the synchronization and integration of Intelligence operations throughout the AO. The Cell's sections and elements either embed or coordinate with the staff to facilitate this synchronization. Figure 9-1 depicts the Theater Army Intelligence Cell. The Intelligence Cell is dependent on the Theater Military Intelligence Brigade for intelligence collection, single source analysis, and all source fusion to meet the theater army’s intelligence needs. The MCP Intelligence Cell consists of an Intelligence HQs Section, an Intelligence Operations section, an Intelligence Control section, a G2X section and an Intelligence Support section.

Figure 9-1. Theater Army 5.4 Intelligence Cell

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Mission: The Cell conducts policy formulation, planning, programming, budgeting, management, staff supervision, force integration, evaluation, and oversight for all intelligence activities in support of theater army forces. The cell advises the commander on the best use of all intelligence forces in the command. Tasks: The Intelligence Cell provides functional oversight of subordinates, other intelligence staff personnel, and assigned or attached units. It manages theater intelligence collection, production, dissemination, disclosure, and counterintelligence requirements. It provides staff supervision of the United States Air Force (USAF) Staff Weather Element. The Cell coordinates for National Intelligence support. It executes intelligence engagement and Theater Security Cooperation as required.

9-2. Intelligence Cell Headquarters Section

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Mission: The section provides management, direction and priorities to the cell plus provides information and recommendations to the theater army commander. Organization: The Headquarters Section consists of a chief, an Intelligence SGM and an intelligence analyst. Tasks: The section develops policy, planning, staff supervision, force integration, evaluation, and oversight for intelligence activities. The section determines and prioritizes requirements, allocates resources, identifies issues, evaluates activities, provides information and recommendations.

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9-3. Intelligence Operations Section (IOS) and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Intelligence Operations section (IOS) manages intelligence collection and dissemination processes to meet AO operational requirements.  Organization: The IOS consists of the following elements: Headquarters, ISR Operations, SIGINT, GEOINT, Requirements, and Staff Weather Office (SWO). The Headquarters Element consists of a section chief and senior operations NCO.  Tasks: The IOS supervises the processing, reporting, and dissemination of theater and national intelligence to ensure Combatant Commander daily operational requirements are satisfied. The IOS coordinates for theater operations collection and analysis. The section manages the theater army's intelligence requirements, sets MIB collection, analysis, and production priorities and recommends the allocation of intelligence assets to satisfy theater army intelligence needs. The section evaluates MIB intelligence products and disseminates all-source intelligence to the theater army staff. It collaborates with the Theater Operations Company (THOC) and, Regional Operation Company (ROC) for prioritization of analytic requirements as required. The section manages information requests for national level access and products based on mission needs. The section manages, validates, approves, and disseminates the threat Common Operating Picture (COP) to higher, lower, and adjacent commands and agencies. He advises the commander and subordinate units on the enemy, weather and terrain.

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9-4. Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance Operations Element  Mission: The Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations element prioritizes and processes intelligence information requirements, and maintains the enemy common operational picture.  Organization: The ISR Operations Element consists of an Intelligence Officer, All-Source Intelligence Technician, Senior Intelligence Sergeant, Intelligence Sergeant, and an Intelligence Analyst.  Tasks: The ISR Operations element develops, maintains, tracks, and manages the friendly Intelligence COP. The element produces intelligence products to answer requests for information (RFI) from the theater staff, GCC, and Multinational partners. It establishes the theater army indications & warning (I&W) requirements, plus monitors and reports on the achievement of I&W thresholds. The element prepares combat assessments and provides the theater army commander with increased situational awareness and a clearer vision of the AO. It satisfies the theater army commander’s critical information requirement (CCIR), priority intelligence requirement (PIR), and information requirements (IR). It develops and submits requests for information (RFI) to answer Requirements Element inquiries.

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9-5. Signal Intelligence (SIGINT) Element  Mission: The Signal Intelligence (SIGINT) element provides guidance to the command on the implementation of United States Signals Intelligence Directives (USSID) and Executive Order 12333.  Organization: A SIGINT Technician and SGT manage the SIGINT element.  Tasks: The element coordinates and analyzes SIGINT collection, analysis, and reporting activities. The section assesses the quality and relevance of SIGINT reporting, and recommends tasking, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TPED) adjustments to the Requirements element as necessary. The element receives and monitors resource status reports (RSR) for SIGINT systems to support friendly intelligence COP development. It maintains direct liaison 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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with the National Security Agency (NSA) Cryptologic Support Group (CSG), Intelligence Security Command (INSCOM), sister services, national cryptologic services and US country teams for technical information and guidance. It develops SIGINT estimates, plans, and orders for theater army operations and exercises. The element provides SIGINT information for allsource product development. It provides SIGINT perspective to CCIR, PIR, and IR development in support of the requirements management process. It integrates national agency, joint service, and coalition SIGINT products.

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9-6. Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) Element  Mission: The Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) element manages GEOINT interpretation activities.  Organization: The GEOINT Element consists of a GEOINT Technician (W3) and a GEOINT Analyst (E7).  Tasks: It coordinates, tasks, and supervises Geospatial intelligence and Geospatial Information and Services (GI&S) support to joint force commanders, sister services, interagency, and multinational forces. The element integrates agency, joint, service, and multinational GEOINT products, and conducts direct coordination with collection and production organizations. The element assesses the quality of GEOINT reporting and recommends tasking, processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TPED) adjustments as necessary. The element receives GEOINT resource status reports to support friendly intelligence COP development. The element develops GEOINT estimates, plans, and orders for theater army operations and exercises. It provides GEOINT perspective to CCIR, PIR, IR development and requirements management.

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9-7. Requirements Element  Mission: The Requirements element synchronizes, coordinates, and integrates theater army intelligence requirement activities.  Organization: The Requirements Element consists of two All-Source Analysis Technicians, and two Intelligence Analysts.  Tasks: The element develops and coordinates the theater army’s collection requirements for joint, service, agencies, and multinational organizations. The element allocates and coordinates intelligence resources. The element develops PIR and IR to support operational and contingency plans and requirements. It manages intelligence RFIs and specific orders and requests (SOR) processes. The element maintains visibility of collection assets and assesses their effectiveness. It identifies collection gaps and provides mitigation strategies to support current and future operations. The element assists in the identification of indicators to satisfy PIR/IR and tasks collection assets as necessary. It develops intelligence synchronization plans and coordinates ISR input to the staff’s orders process. The element advises the intelligence operations section on the optimal allocation of ISR collection assets.

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9-8. Staff Weather Office (SWO) (USAF) Element  Mission: The Staff Weather Office (SWO) element provides full-range weather support to the theater army.  Organization: The SWO element consists of two Air Force Weather Officers.  Tasks: The element provides standard weather observations, forecasts, and warning support to forces in the AO. It provides weather products to the staff for special operations mission and planning. The element monitors the effects of weather on operations. It tailors weather support products to support OPLAN and CONPLAN development and maintenance

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9-9. Intelligence Control Section (ICS)  Mission: The Intelligence Control Section (ICS) develops intelligence policy, plans, and orders. It manages force management and operational needs statement processes related to intelligence.  Organization: The ICS consists of two Strategic Intelligence Officers, two All-Source Intelligence Officers, an All-Source Intelligence Technician, and a Senior Intelligence SGT.  Tasks: The intelligence control section develops and maintains intelligence input to theater army estimates, plans and orders. It coordinates and integrates the Intelligence Security 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Cooperation (ISC) mission (e.g., mil to mil). The section manages intelligence force management and operational needs statement issues. It develops the capstone Intelligence policy and TTP in coordination with the combatant command. The section coordinates and participates in intelligence support to exercises. It develops the theater intelligence plan in coordination with the combatant command and National agencies. The section acts as the theater army proponent for ISR. It provides input to the integrated priority list, ISR review and Joint Strategic Planning System. It reviews and recommends task organization and allocation of forces to support plans and orders.

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9-10. G2X Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The G2X Section advises the Commander and senior intelligence officer on the employment of Counter and human intelligence assets.  Organization: The G2X Section consists of the following elements: Headquarters, HUMINT Operations, CI Coordinating Authority Element, and an Operational Support Element. The Headquarters Element consists of one Section Chief.  Tasks: The G2X section synchronizes and integrates all national to tactical level counter and human intelligence assets in the AO for all operations. The G2X is the primary advisor to the commander on the employment of all CI and HUMINT assets, to include laws, policies, and regulations affecting CI and HUMINT operations. The section directs, supervises, and coordinates the planning, collection, analysis, and dissemination of CI and HUMINT intelligence.

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9-11. Human Intelligence Operations (HO) Element  Mission: The Human Intelligence operations element (HO) manages human intelligence (HUMINT) operations.  Organization: The element consists of a HUMINT collection technician.  Tasks: The element provides policy, plans, and oversight for HUMIT operations in the AO. The element coordinates and synchronizes HUMIT operations with joint, interagency, intergovernmental, service and multinational organizations. The element develops and assigns HUMINT mission tasks. The element reviews and approves document translations, plans, and missions, and participates in the production and dissemination of intelligence information.

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9-12. Counter-intelligence Coordinating Authority (CICA) Element  Mission: The Counter-intelligence Coordinating Authority (CICA) element manages counterintelligence investigations and operations in the AO.  Organization: The CICA consists of a CI Technician.  Tasks: The element provides policy, plans, and oversight for counter intelligence operations in the AO. The element coordinates and synchronizes counter intelligence operations with joint, interagency, intergovernmental, service and multinational organizations. The element develops and assigns count intelligence mission tasks. The element prepares, reviews, and approves investigative and operational reports and participates in the production and dissemination of intelligence information.

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9-13. Operational Support Element (OSE)  Mission: The Operational Support Element (OSE) manages support to counter and human intelligence operations in the AO.  Organization: The operational support element consists of two counter intelligence officers.  Tasks: The element performs administrative support for CI and HUMINT operations. The element plans, directs, manages, and participates in the collection, production and dissemination of CI information. The element develops CI and HUMINT operations support for detainee operations with regard to policy, programs, and oversight. It provides staff oversight to locally employed personnel screening activities. It validates and assigns CI and HUMINT mission tasks through G3 channels, and manages theater representative credentials (HUMINT) to include badging. The element monitors CI and anti-terrorism reporting in theater. As required, the element conducts CI investigations and operations. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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9-14. Intelligence Support/Foreign Disclosure Office Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Intelligence Support/Foreign Disclosure Office Section (ISS/FDO) provides oversight of linguists, SCI network security, and foreign disclosure and SCIF oversight for the theater army.  Organization: The ISS/FDO consists of the following elements: HQs, Linguist, System Administrator, and Special Security Office. The Headquarters Element consists of a section chief and Operations NCO.  Tasks: The ISS/FDO Section reviews and validates Army requirements for linguists, manages sensitive compartmented information (SCI) and communications technology, and is responsible for managing the disclosure of classified information to foreign agencies. The section develops SCI procedures, and controls, plus the establishing and disestablishing of all theater army SCIFs. The section provides oversight of the special security office’s use, dissemination, storage, and security of SCI materials, equipment, and systems. The section oversees the procedures for handling sanitized or de-compartmentalizing final version intelligence products prior to dissemination outside of the SCIF and or U.S. channels. The section oversees the management of the Special Access Program (SAP).

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9-15. Linguist Element  Mission: The Linguist Element is responsible for the management of the theater army’s linguist program.  Organization: The Linguist element consists of a chief, HUMINT collection technician and an all-source intelligence analyst.  Tasks: The Linguist element reviews, validates, and prioritizes linguists support requirements. It serves as the alternate Contracting Officer Representative (ACOR) for Army language contracts. The element tracks linguist personnel and monitors their performance. It anticipates the theater army’s linguist needs when developing contract statements of work. The Linguist element monitors and enforces contract requirements. It conducts mission analysis and identifies specified or implied tasks requiring foreign language support.

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9-16. Systems Administrator (SYSAD) Element  Mission: The Systems Administrator (SYSAD) element establishes connectivity with outside Elements, maintains internal and external digital network function, and exercises security oversight.  Organization: The SYSAD Element consists of a chief and a senior LAN Manager.  Tasks: The SYSAD Element manages sensitive compartmented information (SCI) communications and information technology. It establishes and maintains internal and external security measures in compliance with plans, policies, and guidance. The element designs, operates and maintains SCI communication systems, and networks and their interface with external networks. The element performs SVI data control and bulk storage operations.

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9-17. Special Security Office (SSO) Element  Mission: The Special Security Office (SSO) element establishes, controls, and disestablishes all theater army sensitive compartmented information facilities (SCIFs).  Organization: The SSO Element consists of an officer.  Tasks: It develops SCI procedures, and establishes, controls, and disestablishes all theater army SCIFs. The element provides classification and foreign disclosure guidance for SCI intelligence and operations products. It controls all SCI materials, and reviews intelligence prior to its dissemination outside a SCIF. The element manages the Special Access Program (SAP).

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10-1. The Theater Army Movement and Maneuver (M2) Cell is responsible for the synchronization and integration of theater army operations throughout the AO. Figure 10-1 Depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Movement and Maneuver Cell. The Movement and Maneuver Cell uses the future operations, current operations and plans cells to drive the operations process and enable the integration and synchronization of operations in the AO. Representatives from all Warfighting Functions embed or coordinate with these integrating cells to develop a coherent, unified theater army operation. The three integrating Cells are under the staff supervision of the G-3/DCS for Operations.

Figure 10-1. Theater Army 5.4 Movement and Maneuver Cell 10-2. Movement and Maneuver (M2) Cell  Mission: The Movement and Maneuver Cell synchronizes and integrates theater army operations throughout the AO.  Tasks: The Movement and Maneuver Cell synchronizes all current operations in order to provide the command with the COP and facilitate command and control of theater army assets within the GCC’s AOR. The Cell provides the MCP with limited near-term planning element to develop Branches and produce WARNORDs, OPORDS, and FRAGOs to support the current phase of execution. It develops and prepares plans, strategy, policy that supports GCC tasked supporting plans, and implements the operations process to plan, prepare, execute and assess the command's exercise, simulation and training programs. The Movement and Maneuver Cell

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plans, coordinates and executes all international engagement and security cooperation for the theater army as directed by the GCC TSCP and theater army commander’s initiatives. Processes: The Movement and Maneuver Cell, through its three integrating Cells, drives and directs the Operations Process and other subordinate processes, including the MDMP/JOPP planning processes, the D3A targeting process with the support of the Geospatial Planning Cell (GPC), risk assessments and IPB. The Cell allocates its subordinate Divisions/Branches between participating in theater army planning sessions, preparing or conducting Working Groups, Boards and Cells, and supporting the CCP when deployed. The G3 not only integrates operations and actions within the Movement and Maneuver Cell but also integrates all other Warfighting Functional Cells into support for Operations.

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10-3. Movement and Maneuver Cell Headquarters Section  Mission: The Headquarters Section manages the cells integration and synchronization of operations in support of theater army requirements.  Organization: The section consists of a G3, an Operations SGM, and a NCO/Driver.  Tasks: The section integrates and synchronizes all aspects of theater army operations across all Warfighting Functional cell and through the three integrating cells: current operations, future operations, and plans. The section provides information and recommendations to the theater army commander. The section manages information flow, and integrates LNOs and joint force augmentation into the staff.

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10-4. Operations Support (OPS SPT) and Headquarters Section  Mission: The Operations Support Section (OPS SPT) executes orders management, task organization, and CCIR development tasks and manages update briefs to ensure the command stays synchronized.  Organization: The OPS SPT section consists of the Headquarters, Aviation and Space Elements.  Tasks: The section conducts orders management task. The section manages the Battle Rhythm through update briefs to ensure the command stays synchronized. It publishes orders assigning missions to theater army subordinates while overseeing the execution of tasks as needed. The section also provides the necessary reach-back for the CCP. The section assesses the operational and tactical situation, develops CCIR, and supervises the task organization of theater army subordinate units. The section establishes and operates the Current Operations and Integration Cell (COIC) on a continuous basis and ensures it possesses all required operational functions.

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10-5. Aviation Operations Element  Mission: The element manages aviation operations, and standardizes aviation safety planning for theater operations.  Organization: The element is composed of a chief, an aviation standardization officer, an aviation safety officer and a NCOIC.  Tasks: It provides aviation standardization and aviation safety policies and support to assist ISR, sustainment, force protection, airspace control, and C2 operational planning. The element monitors parallel collaborative planning with combatant commands, joint task forces, corps or divisions, major subordinate commands, and joint, interagency, and multinational forces. The element provides aviation qualified staff officers and NCOs to participate on Army and joint boards, integrated planning teams (IPTs), working groups and centers as needed. The element also conducts mobilization, deployment and redeployment planning. The element ensures task organization of all subordinate aviation forces is completed, and recommends changes to aviation operational standardization and safety TTPs, policies and processes. It reviews aviation staff estimates, safety of flight messages, proposed TTP changes, and AOR flight procedures guide.

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10-6. Space Element  Mission: The Space Element plans, integrates, and coordinates space-based capabilities and products (national, military, and commercial) to support theater army command and control to ensure mission accomplishment. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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 

Organization: The element consists of a senior space operations officer and two space operations/plans officers. Tasks: The element plans, integrates, and coordinates with USASMDC/ARSTRAT or the Joint Functional Component Command-Space for space input to estimates, plans, orders and operations. It coordinates full exploitation of military and civilian space platforms for intelligence, focused surveillance, area reconnaissance, communications, and early warning. The element coordinates for position and timing (PNT); Blue Force Tracking (BFT); combat identification and precision engagement support. It coordinates for integrated tactical warning and attack assessment; environmental monitoring, and dynamic tasking of space platforms. The element facilitates augmentation by space forces when required and ensures reachback to all supported forces.

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10-7. Current Operations and Integration Cell (COIC)  Mission: The Current Operations and Integration Cell (COIC) conducts short-range planning, issues orders, and monitors, assesses, collects and processes relevant operational information to produce and disseminate a common operational picture (COP).  Organization: The COIC is composed of seven officers and three NCOs. If required, the COIC receives augmentation from the staff to expand the COIC’s capability to plan, prepare, execute and assess operations.  Tasks: The COIC uses plans, and orders to integrate, synchronize and supervise AO operations. The COIC communicates operational and strategic-level information, maintains current force status, and evaluates information to assess their impact on operations. The COIC monitors and coordinates activities involving the reception and onward movement of Army forces in the AOR. It determines the operational impacts of delayed or diverted shipments for strategic movement. The COIC manages the RFI process for the headquarters. The section analyzes higher, adjacent, sister service and multinational orders for task affecting the theater army. The cell manages the establishment, and operation of the common operational picture (COP).

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10-8. Future Operations (FUOPS) Cell  Mission: The Future Operations (FUOPS) Cell refines and modifies plans and orders based on current situation, develops Branches and assesses mid-range progress of operations, typically within a 24-96 hour planning window, or as established by the commander.  Organization: The cell is composed of the chief, six functional plans officers and one NCO. If required, FUOPS receives augmentation from the staff to expand the cell’s capability to plan, prepare, execute, and assess operations.  Tasks: The cell manages the Global Force Management process for the theater army to include Requests for Forces (RFF) from both internal and external sources. It manages GFM Deployment Orders (DEPORDs) and modifies OPLANS to OPORDs for crisis action planning. It is responsible for mid-range planning and the assessment of operations. It develops OPORDs for smaller scale contingency operations commanded and controlled by the CCP. It provides a mid-range planning element to develop branches and produces WARNORDs, OPORDS, and FRAGOs to support the current phase of execution.

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10-9. Plans Cell and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Plans cell develops long-range theater plans, policy and strategy in support of the theater army commander, typically beyond a 96 hour planning window or as established by the commander.  Organization: The Plans Cell consists of the following elements: Headquarters, Strategy and Policy, Plans, JOPES, and Special Technical Operations (STO). The Headquarters Element consists of a Division Chief, Operations Officer and Senior Operations NCO.  Tasks: The cell is responsible for developing long-range theater plans, policy and strategy for the theater army commander in support of the GCC. It reviews the current situation, assesses national and theater strategies, and reviews national and international security considerations for possible implications for AO operations. It prepares staff estimates and develops courses of action in support of the GCC theater strategy, campaign plans, OPLANS, and OPORDS. The 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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cell participates and collaborates during contingency, crisis action, and campaign planning to develop theater army supporting plans. It issues planning guidance, operational direction and assigns tasks for subordinate unit’s planning. The cell develops deception plans.

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10-10. Strategy and Policy Section  Mission: Strategy and Policy Section provides a running assessment of the theater strategic environment and analysis of U.S. strategic policy to theater army commander. The section assists in the development of regional programs and policies in support of Phase 0 operations.  Organization: The section is composed of element chief and a plans officer.  Tasks: The section reviews the current situation, assesses national and theater strategy, and reviews national and international security considerations for the AO from the theater army’s perspective. It assists the plans element in developing staff estimates and courses of actions for OPLANS and policy that support the GCC’s theater strategy, campaign plans, OPLANS, and OPORDS. The section reviews and provides analysis, comment and summation of the Unified Command Plan, and Guidance for the Employment of Forces (GEF). It determines Army force and structure requirements to support GCC OPLANS and theater strategy. It provides advice on force structure of theater army TOE/MTOEs, APS realignment, and QDR.

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10-11. Plans Section  Mission: The Plans section develops theater army OPLANs and CONPLANs in support of GCC requirements IAW Guidance for Employment of Force (GEF), Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP), and HQDA. The cell focuses on long-range assessments of current operations.  Organization: The Plans Cell is composed of seventeen personnel: one Cell Chief, one deputy chief, eleven plans officers, one request for forces management officer, one airspace management warrant officer and two senior operations sergeants.  Tasks: The Plans Cell determines theater warfighting requirements, solutions, and concepts by developing and coordinating the theater army portion of GCC OPLANs and CONPLANs for major and small-scale contingency operations to include joint and multinational forces. It incorporates military deception into the plans in order to manipulate enemy operational commanders’ perceptions and expectations to conceal friendly actions. It determines theater army force size and structure requirements by developing and coordinating theater army force requirements and issuing planning guidance. The cell combines plans from other MCP staff Elements into one integrated planning document. Additionally, the Plans Cell coordinates and integrates component, theater, and other support to ensure mutual understanding, integration, and support. It executes this task by coordinating with higher and adjacent commands. It reviews higher headquarters policy and publications for their impact on the theater army’s support to projected campaigns or major operations. The Plans cell provides policy, tasks, and guidance on the development of subordinate unit supporting plans, The Chief of Plans is responsible for developing theater army OPLANS and CONPLANS in support of GCC OPLANS, OPORDS, and campaign plans for the AOR. He provides leadership and supervision to the cell, various operational planning groups and teams when activated. The Deputy Chief of Plans assists the Chief and serves as lead planner for plans and projects. He ensures work and projects within the cell are properly coordinated both internally and externally. The assigned plans officers coordinate and synchronize operations into the theater army operations plans and CONPLANS in support of GCC OPLANS, OPORDS and campaign plans for the AOR. The Senior Operations Sergeant First Class assists the Chief of Plans Cell with day-to-day operations. He supervises the administrative support to the various operational planning groups and teams when activated.

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10-12. Joint Operations Planning and Execution System (JOPES) Section  Mission: The JOPE Section establishes procedures for the development and execution of timephased force and deployment data (TPFDD) throughout the planning continuum to include, exercises.  Organization: The section is composed of one chief, one operations officer, one transportation management NCO and four information NCOs. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Tasks: The section manages the JOPES, TPFDD, and request for forces (RFF) processes for the theater army. The section coordinates with the Strategy and Policy Element and Plans Cell for force requirements, mobilization, and deployment plans. The section enters theater contingency and operations plans are entered into the JOPES system. The section operates and maintains the global command and control system (GCCS) and global command and control system-Army (GCCS-A) systems for the theater army. The section develops the TPFDD for theater army OPLANS and OPORDS. The section conducts transportation feasibility analysis during TPFDD development.

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10-13. Special Technical Operations (STO) Element  Mission: The element plans, coordinates and integrates STO into theater army plans, operations, and exercises and facilitates the execution of STO and other sensitive activities.  Organization: The element consists of a chief and an NCO.  Tasks: The STO Element plans, integrates and coordinates all aspects of STO with the rest of the staff and maintains the STO estimate. The element advises the theater army commander and staff on STO plans, policies, and activities conducted in the AOR. The element coordinates with combatant commands, services, and joint staff STO offices for support and approval of STO activities as required. It supports sensitive operational and planning activities within the Army HQ and subordinate units as required. It performs security management and administrative functions to support STO activities.

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10-14. Training Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Training section plans, prepares, executes and assesses the command's exercise, simulation and training programs.  Organization: The section consists of the following elements: Headquarters, Exercise, Simulations, and Training. The HQs Element consists of a chief, an operations NCO and a supply NCO.  Tasks: The section plans, coordinates, directs and executes training and exercises for the theater army. It deploys within the AOR to support theater army training and exercises. It monitors available training facilities and areas for readiness. The section accounts for simulation equipment within the AO. The section plans, prepares, executes, and assesses the theater army’s service, joint, interagency, and multinational training and education programs. It supervises the planning and coordination for all Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) and GCC directed exercises. The section monitors the deployment and employment of theater forces and supporting RC forces in the execution of exercises and training events throughout the AOR.

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10-15. Exercise Element  Mission: The Exercise element plans, prepares, executes, and assesses the theater army HQ's service, joint and multinational training and education programs.  Organization: The Exercise element consists of two Plans and Exercise Officers.  Tasks: The element provides guidance for training individual replacements and units. The element certifies the readiness of units deploying into the AOR as part of the RSO&I process. The element provides the commander with a capability to conduct mission rehearsal and mission planning using models and simulations. It prepares regional cultural and environmental awareness training packages for units deploying into the AOR. It monitors the readiness and adequacy of training facilities and training areas available to the command and assesses their effectiveness. The element provides exercise planning and execution for simulations supporting the theater security cooperation strategy.

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10-16. Simulation Element  Mission: The Simulations element plans, prepares, and executes mission rehearsal and planning for responsive models and simulations.  Organization: The Simulations element consists of a chief, operations officer, and an information system management officer.

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Tasks: The element supervises and manages the overall simulation and training support programs. The element determines the requirement for simulation models supporting the various Army, Joint, Multinational, and AOR partners. It supervises and manages the automation equipment and networks used during simulations supporting training and operational events.

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10-17. Training Element  Mission: The element plans, prepares, executes, and assesses professional education and training programs. It allocates resources by providing guidance on the methods and means used in training replacements and units.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, an aviation training officer, two operations officers, one training officer, a plans officer, an ammunition warrant officer, two master gunner NCOs, and an operations NCO.  Tasks: The element supervises and manages command training programs, overseas deployment, and individual training. The element monitors the readiness of training facilities and training areas to assess adequacy for training events. The element coordinates with tactical units for range certification, and pre-deployment training standards. It conducts supportability assessments for alternative employment options. They develop and maintain exportable training packages to include ones addressing cultural and physical environments found within the AOR. The element manages training ammunition, Mission Essential Task List development, and training program assessments. They conduct staff and pre-exercise training. They plan and direct training and certification of selected personnel on U.S. and multinational emergency action procedures.

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10-18. Force Management Section (FMS) and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Force Management Section (FMS) directs and executes documentation, modernization integration and readiness functions for the theater army commander.  Organization: The section consists of the following elements: Headquarters, Force Structure, Force Integration, and Readiness. The headquarters element consists of a chief and a readiness officer.  Tasks: The section provides continual daily requirements determination, prioritization and resource distribution for the theater army, subordinate units and ARFOR(s) through periodic B2C2WG and automated processes. It serves as the conduit between HQDA, and ARFOR(s) within the AOR for determination and processing of requirements. It manages MTOEs and TDAs through cyclic processes associated with the Army Structure Message (ARSTRUC), Total Army Analysis (TAA), Command Plan (CPLAN) and Program Objective Memorandum (POM) processes. It compiles and submits ARFOR, Unit Status Reports (USRs) within the AOR to HQDA.

1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917

10-19. Force Structure Element  Mission: The element manages all force modernization task for the theater army. It manages input for program budget guidance, and addressing command initiatives.  Organization: The element consists of a chief and two force structure officers.  Tasks: The element conducts special MTOE and TDA studies and analysis. It publishes and distributes command MTOEs and TDAs in coordination with staff elements. The element manages force structure functions in accordance with the TAA process. It manages MTOEs and TDAs in accordance with AR 71-32 and AR 570-4. It develops, coordinates, and carries out force structure plans, programs, policies, procedures, and standards to include those of joint, multinational, interagency or NGO organizations. The element determines manpower and equipment requirements for the activation, inactivation, reorganization or modernization of the force.

1918 1919 1920

10-20. Force Integration Element  Mission: The element executes tasks for unit activation, inactivation, reorganization, or force modernization. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928

 

Organization: The element consists of an element chief and five force modernization officers. Tasks: The element executes tasks for unit activation, inactivation, reorganization, or force modernization. The element prepares input for the command’s operating budget. The element executes coordination and oversight of unit set fielding activities. It manages all theater army HQ operational needs statements and rapid fielding requests to include those for maintenance. The element represents the theater army during the integrated priority list (IPL) development process. The element serves as the integrating agency for software blocking plans, execution, and certification.

1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934

10-21. Readiness Element  Mission: The element compiles and analyzes all unit status readiness reports.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, and a senior NCO.  Tasks: The Readiness element manages the assignment of unit identification codes for the theater army. It updates and inputs unit status and Army Force Registration reports into the appropriate databases.

1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948

10-22. Security Cooperation Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Security Cooperation Section (SCS) plans, coordinates and provides staff supervision over the execution of all international engagement and security cooperation activities in support of the Theater Security and Cooperation Plan(TSCP).  Organization: The section is comprised of twenty Soldiers organized into the following elements: Headquarters, Training and Exercise, and International Military Affairs (IMA).  Tasks: The section provides strategic and operational guidance on all Army exercises, training and other interaction with host nations in order to build defense relationships. The sectionplans and supervises the execution of all bilateral and multinational training events for the theater army through the Training and Exercises Element. The section interacts with host nation militaries and provides politico-military support to other nations, groups, and government agencies operating in the AOR. The SCS uses an assessment and engagement framework to coordinate with country teams for the implementation of Army tasks under the theater security cooperation plan.

1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961

10-23. Plans and Exercise Element  Mission: The Training and Exercise Element plans, prepares, executes, and assesses the theater army’s participation in exercises designed to foster joint and multinational relations in the supported combatant command’s AOR  Organization: The Plans and Exercise Element is comprised of a chief, four plans and exercise officers, one sustainment planner, and one intelligence planner.  Tasks: The element plans, prepares, executes, and assesses the theater army’s participation in exercises designed to enhance operational readiness and foster joint and multinational relations in the supported combatant command’s AOR. It plans, prepares, executes, and assesses training exercises and other security cooperation activities in coordination with various staffs across DoD, DoS, host nations or multinational partners. The section provides exercise planning and execution expertise in support of the supported combatant command’s theater security cooperation plan.

1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971

10-24. International Military Affairs (IMA) Element  Mission: The International Military Affairs (IMA) Element provides politico-military support to Army warfighting headquarters commanding and controlling operations within the AO. IMA coordinates the provision of politico-military support to authorized governments and groups within supported JFC's JOA.  Organization: The element is comprised of twelve Soldiers organized into three regionally focused elements of four officers each.  Tasks: The IMA Element conducts foreign area studies and maintains running estimates on the capabilities, vulnerabilities, trends and outlooks for partner nation military establishments and local and regional threat assessments and forecasts. The element conducts liaison between U.S. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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military forces, local authorities, and non-government organizations. It prepares and integrates international military affairs considerations into operational plans and orders. It develops cultural awareness products for inclusion into exportable training support packages for Army and Joint forces operating in the AO. The element provides limited translator services for Army forces operating within the AO. It advises commanders and staffs on relevant cultural issues and political considerations for each country and inter-country relations within the AOR.

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Chapter 11

1981

Theater Army Fires Cell

1982 1983 1984 1985 1986

11-1. The Theater Army Fires Cell plans, coordinates, integrates and synchronizes the employment and assessment of all strategic theater fires, including Command and Control Warfare, in support of current and future theater operations. The Fires Cell chairs the Joint Targeting Coordination Board and may participate in various other boards, working groups, and meetings. The Fires Cell consists of a HQs Element, Joint Fires Section and Electronic Warfare Section as depicted in Figure 11-1. Theater Army 5.4 Fires Cell.

Figure 11-1. Theater Army 5.4 Fires Cell

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

11-2. Main Command Post (MCP) Fires Cell  Mission: The Main Command Post (MCP) Fires Cell plans, coordinates, integrates and synchronizes the employment and assessment of strategic theater lethal/non-lethal fires and Command and Control Warfare with the Joint Fires Element of the GCC, other components, and deployed Army Combat Forces in support of current and future Army theater-wide operations.  Tasks: The MCP Fires Cell participates in the theater targeting process for engaging strategic targets with lethal/non-lethal fires and Command and Control Warfare. It establishes Army theater targeting guidance, develops recommended Army theater high payoff and high value targets, and provides theater strategic target recommendations to the CCDR for attack. The cell coordinates, integrates and assigns joint, interagency and multinational firepower to targets/target systems. It synchronizes theater strategic firepower to include Army, joint, interagency, and multinational component air assets, special operations forces, attack helicopters, maritime gun and missiles, Army rockets and missiles, and Command and Control Warfare (physical attack, electronic warfare, and computer network operations). The cell conducts theater electronic attack; conducts theater combat assessments (battle damage, munitions effects, re-attack requirements); develops planning guidance and coordinates precision engagement counter countermeasures; provides target intelligence for theater planning and execution and coordinates with the Battlefield Coordination Detachment (BCD) collocated with the respective Air Operations Center.

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

11-3. Fires Cell and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Fires Cell plans, and coordinates theater command and control warfare and lethal/nonlethal fires in support of theater army plans.  Organization: The element consists of a Chief of Fires/ fire support coordinator (FSCOORD), an operations sergeant major and fire support NCO/driver.  Tasks: The element coordinates and manages theater army fire support activities and command and control warfare. The element coordinates staff activities with other staff sections, manages 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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operations, information flow, and personnel within the cell. The element receives and integrates LNOs and joint force augmentation. The section maintains digital system connectivity and manages the Fires Common Operational Picture.

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028

11-4. Joint Fires Section  Mission: The Joint Fires Section prepares and develops plans and orders for the employment and assessment of theater lethal/nonlethal fires in support of current and future campaign, contingency, and Theater Security Cooperation (TSCP) plans.  Organization: The section consists of a c, fires plans officer, field artillery intelligence warrant officer, and a fire control sergeant.  Tasks: The Joint Fires Section supports MCP planning requirements and participates in all theater wide planning cells. It provides reachback to the CCP for fires planning. It conducts theater wide fires planning for all campaign, contingency and TSCP, and develops the fires portion of all plans and orders. The section identifies high-payoff and high-value strategic targets. It recommends targeting objectives, targets and target sets, priorities and guidance to support campaign and contingency planning.

2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

11-5. Electronic Warfare (EW) Section  Mission: The Electronic Warfare (EW) Section conducts theater Command and Control Warfare planning and conducts external integration, and synchronization of EW actions to include Electronic Attack, Protect and Warfare Support. .  Organization: The section consists of a chief, EW operations and plans officer, and a Signals Intelligence/EW Support Warrant Officer.  Tasks: The section coordinates and integrates joint, multinational, interagency Command and Control Warfare support to the theater army. It determines national and agency Command and Control Warfare capabilities and limitations. It also coordinates host nation and multinational Command and Control warfare support, and plans theater electronic attack. The section nominates networks for attack and exploitation and plans for computer network defense ICW the G-6. It develops the recommended Command and Control Warfare targeting objectives, targets and target sets, and priorities and guidance to support campaign and contingency planning. It Identifies and prioritizes high payoff and high value Command and Control Warfare strategic targets. It predicts, integrates, and synchronizes the effects of friendly and enemy EW with the Intelligence Cell and the G-6/Signal Section. The section provides reach back capability for the CCP. When directed the Section serves as the Jamming Control Authority.

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Chapter 12

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Theater Army Protection Cell

2049 2050 2051 2052 2053

12-1. The Theater Army Protection Cell plans, develops, integrates and synchronizes operational protection programs, policies and plans within the AO to preserve the force. Figure 12-1 depicts the protection cell. The cell ensures the twelve protection tasks and associated systems are integrated into all operations and exercises. The cell leads the composite risk management process to identify and reduce risk and assist decision making for operations.

Figure 12-1. Theater Army 5.4 Protection Cell

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12-2. Protection Cell  Mission: The Protection cell plans, develops, integrates and synchronizes operational protection programs, policies and plans within the theater army AO to preserve the force.  Tasks: The Theater Army protection cell provides protection input to numbered OPLANS, CONPLANS, OPORDs and specific functional plans, and serves as the HQDA, CCDR, and ASCC (when applicable) conduit for the dissemination and integration of protection policy and guidance at the operational level of war. It plans, assesses and provides staff oversight of protection functions and resources. It provides reach-back and surge capability for deployed CCP, monitors Theater Protection AT/FP situations and requirements, and provides MP, AMD, CBRNE, and PR planning and functionality into all operations. The Cell conducts collaborative and parallel planning with GCC and AMD Section, provides CBRNE technical advice concerning HQDA and GCC CBRNE requirements, and incorporates Composite Risk Management into orders and operations.

2068 2069 2070 2071 2072 2073 2074 2075 2076

12-3. Protection Cell Headquarters Element  Mission: The Headquarters Element provides management, direction and priorities for the cell to support theater army requirements.  Organization: The Theater Army Protection Cell HQ consists of the Protection Chief, Protection Operations SGM and driver.  Tasks: The element determines and prioritizes requirements, allocates resources, identifies issues, evaluates activities, provides information and recommendations. The Protection Cell Chief provides leadership, direction and guidance to the Protection Cell. The Chief coordinates and integrates protection support for joint, interagency, and multinational organizations.

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12-4. Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection Section

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 

Mission: The Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection (AT/FP) Section establishes plans, programs, and policies focused on the prevention, detection and mitigation of terrorist activity and attacks against DoD forces. Organization: The section consists of a chief, one engineer operations officer and one physical security NCO. Tasks: The section develops and manages theater programs and plans for Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection (AT/FP). The section plans and coordinates the execution of specialized AntiTerrorism and Force Protection (AT/FP) operations in the AO. It coordinates terrorism threat, vulnerability, criticality and risk assessment for installations, camps and troop concentrations. It oversees AT implementation and execution for theater security cooperation program. The section develops plans to prevent acts of espionage, sabotage, and terrorism. It coordinates with HN and local government forces for the protection of friendly assets and personnel. It coordinates terrorism counteraction analysis, and threat analysis for U.S. installations, camps and troop concentrations. It provides detailed physical and theater security planning within the AO. It advises the theater army commander on AO force protection condition (FPCON) requirements and reporting. He/she establishes AO policy for force protection and AT construction standards. The section develops plans, policies, and procedures for physical security throughout the AO. It provides oversight and reviews inspections and assessments of unit’s physical security posture within the AO.

2097 2098 2099 2100 2101 2102 2103 2104 2105 2106 2107 2108 2109 2110 2111

12-5. Provost Marshal Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Provost Marshal (PM) Section plans, coordinates and synchronizes military police operations for the effective utilization of military police assets.  Organization: The section consists of twelve personnel organized into four elements.  Tasks: The section performs theater army Title 10, ASOS, and executive agent responsibilities for military police operations. The section provides guidance and monitors the implementation of theater army military police (MP) policies, programs and orders. It conducts criminal investigations requiring Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and MP investigative support. It conducts Police Intelligence Operations, and establishes linkages to local police agencies and other law enforcement agencies. The section conducts law enforcement and vulnerability countermeasures, and establishes policy concerning Customs and Contraband operations. The section coordinates with external organizations for augmentation forces and assistance in the form of investigative support, Military Working Dogs, Law & Order Detachments, and Internment and Resettlement. The section coordinates and conducts police engagement with multinational, host nation, and civilian police authorities in support of operations.

2112 2113 2114 2115 2116 2117 2118 2119 2120 2121

12-6. Operations Element  Mission: The Operations Element coordinates with the theater army staff and external organizations to synchronize military police (MP) support in the AO.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, operations officer and an operations senior NCO.  Tasks: The element develops and manages MP input to estimates, plans, and orders. The section monitors the execution of MP operations in the AO. The element ensures MP specific administrative and logistical support is available to deployed MP forces supporting operations or exercises. The element coordinates for training and material enhancements to MP forces located in the AOR. The element provides theater army guidance on non-lethal tactics, weapons, ammunitions, effects and systems.

2122 2123 2124 2125 2126 2127 2128 2129

12-7. Internment/Resettlement (I/R) Element  Mission: The Internment/Resettlement (I/R) Element develops plans, policies and orders to ensure I/R considerations are included in force protection efforts.  Organization: The element consists of a chief and one I/R NCO.  Tasks: The Internment and Resettlement (I/R) Element manages DoD Enemy Prisoner of War (EPW), Internee and Detained Personnel (DP) programs. The element plans, coordinates, provides, and facilitates staff supervision for the following: detainee operations, populace /resource control, U.S. military prisoner confinement, and dislocated civilian resettlement. It 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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coordinates multinational support for I/R operations, coordinates support to populations during noncombatant evacuation operations, and provides detainee reporting and data management.

2132 2133 2134 2135 2136 2137 2138 2139 2140 2141 2142 2143 2144 2145 2146 2147

12-8. Law and Order (L&O) Element  Mission: The Law and Order (L&O) Element develops plans, and coordinates L&O operations in the AO.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, a Police Intelligence Warrant Officer, a Senior Military Customs Inspector NCO, a Military Working Dog Program NCO, and a Criminal Intelligence NCO.  Tasks: The element plans, coordinates, facilitates, and provides staff supervision for the execution of Law and Order operations throughout the AO. Law and order operations consist of the following: law enforcement, criminal investigations, traffic operations, host nation police support, customs, and police intelligence operations. It coordinates support for the following: Patrol, Military Working Dog, counter-drug, customs, and protective service operations. It provides support to federal agencies for civil disturbances, immigration emergencies, and law and order operations for the AO. The element provides theater law enforcement and criminal investigation data management for the AO. The element manages the crime prevention program for the AO. It manages Military Working Dogs (MWD) used by contract security in the AO. It conducts joint, interagency, intergovernmental and multinational police coordination and liaison.

2148 2149 2150 2151 2152 2153 2154 2155 2156 2157 2158 2159

12-9. . Air and Missile Defense (AMD) Section  Mission: The section develops plans, and policy for AMD synchronization in support of the theater army AO.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, one operations officer and a NCO.  Tasks: The AMD Section coordinates operational-level AMD with Theater AMD representatives, and other Service HQs, while serving as the primary operational and planning link between the CCDR, the theater army, and HQDA for AMD related issues and policies.The section develops AMD input to support theater army estimates, plans, and orders. It produces and maintains AMD defense designs based on recommended AMD priorities. It assists Air Space Management and Fires planners, as required. The section gathers intelligence, maneuver, and logistical graphics and control measures products to support AMD planning. The section plans, integrates and synchronizes apportioned AMD assets with maneuver requirements.

2160 2161 2162 2163 2164 2165 2166 2167 2168 2169 2170 2171 2172 2173 2174 2175 2176

12-10. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, High Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Section  Mission: The CBRNE Section develops a comprehensive program focused on all aspects of CBRNE /WMD within the AOR. It develops policy/plans to support the NMS-CWMD at Theater level.  Organization: The section consists of a chief and one senior EOD NCO.  Tasks: The section provides contingency planning, analysis, coordination and staff supervision across the AOR for CBRNE operations. The section plans and monitors consequence management operations. It provides input for CBRNE force management and TPFFD processes. The section coordinates and integrates CBRNE support with external organizations such as the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and the United States Army Nuclear and Combating WMD agency. It monitors WMD sensitive site exploration operations in the AOR. The section develops and refines plans covering toxic industrial materials and proper protocols and procedures to mitigate and remove the hazard. It develops estimates, plans and orders to coordinate CBRNE defense measures and provides warning and reporting. It synchronizes the use of obscurants in the AOR. It develops plans and policies for explosive ordinance disposal in the AO. The section maintains the theater reserve of CBRNE equipment and monitors AOR WMD and arms control activities.

2177 2178 2179 2180

12-11. Operational Security (OPSEC) Section  Mission: The Operational Security (OPSEC) Section plans, coordinates, integrates, synchronizes, reviews and refines OPSEC policies for the AO.  Organization: The section consists of an OPSEC officer. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Tasks: The section organizes and manages the OPSEC program to include oversight of subordinate’s programs. It recommends critical information lists and essential elements of friendly information (CIL/EEFI) to the commander. The section publishes an SOP with a minimum of CIL/EEFI and appropriate OPSEC measures. The section conducts OPSEC reviews of documents, interviews, contracts, DD Form 254, websites, and any other material that discusses work related information prior to release for public distribution.

2187 2188 2189 2190 2191 2192 2193 2194 2195 2196 2197 2198

12-12. Personnel Recovery (PR) Section  Mission: The Personnel Recovery (PR) Section integrates PR guidance into mission planning and accomplishing Title 10 PR responsibilities.  Organization: The section consists of an Aviation Officer and one Warrant Officer.  Tasks: The section plans, coordinates, synchronizes, monitors and manages personnel recovery missions in the AO. It integrates data from the Intelligence Warfighting Functional Cell to continually refine and update personnel recovery efforts. The section monitors, tracks, and reports on subordinate organization’s personnel recovery operations. The section reviews and updates PR programs and SOPs. The section oversees the Isolated Personnel Report (ISOPREP) program. The section manages personnel recovery training, doctrine, and logistics for the theater. The section assist subordinate commands in the development of their personnel recovery program.

2199 2200 2201 2202 2203 2204 2205 2206 2207 2208 2209 2210 2211 2212 2213

12-13. Safety Section  Mission: The Safety Section provides strategic safety planning and composite risk management oversight for the theater army.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, one safety officer and one Aviation warrant officer. The Section Chief is part of the theater army commander’s personal staff.  Tasks: The section reviews orders, operations, and exercises to ensure that composite risk management is incorporated. It conducts safety reviews and refines safety plans and orders for implementation. The section conducts safety program evaluations, and conducts accident investigation as necessary. The section reviews lessons learned, as well as accidents and incidents from subordinate units to update safety policies and programs. The section provides and coordinates accident investigation and reporting for the following; explosives safety management, contracting, chemical, radiation, system, industrial, range, marine, and port safety. It also coordinates accident investigation and reporting for the following; marine activities, safe cargo operations, emergency planning and response, workplace inspections, training and tactical safety.

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Theater Army Sustainment Cell

2216 2217 2218 2219 2220 2221 2222 2223 2224 2225 2226 2227 2228

13-1. The Theater Army Sustainment Cell integrates the diverse and separate functions of the G-1, G-8, G4, Surgeon and Engineer Sections to include the common tasks and systems (people, organizations, information, and processes) that commanders use to accomplish missions and training objectives. It involves many of the technical specialties and activities enumerated under the ART 4.0 categories of maintenance, supply, field services, and some transportation tasks, human resource support (HRS), financial management (FM), Army Health Support (AHS) and Engineering Facilities and Construction. The theater army is responsible for planning and providing a wide range of functions and services to include Title 10, ASOS, and AEA. Figure 13-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Sustainment Cell. The supported force may be joint, interagency, intergovernmental or multinational. The theater army provides support to contractors, civilians (including refugees and disaster victims), or members of non-governmental organizations if required. Theater enabling units plan and execute the delivery of these services, in most cases. The Theater Army Sustainment Cell consists of a Headquarters, G-1 Section, G-4 Section, G-8 Section, Surgeon Section and an Engineer Section.

Figure 13-1. Theater Army 5.4 Sustainment Cell

2229 2230 2231 2232 2233 2234 2235

13-2. Sustainment Cell Headquarters Element  Mission: The Headquarters Element manages and synchronizes sustainment operations for the theater army commander.  Organization: The HQs Section consists of the Sustainment Chief, the NCOIC, and a driver.  Tasks: The element determines, and prioritizes requirements, allocates resources, and provides information and recommendation to the commander for sustainment.

2236 2237 2238 2239

13-3. G-1 Division and Headquarters Section  Mission: The G-1 ensures the readiness and operational capabilities of forces by properly planning, prioritizing, coordinating, integrating, and managing theater army and/or joint level HR support. Figure 13-2 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 G-1.

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Figure 13-2. Theater Army 5.4 G-1

2240 2241 2242 2243 2244 2245 2246 2247 2248

Organization: The G-1 Section consists of the Manpower Section and a Plans, Operations, Programs and Policy Section. The G-1 HQs Element consists of the Section Chief, a Human Resources SGM and a Junior NCO. Tasks: The G-1 Section develops and promulgates human resources (HR) policy, plans, priorities and procedures for the theater. A few examples are casualty and postal operations, strength reporting, and the Rest and Recuperation (R&R) and the Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs. The Cell provides operational oversight of HR support and training programs.

2249 2250 2251 2252 2253 2254 2255 2256 2257 2258 2259 2260 2261 2262 2263

13-4. Manpower Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Manpower Section establishes policy for and manages the theater army awards and personnel readiness programs for the AOR.  Organization: The Manpower Section is comprised of a HQ Element and three additional Elements: Awards and Actions, Individual Augmentation, and Personnel Readiness Management. The HQs Element has a Section Chief, Strength Accounting Officer and Senior Human Resources NCOIC.  Tasks: The Manpower Section establishes, manages, and executes theater army awards and decorations programs. It monitors and reports personnel readiness of units within the AOR. It manages personnel readiness of the theater army headquarters, which includes personnel augmentation. The section executes the following tasks: conducts unit readiness and personnel distribution analysis, distributes casualty and replacement plans, and manages the rotation policy. It assists in reconstitution and reorganization efforts and monitors theater casualties. In conjunction with the Human Resources Sustainment Center, it conducts theater-level strength reporting analysis, and establishes and monitors the theater army deployed personnel database.

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13-5. Awards and Actions Element

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  

Mission: The Awards and Actions element establishes, and manages the theater army’s awards program. Organization: The Awards and Action Element is comprised of a Personnel Officer and a HR NCO. Tasks: The element supports the G-1 in building, generating, coordinating, and sustaining Army and or joint awards and personnel actions programs, policies, and procedures. It provides regulatory guidance on awards and personnel actions in coordination with subordinate commands. The element coordinates and monitors actions forwarded to the Department of the Army for approval. The element coordinates congressional actions and line of duty investigations.

2275 2276 2277 2278 2279 2280 2281 2282 2283 2284 2285

13-6. Individual Augmentee (IA) Management Element  Mission: The Individual Augmentee (IA) element establishes policy and manages the IA process for the theater army.  Organization: The IA management element is comprised of one officer and one NCO.  Tasks: The IA Element coordinates and manages individual augmentation for theater forces. It reviews, analyzes, and processes man-power requests for active component, ARNG, USAR, and retiree recalls filling WIAS positions. The element coordinates with HQDA, HRC, and commands on the deployment process and priorities for personnel placement in contingency operations based on Joint Services and SECDEF priorities of fill. It assists and manages personnel actions to include extensions and renewal of position requirements. The element manages and maintains the Army portion of joint manning documents.

2286 2287 2288 2289 2290 2291 2292 2293 2294 2295 2296 2297 2298 2299

13-7. Personnel Readiness Management Element  Mission: The personnel readiness management element manages personnel readiness for theater army forces in the AOR.  Organization: The personnel readiness management element consists of an Element Chief, Strength Accounting Officer, Readiness Officer, a Military Personnel Warrant Officer and two Senior Human Resources NCOs.  Tasks: The element assists the operations element and headquarters section in building, generating, coordinating, and sustaining theater army officer and enlisted management programs, systems, policies, and procedures. The element manages readiness, replacement, and accountability of officers and enlisted personnel. It manages strength reporting, reconstitutes forces, and receives subordinate JPERSTAT. It analyzes, compiles, and submits JPERSTAT reports and compares them with theater personnel databases. The element assists in USR reporting. It downloads, reviews, and publishes results of promotion lists, and processes strength related personnel actions.

2300 2301 2302 2303 2304 2305 2306 2307 2308 2309 2310 2311 2312 2313 2314

13-8. Plans and Operations Programs and Policy Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The plans and operations programs, policy section provides the theater army with current operations support, planning, Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) and postal support.  Organization: The plans, operations, programs and policy section consists of four elements. They are HQ, current operations, MWR, and postal. The HQs Element consists of a Section Chief and Senior Human Resources NCO.  Tasks: The Plans, Operations, Programs and Policy Section facilitates the tracking and management of HR operations in the AOR. It maintains a G-1 common operating picture. It provides HR representation for theater army planning and exercises. It develops and coordinates future HR plans and operations. The section in coordination with the Human Resources Sustainment Center (HRSC) participates in joint operational planning (JOPES). It conducts casualty operations and replacement policies and planning. It develops R&R policy, synchronizes MWR activities, and provides oversight for casualty operations. The section manages and oversees theater postal operations including the development and integration of policies and procedures.

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  

Mission: The Current Operations Element provides HR coordination and oversight of current operations. Organization: The Current Operations Element consists of two Human Resources Officers. Tasks: The Current Operations Element, in coordination with the Human Resources Sustainment Center, executes HR planning and operations. It provides policy guidance and staff supervision for HR operations. It conducts analysis of human resource and casualty operations. It provides HR input for estimates, plans, and orders. It integrates non-combatants evacuation into analysis and plans. The element supports the G-1 in building, generating, coordinating, and sustaining theater army and/or joint human resources plans and operations systems, policies, and procedures.

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13-10. Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Element  Mission: The Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Element establishes policy, coordinates and manages MWR activities and services for the theater army.  Organization: The MWR Element consists of two Human Resources Officers.  Tasks: The Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) Element establishes MWR policy. It coordinates and manages MWR activities and services for the theater army. It acquires hostnation support (HNS) for MWR activities. It supports Recreation & Recuperation (R&R) sites, locations, and activities. It develops and coordinates with AAFES, Red Cross, and USO/AFE to develop and maintain Wartime Standards of Service. The element manages unit MWR funds plus the R&R, and MWR Trip Programs. It also manages donations, USO procedures, and polices governing operational deployments.

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13-11. Postal Element  Mission: The Postal Element establishes postal policies and manages postal operations for the theater army.  Organization: The Postal Element has one postal officer.  Tasks: The Postal Element coordinates with the Human Resources Sustainment Center, Theater Support Command, and the Military Postal Service Agency for postal operations throughout the AOR. It develops and integrates postal policies and procedures for the AOR. It develops and coordinates contractual postal support operations.

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13-12. G-4 Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The G-4 section develops plans and policies, establishes priorities, integrates logistics, and assesses readiness. The sections inside the G-4 do not manage commodities but rather establish policies, plans, and priorities for execution and synchronization by the TSC. Figure 13-3 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 G-4. Figure 13-3. Theater Army 5.4 G-4

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Organization: The G-4 Section consists of a HQ Element and three Sections: Plans, Exercises, Programs, Policy; Sustainment Operations; and Mobility Operations. The HQ section consists of the G-4, the Senior Logistics NCO, and one Supply NCO. Tasks: The primary function of the G-4 is to assess, coordinate, integrate, direct, and provide all theater army and/or joint sustainment operations and programs. It provides planning, policy and staff oversight of Title 10 and ASOS requirements in support of theater missions. It supports the CCP, when deployed.

13-13. Plans, Exercises, Programs, Policy (PEPP) Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Plans, Exercises, Programs, Policy (PEPP) section prepares the concept of support for estimates, plans, and orders. It analyzes, evaluates and monitors the force flow inputs for OPLANS/CONPLANS for operations and exercises. It provides advice and guidance to commanders and staffs concerning ASOS and ADCON resources.  Organization: The PEPP Section consists of the following elements HQs, plans, exercise, and a program and policies. The HQs Element consists of the Branch Chief and one OPS NCO.

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Theater Army Sustainment Cell

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Tasks: The element compares all sustainment requirements and shortfalls for theater army, multinational, and sister service forces executing operations and exercises. It develops processes to evaluate operational contract support requirements. It plans, prepares, and executes the programming and budgeting for sustainment support for exercises. The section develops the logistics portion of plans and contingencies in support of the headquarters security strategy. He publishes plans, programs and policies regarding ASOS and ADCON support to Army, joint, and multinational forces forward stationed, transiting or operating within the AOR.

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13-14. Plans Element  Mission: The Plans Element prepares the concept of support for estimates, plans, and orders.  Organization: The Plans Element is comprised of the Element Chief, one Acquisition Plans Officer, one Aviation Logistics Plans Officer, and one Logistics Plans Officer.  Tasks: The Plans Element prepares the concept of support for estimates, plans, and orders. It analyzes, evaluates and monitors TPFDD input for estimates, plans, and orders. The element compares all sustainment requirements and shortfalls for theater army, multinational, and sister service forces executing operations and exercises. The element manages the acquisition and the life cycle management processes. These processes include the development and coordination of materiel fielding plans, operational contract support related plans, and specific analysis of acquisition strategies. The element conducts pre-deployment planning, and in coordination with the G-3, ensures the integrated flow of contractors into theater. The element monitors the execution of material fielding and contract support integration plans and provides analysis and recommendations for both. The element provides command policy and planning guidance on aviation maintenance and logistics.

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13-15. Exercise Element  Mission: The Exercise Element is responsible for developing, coordinating, and monitoring logistical support of exercises.  Organization: The exercise Element is comprised of the Element Chief, one Operations Officer and one Senior Operations NCO.  Tasks: The element develops, coordinates, and monitors logistical support of exercises based on contingency plans and operations. The element develops, plans, and coordinates all aspects of logistics for Theater Security Cooperation operations and engagements.

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13-16. Programs and Policy Element  Mission: The Programs and Policy Element provides advice and guidance concerning ASOS and ADCON resources to commanders and staffs and manages internal G4 budget for travel, TDY and Sustainment Cell needs.  Organization: The Programs and Policy Element is comprised of the Element Chief, one Logistics P&P Officer and one Programs Officer.  Tasks: The Programs and Policy Element manages the programming and budgeting for logistical contracts supporting operations and exercises. It coordinates funding supply support from other sources, theater infrastructure programs, and wartime host nation support agreements. It develops and enforces theater sustainment policies as required. The element interprets Army managerial policy for the subsequent development of theater army policies. It consolidates G-4 inputs for submission into the PPBES and Integrated Priority List processes. The element develops command budget submissions, conducts program reviews and maintains program information for G-4 staffing requirements. The element provides advice and guidance concerning ASOS resources to commanders and staffs. The element manages internal G-4 budget for travel, TDY and Sustainment Cell requirements.

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13-17. Sustainment Operations Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Sustainment Operations section coordinates and monitors logistics operations and provides sustainment for all classes of supply in the AO.  Organization: The Sustainment Operations section consists of a Headquarters element and seven other elements: Current Operations, Supply and Services, POL/Water, Materiel Readiness, 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-5

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Multi-National and Interagency, Munitions and Automations elements. The HQs Section is comprised of the Chief and one Senior Logistics Services NCO. Tasks: The section coordinates and monitors logistic operations and provides oversight on all classes of supply in the AOR. Sustainment Operations section reviews and provides input regarding logistics support to all war and contingency plans. It coordinates Mortuary Affairs in the Theater and serves as the Theater Executive Agent for the Joint Mortuary Affairs program. The section is plans and coordinates ASOS and ADCON logistics support to the theater army. The Sustainment Operations section establishes command policy for retrograde operations. It directs the disposal and redistribution of captured enemy supplies and equipment. It also coordinates host nation support requirements in the AOR.

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13-18. Current Operations Element  Mission: The Current Operations Element is responsible for sustainment integration and synchronization in the AOR.  Organization: The Current Operations Element is composed of the Element Chief, one Logistics Officer, one Senior Supply NCO and one Maintenance NCO.  Tasks: The element provides policy guidance and staff supervision for sustainment operations. It integrates and synchronizes the supply chain for the AOR. It monitors current operations and ADCON and ASOS support responsibilities in support of forces. The element monitors the maintenance operations status. The Current Operations Element produces the SITREP and LOGSTAT reports with input from the sustainment cell. The element sets priorities, establishes stock levels, provides staff oversight of critical materials and obtains support from the civilian economy if needed. The element supports the CCP when deployed.

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13-19. Supply and Services Element  Mission: The Supply and Services Element establishes and coordinates distribution of supplies and services in AOR. It provides guidance and supervision for supply and service functions. It assesses the effectiveness of the supply chain.  Organization: The Supply and Services Element consists of six officers, four warrant officers and six NCOs. It is organized as follows: an Element Chief, Class I Operations Officer, CL II, III (P), IV Officer, Mortuary Affairs (MA) Officer and NCO, Aerial Delivery Warrant Officer, Food Service Warrant and NCO, Supply Systems Warrant Officer, Logistics NCO, Field Services NCO, CL VII Officer and NCO, Asset Visibility Officer, Property Book Warrant Officer, and a Readiness NCO.  Tasks: It coordinates and monitors the flow of Classes I, II, IV, VII and IX to Army, joint, interagency and multinational forces in accordance with the theater army commander’s operational plans. It reviews subordinate unit supply and service plans. The element provides policy guidance and staff supervision for supply and service functions and assesses the effectiveness of the supply chain. It establishes property accountability standards in conjunction with the DA G4. The element provides policy, guidance and tracks execution of retrograde operations. It develops supply and services appendices for estimates, plans, and orders supporting operations. The element coordinates theater mortuary affairs and serves as the Executive Agent for the Joint Mortuary Affairs program. The element provides oversight of aerial delivery operations in coordination with counterparts in the TSC/ESC. The element provides planning, policy and coordination for food service operations in the AOR. The element provides technical guidance to SSAs to establish, and maintain adequate supply stockage levels, including floats, for the theater army. The element determines theater laundry and shower requirements and provides field services input to OPLAN annexes. The element establishes, evaluates, and monitors unit training and preventative maintenance programs for field services units. The element monitors the operational readiness of Army prepositioned Stocks (APS); Theater Provided Equipment (TPE) issue, accountability, and turn-in coordination; and Theater Training support systems (TSS) equipment and stocks. The element maintains asset visibility and accountability for CL VII equipment in AOR. The element provides deployment requirements and instructions to units designated to use APS; TPE and TSE assets. The element analyzes data and reports to recognize trends, and problem areas for subordinate units. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-6

Theater Army Sustainment Cell

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13-20. POL and Water Element  Mission: The POL and Water Element provides policy guidance and staff supervision for bulk Class III and water support operations in the AOR.  Organization: The POL and Water Element consists of the Element Chief, one Petroleum Management Officer, one Petroleum Warrant Officer, one POL Operations NCO, and one Water Treatment NCO.  Tasks: The element coordinates, monitors, and provides staff oversight of fuel and water support to Army, joint, interagency and multinational forces in accordance with the theater army commander’s operations plan. The element develops policy guidance and staff supervision for bulk Class III(B) and water support operations in AOR. It develops Class III (B) and water support appendices for OPLANs and reviews subordinate units’ plans. It interfaces and coordinates with the Joint Petroleum Office, DLA, and AMC regarding fuel and water support. The element monitors the water and petroleum usage of units to determine adequate theater stockage levels.

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13-21. Materiel Readiness Element  Mission: The Materiel Readiness Element monitors and analyzes equipment readiness status and coordinate maintenance services and parts within the AOR.  Organization: The Materiel Readiness Element consists of the Element Chief, Readiness Officer, Maintenance Warrant Officer, Aviation Maintenance Warrant Officer, Senior Maintenance NCO and Special Equipment Maintenance NCO  Tasks: The Materiel Readiness Element, in coordination with the Theater Sustainment Command, determines the maintenance workload requirements (less medical) for the AOR. It coordinates recovery, salvage and evacuation operations, to include battle damage assessment. It determines maintenance time lines and provides staff oversight of the Class IX supply chain. The element formulates policy, procedures and directives related to materiel readiness. The element monitors and analyzes the equipment readiness status and coordinates maintenance services and parts within the AOR. The element provides and manages command policy and planning guidance on maintenance and logistics to include aviation. The element provides oversight of the maintenance reporting system, including special equipment, by collecting, analyzing maintenance reports.

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13-22. Multinational and Interagency Element  Mission: The Multinational and Interagency Element coordinates theater army logistics support, less medical, for Multinational forces, US Agencies, NGOs, IGOs and PVOs.  Organization: The Multinational and Interagency Element consists of the element chief, three logistics officers, host nation transportation officer, logistics operations NCO and a transportation management NCO.  Tasks: The element develops estimates, plans, and orders to support theater army logistic support, less medical, to multinational forces, U.S. Agencies, NGOs, IGOs, and PVOs. It develops detailed requirement statements to negotiate support from the host nation. The element manages host nation, Acquisition and Cross Service Agreement and multinational support programs. The element conducts technical training on all programs it manages. It develops procedures to ensure multinational forces, U.S. Agencies, NGOs, IGOs, and PVOs reimburse U.S. forces for logistics support they received.

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13-23. Munitions Element  Mission: The Munitions Element provides staff oversight of ammunition requisition, acquisition and storage within the AOR.  Organization: The Munitions Element is comprised of the Element Chief, one Ammo Retrograde Officer, one Ammo Warrant Officer, one Ammo NCO supervisor, and one Ammo NCO.  Tasks: The Munitions Element coordinates supply of arms, munitions and equipment in the theater. It is responsible for preparing and developing theater munitions policies and procedures,

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-7

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in conjunction with HQDA and the Army Material Command (AMC). The element develops policy concerning disposition of captured enemy ammunition. It develops the ammunition concept of support for theater army operations plans and orders. It ensures sufficient ammunition stocks are available and properly positioned in the theater. The section develops plans and policy for ammunition retrograde operations. The element reviews plan for new or proposed construction to ammunition facilities. The element provides representatives to boards, centers and cells as required. It recommends priorities and controlled supply rates (CSR) for publication in operations plans and orders.

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13-24. Automation Element  Mission: The Automation Element establishes logistics STAMIS policy. It designs, implements, and monitors the logistics STAMIS network for the AOR.  Organization: The Automation Element is comprised of one Logistics Automation Management Officer, one Information Systems Management Officer, one Senior Supply Systems Warrant Officer and one Information Systems Warrant Officer.  Tasks: The Automation Element develops logistics automation policy and prepares logistics automation plans for the theater army. It designs the logistics STATMIS network architecture to ensure connectivity between all echelons, services, agencies, multinational, and host nation organizations. The element coordinates with the G-6 staff for communications requirements. The element maintains a logistics common operating picture (LCOP).

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13-25. Mobility Operations Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Mobility Operations Section serves as the primary technical advisor to the G4 on all matters pertaining to theater transportation policy, support to deploying and redeploying forces and the distribution of material.  Organization: The Mobility Operations Section is comprised of the HQs and four elements. They are the Distribution/Movement Operations, the Air Operations, Sea Operations and Land Operations Elements. The HQs Element consists of the Branch Chief and Senior NCO.  Tasks: The Mobility Operations section provides staff oversight of the distribution, retrograde, and redeployment of equipment, personnel, supplies and services. It arbitrates conflicting unit deployment and redeployment in coordination with the G3. The section provides technical expertise on all theater transportation policy, and systems. It validates the TPFDD and provides expertise on movement planning and execution. It manages JOPES operations for the theater. It provides in-transit visibility for deployment and redeployment operations of personnel, equipment, and material.

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13-26. Distribution and Movement Operations Element  Mission: The Distribution and Movement Operations Element coordinates and monitors intertheater deployment and redeployment operations in the AOR.  Organization: The Distribution and Movement Operations Element consists of the Element Chief, Integration Operations Officer, Transportation Operations Officer, two Mobility Warrant Officers, Transportation Operations Supervisor NCOIC, Staff JOPES/JFRG Movement Analyst NCO, two Movement NCOs and an Information Technology Systems Administration NCO.  Tasks: The Distribution and Movement Operations Element coordinates and matches transportation resources and requirements. The element integrates data from disparate deployment systems. It provides oversight for the distribution, retrograde, and redeployment of equipment, personnel, supplies, services, and equipment for the theater. The element manages the RSO&I and JOPES processes. It monitors STAMIS and other information sources to maintain in-transit visibility of deploying forces and materiel to synchronize theater deployment, RSOI and redeployment operations. The element establishes policy, procedures and oversight of the inland container management program. The element integrates and prioritizes unit and sustainment movements in the AOR. It analyzes and provides recommendations on the impact of force-flow on RSO&I capabilities.

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13-27. Air Operations Element

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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13-8

Theater Army Sustainment Cell

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  

Mission: The Air Operations Element monitors the operation of aerial ports and contingency airfields to determine operational capabilities and limitations across the AOR. Organization: The Air Operations Element is comprised of an Air Movements Officer, one Air Operations officer, one Terminal Ops NCO, one Air OPS NCO, and one Staff Movements NCO. Tasks: The element plans and coordinates air movement operations, including host nation, common-user, special, and combined operations moves. The COMAFFOR is delegated operational control of Air Force assets normally, and if designated the joint force air component commander (JFACC), will typically exercise tactical control of air mobility forces made available to the JFACC. If the JTF requires additional air mobility forces beyond those already made available for tasking, additional augmentation may be requested. The COMAFFOR may appoint a director of mobility forces (DIRMOBFOR) to function as coordinating authority for air mobility with all commands and agencies, both internal and external to the JTF, including the JAOC, the 618th TACC, and the JDDOC and/or the joint movement center (JMC). The DIRMOBFOR will ensure the effective integration of intertheater and intratheater air mobility operations, and facilitate intratheater air mobility operations on behalf of the COMAFFOR. The DIRMOBFOR provides guidance to the air mobility division (AMD) on air mobility matters, but such guidance must be responsive to the timing and tempo of operations managed by the JAOC director. Specific duties of DIRMOBFOR include the following: 1) Coordinate integration of intertheater air mobility capability provided by USTRANSCOM. 2) Facilitate the tasking and effective and efficient employment of air mobility forces attached or assigned to the JFC in conjunction with the AOC commander. 3) Coordinate with the AOC director/commander and AMD chief to integrate air mobility operations supporting the JFC into the air assessment, planning, and execution process, and de-conflicted with other air operations. 4) Coordinate with the 618th TACC and Air Force Transportation Component of USTRANSCOM (AFTRANS) to ensure the joint force air mobility support requirements are met. 5) Assist in the integration and coordination of the multinational air mobility plan. An Air mobility liaison officer (AMLO) is located at division and above and facilitate intratheater airlift request validated and prioritized by the ASCC. Army units assign Ground liaison officers (GLO) to the JAOC/AOC and theater airlift EOCs on occasion to monitor and report on the current airlift situation to their parent unit. They also advise Air Force mission commanders and staffs on Army component air movement requirements, priorities, and other matters affecting the airlift situation. GLOs assigned to the JAOC/AOC report through the Battlefield Coordination Detachment (BCD). They are also the principal points of contact between the Air Force CRGs and Army arrival/departure airfield control groups (A/DACGs) for controlling Army theater airlift movements. The above material was attained from JP 3-17, Air Mobility Operations, 02 October 2009.

13-28. Sea Operations Element  Mission: The Sea Operations Element develops policies, programs and procedures for the movement of personnel, equipment, and material for theater sealift.  Organization: The Sea Operations Element is composed of one Marine Terminal Officer, one Mobility Warrant Officer, one Watercraft Operations Warrant Officer, one Movement Operations NCO, and one Cargo Specialist NCO.  Tasks: The Sea Operations Element develops policies, programs and procedures for the movement of personnel, equipment, and material by sealift and watercraft. It conducts planning and coordination for sealift and intra-theater watercraft operations. The Army component usually provides common user land and inland waterway transportation. It also conducts water terminal operations and, when necessary, logistics over the shore (LOTS) operations. It prioritizes and allocates sealift assets according to theater priorities. The element coordinates and integrates the operational efforts of the Sea Movements Element to support execution of the deployment and redeployment of rotational forces. It maintains in-transit visibility of materiel by sealift. The element monitors port clearance, berthing, staging and departure of forces and material from seaports. It maintains data on the sealift and terminal capabilities and limitations. It plans, coordinates and monitors seaports, Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore (JLOTS), and other lines of communication operations in coordination with SDDC. The element coordinates for port security. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-9

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13-29. Land Operations Element  Mission: The Land Operations Element formulates ground transportation and movement control policy across the AOR.  Organization: The Land Operations Element is composed of one Element Chief, one Operations Officer, one Motor/Rail Officer, one Circulation Control Officer, one Mobility Warrant Officer, two Operations NCOs, one Highway Operations NCO and one Staff Movements NCO.  Tasks: The Land Operations element establishes ground transportation and movement control plans, policies, and programs to manage surface movements. It establishes movement priorities for general, hazardous, joint, interagency, intergovernmental, multinational, and host nation cargo. The element coordinates with outside organizations for the clearance to transport HAZMAT, POL, Class V and other cargo causing transport issues. The element coordinates with the host nation to resolve port clearance, customs and tax issues. It monitors movement of forces and cargo using rail, highway or inland waterway assets. The element maintains the common operating picture of the surface transportation network. It provides alternatives when the surface transportation network experiences disruptions or degraded capabilities.

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13-30. G-8 Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Theater Army G-8 manages all financial matters for the theater army. The Theater Army G-8 recommends the best allocation of resources to accomplish theater army missions. Figure 13-4 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 G-8.

Figure 13-4. Theater Army 5.4 G-8

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Organization: The G-8 is composed of a Headquarters and two sections, the Resource Management and Comptroller sections. The HQs section consists of the G-8, the Senior Financial Management NCO, and one Operations NCO. Tasks: The G-8 section develops, coordinates and synchronizes theater financial management policy, requirements, and support. It manages the Planning Programming Budget Execution (PPBE) process. It identifies resource requirements and determines sources of funding for administrative control (ADCON), Army Support to Other Services (ASOS), and executive agent (EA) activities. The G-8 section develops and implements a management control program and establishes cost management and accounting procedures.

13-31. Resource Management (RM) Section and Headquarters Element 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-10

Theater Army Sustainment Cell

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Mission: The Resource Management section plans and coordinates financial management policy and support for operations. It supervises and manages the Programming and Management Elements. Organization: The Resource Management Section is composed of a Headquarters and two elements, the Management Element and the Programs Element. The HQs consists of the Section Chief and a Senior NCO. Tasks: The element manages all financial management matters for the theater army. It provides input into the Planning, Programming Budget Execution process for the theater army. The element manages internal financial control and inspection programs, and coordinates for audits with external agencies. The element supervises the Plans and Programming and Management elements. The section coordinates force flow for financial management units. It prepares financial management input to estimates, plans, and orders. The section coordinates and synchronizes financial management functions and tasks in support of theater army’s administrative control (ADCON), Army support to other Services (ASOS), and Executive Agent responsibilities.

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13-32. Management Element  Mission: The Management element performs management functions for the command and monitors the orders process for resource implications.  Organization: The Management element consists of the Chief and a Management Analyst Officer.  Tasks: The Management element administers the financial management control program. It validates cost factors associated with requirements. The element conducts contract review and cost analysis and monitors current year program execution. It performs lean six sigma functions. The element coordinates audits with external agencies. It prepares financial management input for estimates, plans, and orders in support of operations.

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13-33. Programs Element  Mission: The Programs Element is responsible for submission of required fiscal documents. The element is the command fiscal expert and advisor on DOD, Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) and HQDA planning and programming documents (e.g. SPG, TAP).  Organization: The Programs Element consists of the Chief and a Comptroller officer.  Tasks: The Programs Element monitors legislative initiatives to assess their impacts and provides input to Congressional Liaison personnel. It produces extended future year plans and budgets in accordance with national and DoD strategies and policies. It provides fiscal policy guidance for estimates, plans, and orders. It prepares the program objective memorandum (POM) and integrated priority list (IPL) input for the theater army. The element reviews and analyzes change proposals, program budget decisions (PBD), program decision memorandum (PDM), joint quarterly readiness review (JQRR) and Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) for fiscal implications.

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13-34. Comptroller Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The section provides accounting policy, advice, assistance, and cost management assessment for the theater army.  Organization: The Comptroller Section consists of a HQ and five additional elements: Host Nation Assistance Element; Budget Operations Element; Financial Management, Accounting, Policy, & Systems Element; Budget Execution and Analysis Element; and the RM Support Element. The HQs Section consists of one Section Chief and one Senior Financial Management NCO.  Tasks: It manages fiscal policy and guidance for budgeting, receipt, distribution, and execution of funding based on command requirements and priorities. The Comptroller Section synchronizes financial management operations between the MCP and the CCP. The section supervises and manages financial management systems oversight. It conducts joint fiscal reviews, cost accounting, past year liquidation and trend analysis in conjunction with the FMC. It provides accounting policy, assistance, and cost management assessment during the 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-11

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development of estimates, plans, and orders. The section also prepares Budget Estimate Submission (BES). The Comptroller provides oversight and supervision for

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13-35. Host Nation Assistance Element  Mission: The Host Nation Assistance element supports theater-wide international arrangements and assesses financial impacts.  Organization: This element consists of a Chief and a Financial Management Officer.  Tasks: The Host Nation Assistance element provides fiscal support, as required, to support host nation agreements and negotiations. The element assist in coordinating the reimbursem*nt or sharing of cost related to support to host nation agreements. The element prepares host nation support reports as required. It coordinates & synchronizes agreements and memorandums for inter-agency and inter-service support requirements.

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13-36. Budget Operations Element  Mission: The element monitors budget execution for current operations to ensure compliance with fiscal law and current policy directives.  Organization: The Budget Operations Element consists of an Element Chief, three Budget Officers and three NCOs.  Tasks: The Budget Operations element conducts economic analysis, forecasting, and contract costing in support of current operations. The element coordinates the execution of ADCON & ASOS financial management functions. It monitors the orders process for resource implications. The element reviews and coordinates contingency cost estimates. It provides fiduciary advice, assistance & technical oversight during current operations. It provides input for the financial management systems. It determines best practices and most efficient fiscal courses of action. The element performs current financial management planning. The element produces financial management input to estimates, plans, and orders for operations.

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13-37. Financial Management, Accounting, Policy (FMAP) and Systems Element  Mission: The Financial Management, Accounting, Policy (FMAP) and Systems Element designs, integrates, and modifies the financial management systems design, integration and modification.  Organization: The FMAP consists of a chief, a Program Management Analyst Officer and two Budget/FM NCOs.  Tasks: The element establishes command finance and accounting advice, assistance and technical oversight. It prepares financial and accounting reports, as required, to track costs. The element manages the operations systems to account for financial obligations and disbursem*nts. The element analyzes system procedures, workflow, policies, to improve accounting operations and budget execution. It manages prior year unexpired appropriations, DoD real estate cost, equipment, supplies, civilian personnel, and other assets.

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13-38. Budget Execution and Analysis Element  Mission: The Budget Execution and Analysis element executes the budget and certifies funds in support of theater army operations.  Organization: The Budget Execution and Analysis Element consist of a Chief, plus the Budget and Financial Management Officers.  Tasks: The Budget Execution and Analysis element coordinates with Army staff, supporting units, host embassies, host nation personnel, and the Combatant Command for budget execution and fund certification. The element provides fund control, monitors fund execution, tracks and reports costs and obligations. It manages purchase request and commitments. It processes TDY claims and manages the Defense Travel System.

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13-39. Resource Management Support Element  Mission: The Resource Management Support element provides support to exercises and theater program managers.  Organization: The element has one Chief and a Budget Analyst Officer. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

13-12

Theater Army Sustainment Cell

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Tasks: The Resource Management Support element monitors the exercise budget’s execution for legal compliance. It identifies and manages funds available for immediate expenses. It provides cost and economic analysis, forecasting, current year analysis, life support and other sustainment costing.

13-40. Engineer Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Engineer section integrates engineer programs, policy and plans within the theater army AO. Figure 13-5 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Engineer Element.

Figure 13-5. Theater Army 5.4 Engineer Element

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Organization: The engineer section of the Sustainment Cell consists of a Headquarters and two sections, the Facilities and Construction (F&C) and the Plans and Operations (P&O) Sections. The HQs consists of the Section Chief and an Engineer SGM. Tasks: The engineer section coordinates and synchronizes engineer operations across the AO. Examples of the operations include construction, mine removal, and mobility and counter mobility operations. The section plans real estate and environmental actions. It establishes the engineer policy within the AO.

13-41. Facilities & Construction Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Facilities & Construction section reviews policies and procedures for construction, real estate actions, environmental programs, and deconstruction and retrograde of materiel and equipment from theater.  Organization: The Facilities and Construction Section consists of a Headquarters and three elements: Facilities and Construction Element, Real Estate Element and an Environmental Element. The Headquarters consists of the Section Chief and Senior Operations NCO.  Tasks: The Facilities & Construction section reviews policies and procedures for construction, real estate actions, environmental programs, and deconstruction and retrograde of materiel and equipment from theater. It coordinates and synchronizes engineer actions in the construction of Joint or single Service use facilities and general construction. It manages real estate actions and environmental programs within the AO. The section conducts assessments and plans for natural hazard mitigation for impacts to civilians and military operations. It verifies critical infrastructure, and the presence of industrial hazards and their mitigation. It verifies the 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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availability of construction materials and provides construction method and material recommendations. It recommends priorities of construction and allocation of resources to the various competing organizations throughout the AO.

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13-42. Facilities & Construction Element  Mission: The Facilities and Construction element recommends policies and procedures for construction, real estate actions, environmental programs. It makes policy recommendations on the deconstruction and retrograde of materiel and equipment from theater.  Organization: The Facilities and Construction element is composed of an Element Chief, two Facilities/Contract Construction Management Engineer (FCCME) officers and one Senior Technical Engineer NCO.  Tasks: The Facilities and Construction element assists in policy implementation and quality checks. It conducts analysis of building methods, assists with project designs, and assesses designs based on natural hazard mitigation on military projects. It assists in verifying critical infrastructure and potential hazards. The element seeks sources of building materials and evaluates building material suitability for construction. It recommends construction methods and priorities for the AO. It allocates resources to competing organizations in the AO.

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13-43. Real Estate Element  Mission: The Real Estate element conducts comprehensive analysis of existing and additional real estate requirements.  Organization: The Real Estate element is composed of two Real Property Officers and one Engineer Real Estate Officer.  Tasks: It coordinates and synchronizes real estate requirements and operations, including maintenance, for the AO.

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13-44. Environmental Element  Mission: The Environment Element conducts comprehensive analysis of existing environmental requirements in the AO.  Organization: The Environmental Element is composed of an Environmental Chief and an Environmental NCO.  Tasks: The Environmental Element coordinates the implementation of best practices for the entire AO. It provides technical support to other sections as required. The element advises the commander on all aspects of the environmental mission to include interface with the medical and supply sections.

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13-45. Plans and Operations Section  Mission: The Plans and Operations section coordinates and synchronizes engineer operations in the AO.  Organization: The Plans and Operations section consists of a Section Chief, a plans officer, three operations officers, an assistant operations officer, a utility maintenance warrant officer, and an operations NCO.  Tasks: The section coordinates and synchronizes near term operations to include tracking engineer specific operations. The section determines requirements in conjunction with the supported organizations and seeks resources to meet requirements.

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13-46. Surgeon Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Surgeon Section plans, coordinates, monitors, and synchronizes the execution of the Army Health System (AHS) activities for the theater army. Figure 13-6 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Surgeon Section.

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Theater Army Sustainment Cell

Figure 13-6. Theater Army 5.4 Surgeon Section

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Organization: The Command Surgeon Section is composed of a headquarters, Medical Operations Element, and a Support Operations Element. The Command Surgeon functions as a personal staff officer to the theater army commander. The headquarters consists of the Surgeon, the Deputy Surgeon, the Senior Medical NCO and a Health Care SGT/Driver. Tasks: The Surgeon section provides medical planning, supervision and administrative assistance for the theater army and its subordinate units. It provides recommendations for the conduct of medical activities in support of operations. The section manages Army Health System support in the execution of Title 10, Army Support to Other Services, and Executive Agent responsibilities. It provides technical advice and consultation for veterinary services in support of the Army’s food inspection, animal medical care, and veterinary preventive medicine programs. It provides technical advice and consultation on medical automated information systems and programs. The section develops and coordinates medical evacuation and medical regulating plans, policies, and procedures with the GCC Surgeon and the Theater Patient Movements Requirements Center.

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13-47. Medical Operations Element  Mission: The Medical Operations element manages medical current, evacuation, and patient administration operations for the AO.  Organization: The Medical Operations element consists of the Chief, an Aeromedical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Officer, a Patient Administration Officer, a Medical Current Operations Officer, and a Medical Operations NCO.  Tasks: The Medical Operations element manages the flow of patients and casualties to medical facilities within the AO. It manages patient and casualty evacuation from theater. It develops and monitors mass casualty plans, and determines the medical workload requirements based upon the casualty estimate. The element recommends medical evacuation policies and procedures. The element allocates medical resources to provide effective and consistent treatment or evacuation of wounded, injured, or sick personnel. It develops, synchronizes and coordinates Army Health System (AHS) support in order to support the commander’s decisions, planning guidance, and intent. The Medical Operations element manages medical input to estimates, plans, and orders. It maintains the common operating picture for all medical assets operating in the area of operations. The element determines the health threat and provides advice concerning the medical effects of the environment and of CBRN weapons on personnel.

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13-48. Support Operations Element  Mission: The Support Operations element manages health service and medical resources to provide effective and consistent treatment and evacuation of wounded, injured, or sick personnel.  Organization: The Support Operations element consists of the Chief, Medical Service Officer, Clinical Services Officer, Environmental Science Officer, Veterinary Services Officer, Health Services Personnel Manager Officer, Medical Logistics Officer, and Health Services Systems Management Officer.  Tasks: The Support Operations element develops policy for health service, veterinary service, environmental science, and medical logistics. The element determines requirements and 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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priorities for medical logistics. It adapts medical equipment sets for a specific scenarios. It monitors and manages the requisition, procurement, storage, maintenance, distribution, management, and documentation of Class VIII materiel, blood, blood products, and special items of subsistence. The element monitors the final disposition of all blood products in coordination with the Area Joint Blood Program Office (AJBPO), Joint Blood Program Office, and Armed Services Blood Program Office (ASBPO). The element ensures an effective and consistent operation for medical and dental services. It ensures preventive medicine and veterinary services are available for all Services within the theater.

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Theater Army Mission Command Cell

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14-1. The Mission Command Warfighting Cell is the primary integrator of information tasks associated with information operations. Figure 14-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Mission Command Cell. The theater army commander uses information tasks to shape the operational environment throughout the operations process. The Mission Command Cell integrates cyber, electromagnetic, inform and influence activities for information operations. The CoS directs the activities of the Mission Command Warfighting Cell. The Mission Command Cell consists of the G-7 Information Engagement, G-9 Civil Affairs, and G-6 Signal Sections.

Figure 14-1. Theater Army 5.4 Mission Command Cell

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14-2. G-7/Information Engagement (IE) Section  Mission: The G-7/Information Engagement (IE) section coordinates, synchronizes, and communicates theater army words and images to inform and influence the diverse population and actors relevant to the success of the theater army missions.  Organization: The G-7/Information Engagement Section consists of eight personnel organized into three elements: Headquarters, Information Engagement, and PSYOP.  Tasks: The section plans, coordinates and synchronizes influence operations with theater army plans. It coordinates with the Theater Special Operations Command (TSOC) for Military Information Support Team (MIST) assistance. It coordinates PSYOP actions with other services, agencies, allies, multinational partners to ensure cooperation and mutual support of PSYOP programs. The section along with external organizations and agencies assess the effects of psychological operations. It directs and integrates PSYOP plans, programs, and policies with information operations (IO) and PSYOP functions within the AO. The section, in coordination with the Plans section, develops the Overt Peacetime Influence or MISO program for the theater as specified in DoDD 3321.1 (note terminology change from emerging doctrine in FM 3-0).

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14-3. G-9/Civil Affairs Section  Mission: The G-9/Civil Affairs Section engages and influences the civil populace by planning, executing, and assessing Civil Affairs and Civil Military operations in support of the theater army.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, chief of operations, SGM and an operations NCO.  Tasks: The section coordinates, synchronizes, and integrates civil-military plans, programs, and policies with external organizations. The section provides advice and analysis to the staff on Civil Affairs Operations (CAO) and Civil Military operations (CMO). It conducts cultural 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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relations training as required. The section develops CAO and CMO estimates, plans, and orders in support of theater army operations. The section provides politico-military support to other government agencies, host nations, Intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

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14-4. G-6 Signal Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The G-6/Signal Section coordinates and integrates theater army communications and information network capabilities and the extension of those capabilities to austere environments across the Area of Responsibility (AOR). Figure 14-2 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 G-6.

Figure 14-2. Theater Army 5.4 G-6

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Organization: The section consists of sixty-one personnel organized into one element and four sections. The G-6, for most theater armies, is the commander of the signal organization assigned to the theater army. The G-6/commander is on the signal organization’s TO&E. Tasks: The section delivers a net-centric information enterprise that enables decision superiority while supporting the Army’s information and technology management strategic objectives in the AO. It coordinates, manages, and apportions all spectrum requirements for land forces. The section stores, manages, and distributes communications security (COMSEC) material and plans the theater army’s communications network. It plans and provides management and control over input to theater army basing initiatives, information management system architecture, and longrange modernization plans. It coordinates the integration of commercial off-the-shelf communications capabilities into theater army operations. The section manages computer intrusion awareness, prevention, training standards, and assistance to secure the network infrastructure. The section plans, manages, administers, and maintains C2 information systems (INFOSYS) connectivity with external organizations. It integrates computer and communications interoperability to support Title 10 policy and technical requirements.

14-5. G-6 Operations Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Operations Section manages and integrates information system (INFOSYS) networks to support theater army’s communication requirements.

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Organization: The section consists of the headquarters and three subordinate Elements: Theater Communications Security (COMSEC) Management, Theater Spectrum Management, and Plans and Exercises. Tasks: The section coordinates with host nation communications authorities. It manages the theater army’s communications and INFOSYS environment, and integrates INFOSYS support to joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational organizations. The section manages theater army INFOSYS asset availability, assesses the INFOSYS network’s ability to meet battle command and information exchange requirements, and prepares input to theater army plans and orders.

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14-6. Theater Communications Security (COMSEC) Management Element  Mission: The Theater Communications Security (COMSEC) Management Element develops policy, guidance, and manages the theater army COMSEC program.  Organization: The element consists of a senior warrant officer and four senior COMSEC NCOs.  Tasks: The element establishes and enforces COMSEC policy and guidance for the theater army. It provides training on COMSEC keying materiel, management, and accountability procedures. It provides limited COMSEC distribution to the MCP and subordinate headquarters in the AO. It provides limited receipt-and-storage courier service for COMSEC key materials for distribution. It provides COMSEC support for the RSOI of Army, joint, interagency, and multinational forces.

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14-7. Theater Spectrum Management Element  Mission: The element plans and manages the use of the electromagnetic spectrum within the theater army.  Organization: The element consists of a sergeant major and three senior NCOs.  Tasks: The element establishes the theater Joint Frequency Management Office (JFMO) and assists with spectrum management matters affecting the integration of Army and joint functional systems into the theater army’s network architecture. It coordinates, manages, and apportions all frequency requirements for land forces and submits satellite access requests to the supported GCC J-6 satellite manager. The element receives and processes joint spectrum interference reports from U.S. military forces. It coordinates with host-nation authorities to de-conflict military use of the electromagnetic spectrum. It coordinates spectrum management support for the RSOI of Army, joint, interagency, and multinational forces.

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14-8. Plans and Exercise Element  Mission: The Plans and Exercise Element develops information system requirements in support of joint operations, plans, and exercises.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, three plans officers, a Network Management Warrant Officer, and three senior NCOs.  Tasks: The element coordinates and synchronizes signal operations. It supports reception, staging, onward movement, and integration (RSO&I) for multinational and joint land forces. It validates tactical and strategic-level data, voice, and VTC communications operational needs statements for the theater army. It prioritizes installation and restoration of communications systems and circuits. It evaluates operational impacts of authorized service interruptions and network outages and enforces policies regulating the use of non-tactical radio systems. The element provides and maintains Signal CCIR and operational awareness of the JOA signal environment. It coordinates combat camera activities in coordination with the G-3. It manages JOA network directories (VTC, telephone, SIPR, NIPR). It also conducts planning for and configuration, implementation, and analysis of information systems requirements. They develop signal requirements for exercises. It monitors and synchronizes the signal portion of the TPFDL.

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14-9. Programs, Policy, and Projects Section and Headquarters Element  Mission: The Programs, Policy, and Projects Section and Headquarters Element plans and manages theater army communications and information networks. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Organization: The section consists of the headquarters and four elements: Projects, Information Assurance (IA), Programs and Policy, and Enterprise Architecture. Tasks: The section plans and provides management and control over input to theater army, information management systems architecture and long-range modernization plans. It acquires and communicates information and maintains command and control (C2) system status. The section manages network enterprise initiatives, and ensures theater army architectures meet DOD, joint, DA, and other pertinent operational and doctrinal standards. It enforces theaterlevel information technology (IT) governance.

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14-10. Projects Element  Mission: The Projects Element manages network enterprise initiatives and projects for the theater army.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, a telecommunications engineering officer, a Network Management Warrant Officer, and a senior Network Plans NCO.  Tasks: The element manages network enterprise initiatives and projects for the theater army and manages intra-theater information systems projects and initiatives IAW the Clinger-Cohen Act. It coordinates the integration of commercial-off-the-shelf communications and information systems for the theater army. It synchronizes and coordinates project requests for service, satellite, and gateway access and submits requests for funding through the G-8 and GCC J-8. The element plans and monitors the communications commercialization program through all phases of operations. It coordinates with national and strategic information system-engineering activities to implement initiatives in support of theater army operations and plans.

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14-11. Information Assurance (IA) Element  Mission: The Information Assurance (IA) Element establishes, manages, and assesses the theater army IA program.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, an Information Systems Warrant Officer, and two Information Assurance NCOs.  Tasks: The IA Element serves as the Theater IA program manager. The element provides computer intrusion awareness and prevention, training, and assistance. It oversees, assesses, and supports IA certification and accreditation for theater army units. It manages and directs theater army IA policy and funding to include COMSEC, firewalls, and intrusion detection systems and recommends the IO condition. The element coordinates IA activities with the staff and the theater network operations and security center (TNOSC), and the regional computer emergency response team (RCERT).

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14-12. Programs and Policy Element  Mission: The Programs and Policy Element manages the theater army information management systems program and supports the development of long-range modernization plans and basing plans.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, a senior Signal Warrant Officer, and a senior NCO.  Tasks: The element plans and provides management and control over communications systems basing initiatives, information management systems program, and long-range modernization plans. In coordination with the DCS G-8, the element manages the communications and computer Management Decision Evaluation Packages (MDEP) for the theater army. It develops policy for network enterprise initiatives. The element ensures theater army information systems architectures meet DOD, joint, HQDA, and other pertinent operational and doctrinal standards. The element manages the Theater Configuration Management Board.

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14-13. Enterprise Architecture Element  Mission: The Enterprise Architecture Element ensures compliance and interoperability with the Army and joint information environment for technology.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, a Telecommunication Systems Engineer Officer, and an Information Systems Warrant Officer. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Tasks: The element plans and provides management and control over information management systems architecture. It provides communications input to theater army basing initiatives, and long-range modernization plans for the theater army. It develops the theater army operational, systems, and technical architectures and standards to ensure equipment, systems, and networks meet DOD, joint, DA, and other pertinent requirements. It provides services in compliance with the Clinger-Cohen Act, to include management of the theater army portion of the Army knowledge management program. It provides oversight of network technology insertions, expansions, and upgrades. The section provides program, policy, technical and management expertise to execute assigned network and information architecture tasks. The section ensures compliance and interoperability of the enterprise architecture with joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational architectures.

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14-14. Headquarters Support Section  Mission: The Headquarters Support Section installs, operates, maintains networks and video teleconferencing (VTC) services, and supports user-operated information systems.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, a Network Operations Officer, nine NCOs, and four enlisted Soldiers.  Tasks: The section installs, operates, and maintains network and video teleconferencing services. It administers the headquarters’ VTC schedule. The section protects information systems from enemy attack and natural occurrences. It installs, operates, maintains, and manages the configuration of networks in support of user-operated terminals. The section manages the headquarters information systems automation life cycle replacement plan. It provides telephone and data directory support, manages wireless services (Cellular phones, PDAs), satellite-based phones, and commercial off-the-shelf radios. The section includes the COMSEC custodian for the theater army HQ.

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14-15.

Joint/Coalition Network Section  Mission: The Joint/Coalition Network Section plans, manages, administers, and maintains joint and multinational C2 information systems integration with Army Battle Command Systems (ABCS) and sustainment systems.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, three officers, an Information Systems Warrant Officer, three NCOs, and two enlisted Soldiers.  Tasks: The section performs configuration management for Army, joint, and multinational functional systems. The section leads and participates in Army, joint and multinational information management boards. The section develops and maintains operational, systems, and technical architectures of the theater army’s battle command and related information systems. It oversees the integration of Army, joint, and multinational battle command systems and manages hardware and software upgrades as necessary. It develops and maintains the concept of operations for multinational network systems, and information exchange for joint and multinational exercises. It reviews Army, joint, and multinational doctrine for emerging concepts in information management and information systems. It plans, manages, administers, and maintains training, training support, and certification programs for C2 information systems. The section maintains GCCS (both Army and Joint) servers providing a COP for the theater army AO. The section analyzes new technical requirements submitted by subordinate commands for integration into joint and coalition networks.

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Chapter 15

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15-1. The Contingency Command Post (CCP) provides the theater army with a capability to directly command and control smaller types of limited intervention or peace operations. The environments for these operations vary from a permissive, uncertain, and hostile one to a peaceful one. The decision to employ the CCP for a given mission involves a trade-off between the CCP’s immediately responsive capability, and its known limitations with regard to the scale, scope, complexity, intensity, and duration of operations that it can effectively command and control without significant augmentation. The CCP consists of a Command Group, Personal Staff Section, Intel, Movement and Maneuver (M2), Fires, Protection, Sustainment and Mission Command Cells. Figure 15-1depicts the Theater Army 5.4 CCP. The Headquarters Support Company (HSC) of the Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHB) provides support to the CCP when deployed.

Figure 15-1. Theater Army 5.4 Contingency Command Post Organization 15-2. Command Group 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Mission: The CCP Command Group (normally the DCG) extends the control of the commander in the CCP’s AO. Organization: The command group consists of the DCG, Deputy Chief of Staff (DCoS), Aide de Camp, and an information systems technician/driver. The MCP provides the DCG, Aide de Camp and driver positions (code 50). Tasks: The Command Group visualizes the nature and design of operations to support the GCC’s concept of operations. It describes the time, space, available resources, purpose and action of forces assigned to the headquarters for operations in the AO. The Command Group directs Army support to the joint, interagency, and multinational forces in the CCP’s AO. The DCoS tracks the manning, training, and readiness of the CCP when not deployed. The DCoS acts as the CoS for the DCG when the CCP deploys. The DCG provides command and control for the forces assigned to the CCP in the AO when the CCP deploys.

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15-3. Special Staff. The Special Staff consists of personnel from the MCP’s Knowledge Management and PAO sections. Special Staff manning levels are dependent upon mission requirements.

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15-4. CCP Knowledge Management (KM) Section  Mission: The Knowledge Management (KM) Section supports the commander and staff in achieving situational understanding and making informed, knowledgeable, and timely decisions through the integration and management of Army Battle Command Systems.  Organization: The KM Section consists of one officer.  Tasks: The KM section advises the staff on KM processes and enabling technologies. The section creates collects, organizes, stores, applies and transfers knowledge by using innovative technology to facilitate situational understanding and decision-making. The section assists the commander and staff in integrating battle command systems into the headquarters processes consistent with KM best practices. The section coordinates with the G-6 for technical network requirements and analysis of new KM information technology for increased KM capabilities. It assists the staff in managing the common operational picture and briefings.

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15-5. CCP Public Affairs Office (PAO) Section  Mission: The Theater Army Public Affairs Office (PAO) section advises the commander and expedites the flow of accurate and timely information about the activities of U.S. Army and U.S. joint forces to external population and internal audiences.  Organization: The CCP PAO Section consists of a chief, one Battle Command Systems Officer, one PA Broadcast NCO and two equipment operator/maintainers. The MCP's Deputy PAO provides augmentation if needed.  Tasks: The PAO section advises the commander and staff on all aspects of public affairs planning, information strategies, media facilitation, and training. The section provides advice on community relations issues and operations. The section provides advice on the use of command information print and broadcast (radio/TV) capabilities. The PAO coordinates public affairs planning and operations, media facilitation and NGO requests with subordinate, adjacent and higher headquarters as required. The section responds to media queries, plans and coordinates media visits and media embed requests.

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15-6. Intelligence Cell: The Theater Army Intelligence Cell is responsible for the synchronization and integration of Intelligence operations throughout the CCP’s AO. The Cell's sections and elements either embed or coordinate with the staff to facilitate this synchronization. The cell is dependent upon the MCP and Theater Military Intelligence Brigade for planning and products for intelligence collection, single source analysis, and all source fusion to meet CCP intelligence needs. The CCP Intelligence Cell consists of an Intelligence HQs, ISR Operations, G2X, ISR Target Development, and Staff Weather Office (USAF) section. The cell facilitates effective execution of small-scale contingency operations ranging from Noncombatant Evacuation (NEO), Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response (HA/DR) in both permissive and non-permissive environments. The MCP produces the OPORDs, normally, and the CCP focuses on controlling the execution of the plan. This arrangement applies to short-term assessment of operations as well. The CCP's Intelligence Cell consists of a HQs, ISR Operations, G2X, ISR Target Development, and Staff Weather Office (USAF) section. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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15-7. Intelligence Cell and Headquarters Element  Mission. The Intelligence Cell conducts management, staff supervision, force integration, evaluation, and oversight for all intelligence activities in support of the CCP.  Organization: The cell consists of a HQs, ISR Operations, G2X, ISR Target Development, and Staff Weather Office (USAF) section. The Headquarters consists of a chief, intelligence NCO/special security representative.  Tasks: The cell supervises the processing, reporting, and dissemination of theater and national level intelligence to satisfy intelligence requirements. It collaborates with the Military Intelligence Brigade (MIB) Analysis and Control Element for prioritization of analytic requirements and when applicable the Theater Operations Company (THOC) and, Regional Operation Company (ROC). It accesses information from national assets. The Cell is responsible for the management, validation, approval, and dissemination of the threat COP to higher, lower, and adjacent commands and agencies, as well as preparation of intelligence products for distribution. It manages the allocation of intelligence assets, and collects, evaluates, fuses, produces, disseminates all-source intelligence for the CCP. It advises the Commander on the enemy, weather and terrain.

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15-8. Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations Section  Mission. The Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations Section, CCP provides current Intelligence support to contingency operations of limited scale, scope, intensity and duration.  Organization: The section consists of two Intelligence Officers, an All-Source Intelligence Technician, Imagery Technician (Code 50), SIGINT Analyst Technician, Senior Intelligence Sergeant, an Intelligence Sergeant , and a Senior LAN Manager.  Tasks: The section receives collection reports from G2X (CCP), Intelligence Support Element (MIB), interagency, multinational, and agencies. It presents intelligence products derived from multiple sources to joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational organizations, when necessary. .It integrates and synchronizes intelligence collection operations. It develops and recommends changes to CCIR, PIR, and IR. The section establishes and maintains TS/SCI networks (JWICS / NSANet) and operates the JWICS VTC capability for the CCP. leads nearterm predictive analysis for support to current operations. It processes Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) requests to generate actionable intelligence. It interprets imagery products for inclusion in the COP, and assesses the quality of IMINT reporting. It coordinates SIGINT collection and analysis requirements with the MIB and other SIGINT elements operating in support of the theater army. It installs, operates, and performs unit maintenance on multi functional / multi user information processing systems, peripheral equipment, and auxiliary devices. It performs data control and bulk data storage operations, and transfers data between information processing equipment and systems.

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15-9. G2X Section  Mission: The G2X Section conducts oversight of intelligence operations, and provides operation Intelligence to support contingency operations of limited scale, scope, intensity and duration.  Organization: The section, CCP consists of one HUMINT Officer, one CI Senior SGT, and a HUMINT Collector.  Tasks: The section receives processes, disseminates, and presents intelligence derived through Counter Intelligence (CI) and Human Intelligence (HUMINT) operations. It synchronizes, and coordinates source operations with National agencies, Host Nations, Law enforcement agencies, and Sister Services. The section synchronizes, and coordinates cyber CI targeting, collection, and investigations. It synchronizes and coordinates with antiterrorism and force protection elements. The section ensures all CI and HUMINT sources register with the MCP's operational support element. It provides HUMINT and CI case control and source operations management and oversight. The section synchronizes, and coordinates technical services in support of CI and HUMINT operations. The section establishes HUMINT and CI quality controls and releases reports as necessary. It develops policy and procedures for subordinate unit HUMINT/CI

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activities. He oversees and manages the use of intelligence contingency funds by fielded teams and subordinate units to ensure regulatory compliance. The section post reports to the database, and disseminates them in accordance with regulations and policies. The section maintains status of all AO CI and collection elements.

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15-10. ISR Target Development Section  Mission: The Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Target Development Section integrates and synchronizes intelligence into the targeting cycle for lethal and non-lethal fires, and nominates priority targets.  Organization: The section consists of two Intelligence Officer .  Tasks: The section represents the G2 during the Joint Collection Management Board and other targeting working groups and boards. It presents and briefs intelligence in support of targeting. It recommends changes to the ISR synchronization matrix based on current operations, and provides direction and guidance to intelligence collection operations in support of targeting. It nominates priority targets, integrates and synchronizes intelligence into the targeting cycle for lethal and non-lethal fires.

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15-11. Staff Weather Office (SWO) (USAF)  Mission: The Staff Weather Office (SWO) Element provides full-range weather support to the CCP.  Organization: The element consists of two Air Force Weather Officers (O4s).  Tasks: The element provides weather support for CCP operations and planning. It tailors weather support products to support OPLAN / CONPLAN development and maintenance. It provides standard weather observations, forecasts, and warning support to deployed Army headquarters forces, and specialized operations mission.

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15-12. Movement and Maneuver (M2) Cell. The CCP Movement and Maneuver (M2) Cell facilitates effective execution of small-scale contingency operations ranging from Non-combatant Evacuation (NEO), to Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response (HA/DR) in both permissive and non-permissive environments. The cell is dependent on the MCP for operational planning. The MCP produces the OPORDs, normally, and the CCP focuses on controlling the execution of the plan and assessing the operations. The cell directs the operations process and other subordinate processes. The cell is organized with a current and future operations cell, and AC2, Engineer, SJA, Space, Regional Affairs, and Aviation sections

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15-13. Current Operations and Integration Cell (COIC)  Mission: The Current Operations and Integration Cell (COIC) conducts limited short term planning for small-scale contingencies of limited duration. It issues orders and monitors, assesses, collects and processes relevant operational information to produce and disseminate a Common Operational Picture (COP).  Organization: The cell consists of a chief, two deputies, two operations officers, operations SGM, and three operations NCOs.  Tasks: The COIC oversees CCP operations and all its functions. The COIC synchronizes all current operations IOT provide the command with a common operational picture (COP) and facilitate command and control of theater army assets within the AO. It maintains current operations staff estimates through the B2C2WGs process. It synchronizes all aspects of operational maneuver between the Warfighting Functions and monitors sister service and multinational partner operations. The COIC manages the Battle Rhythm through Battle Update Briefs (BUB) and Command Update Briefs (CUB) to ensure the command stays synchronized. The cell integrates LNO functions and reports into COIC operations. The cell manages and disseminates the COP to all commands. The cell monitors and evaluates the tactical situation and CCIRs throughout the AO and recommends adjustments as needed.

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15-14. Future Operations (FUOPS) Cell

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Mission: The Future Operations (FUOPS) Cell refines and modifies OPLANS and OPORDs based on the current situation, and develops branches and assesses midrange progress of operations. Organization: The cell consists of a chief and one operations/plans officer. Tasks: The FUOPS Cell develops and produces plan and order refinements based upon the assessment of the current situation and midrange progress. It refines OPORDs within the current phase and conducts crisis action planning. The cell provided responsive planning for near and midterm contingency situations. It hosts theater deployment and redeployment planning conference for land forces in the AO. The cell is the top-level synchronization point for near and mid-term theater army operations within the AO.

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15-15. Airspace Command and Control (AC2) Section  Mission: The Airspace Command and Control (AC2) Section is responsible for airspace coordination, integration and regulation for organic, assigned, or attached forces.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, an Airspace Management Warrant Officer and a Senior Airspace Control NCO.  Tasks: The section integrates theater army airspace for the CCP and its organic, assigned, or attached forces. The section coordinates with the Fires and Protection Cells for the integration of army and joint fires. The section coordinates with the Aviation section for Air Traffic Services planning, and with the AMD section for the theater tactical air picture. It coordinates with both Aviation and AMD sections to develop procedures for airspace combat ID and counter fratricide. The section develops and submits Army requirements for the joint Airspace Control Plan (ACP) and for the joint airspace control order (ACO). The section integrates airspace use with the commander's priorities to produce and maintain AC2 policies, and annexes for plans, and orders. The section routinely coordinates with the JTF ACA, other functional components, the Battlefield Coordination Detachment, subordinate units and host nation civil airspace authorities

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15-16. Aviation Section  Mission: The Aviation Section coordinates and synchronizes the execution of operational and tactical aviation maneuver and sustainment operations in the CCP’s AO.  Organization: The Aviation Section consists of a chief, an operations warrant officer and two operations NCOs.  Tasks: The section synchronizes and integrates aviation operations to maximize combat effectiveness. The section monitors and advises the OMMD director on aviation asset status. It monitors and assists with aviation force projection, and the reception, staging, onward movement and integration (RSO&I) process. The section coordinates theater specific training, for Army, joint, and multinational aviation forces. The section coordinates and synchronizes the execution of aerial reconnaissance, attack, vertical envelopment, air assault, aerial maneuver sustainment, and the transportation of ARFOR key personnel. The section provides aviation input to the joint air tasking order. It coordinates and synchronizes Army and joint aviation fires and fire support for operations. The section ensures aviation maintenance and logistic assets are coordinated and available for operations.

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15-17. Engineer Section  Mission: The Engineer Section coordinates, and synchronizes engineer operations in the CCP’s AO.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, a Utilities Warrant Officer and two senior engineer NCOs.  Tasks: The section synchronizes engineer operations and reviews construction plans and programs. It provides a degree of QA/QC, issues construction guidance to staff sections. It coordinates, designs, and resources Host Nation construction support. The section develops, coordinates, and synchronizes utilities requirements. They supervise construction site development relating to surveying, drafting, and verifying specifications. They supervise

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construction projects, and provide estimates on projects concerning material, time and amount of labor.

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15-18. Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) Section  Mission: The Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) Section integrates international and operational law into the CCP’s current operations.  Organization: The section consists of two operational law (OPLAW) attorneys, and is augmented by two code 50 SJA positions from the MCP Special staff.  Tasks: The section provides legal, regulatory, and policy expertise to the theater army commander and staff during the conduct of current operations. It provides expertise on operational and international law, rules of engagement, and the legal aspects of current operations. It coordinates with the MCP OSJA and supporting Contracting Support Brigade (CSB) Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) section for legal services, administrative and civil law, contract and fiscal law, legal assistance and claims.

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15-19. Regional Affairs Section  Mission: The Regional Affairs Section plans politico-military support to the CCP staff and subordinate units on all political events affecting the theater army’s operations.  Organization: The section consists of three Desk Officers. If tasked, the MCP Regional Affairs Section augments the CCP with personnel.  Tasks: The section provides regional cultural advice to the theater army commander and staff in support of operations. It advises the CCP staff and subordinate theater army units on cultural aspects of operations in the AO. It coordinates politico-military support to authorized governments and groups by serving as the key link between the CCP headquarters and appropriate U.S. embassies, defense attaché offices, and other U.S. agencies.

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15-20. Space Section  Mission: The Space Section advises the CCP and MCP staffs on the capabilities, limitations, availability, and use of military and commercial space assets to support operations.  Organization: The Space Section consists of one Space Operations Officer. If augmented, the section receives support from one or more of the following: Army Space Support team, Commercial Imagery Team (CIT), Army Space Coordination Element (ASCE), Space Situational Awareness Planning Team (SSAPT), or Tactical Space Situational Awareness Planning Team (TSSAPT).  Tasks: The section provides space-based multi-spectral imagery products and hyper-spectral imagery products obtained from the Spectral Operations Resource Center. The space section, when augmented, provides space based GEOINT products obtained through the collection management process.

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15-21. Fires Cell. The Fires Cell coordinates, integrates and synchronizes the employment and assessment of lethal/non-lethal fires and Command and Control Warfare in the CCP’s AO. The MCP produces OPORDs, normally, and the CCP focuses on controlling the execution of the plan, and assessing the operations.  Mission: The Fires Cell coordinates, integrates and synchronizes the employment and assessment of lethal/non-lethal fires and Command and Control Warfare in support of small limited intervention and peace operations.  Organization: The Fires Cell consists of two officers, two warrant officers and four operations NCOs.  Tasks: The cell employs, processes and attacks targets/target sets with lethal/non-lethal fires and Command and Control Warfare. It collects target information and provides target intelligence for the Joint Operations Area. The cell establishes targeting guidance, and develops high payoff and high value targets for attack. The cell coordinates, integrates and assigns joint, interagency and multinational firepower to targets/target systems. It synchronizes Army, joint, interagency, and multinational component air assets, attack helicopters, maritime gun and missiles, Army rockets and missiles, and Command and Control Warfare (physical attack, electronic warfare, 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Theater Army Contingency Command Post Organization

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and computer network operations). It develops planning guidance and coordinates precision engagement counter countermeasures. The cell provides an automated fire support capability and maintains digital system connectivity, maintain operations and force status information. The cell conducts Command and Control Warfare planning, electronic deception operations and develops targeting products for working groups, boards, plans and orders. In conjunction with the Intelligence and Signal sections, the cell integrates and synchronizes the effects of friendly and enemy electronic warfare.

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15-22. Protection Cell. The CCP Protection Cell coordinates, integrates, synchronizes and assesses protection operations in support of small limited intervention and peace operations. The MCP produces OPORDs, normally, and the CCP focuses on controlling the execution of the plan, and assessing operations. The CCP Protection Cell is organized into AT/FP, PMO, AMD, CBRNE and PR Sections.

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15-23. Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection (AT/FP) Section  Mission: The Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection (AT/FP) Section establishes AT/FP plans, programs, and policies focused on the prevention & detection of terrorist attacks against forces in the AO.  Organization: The section consists of one vulnerability assessment officer.  Tasks: The section monitors and executes assessments of subordinate organizations AT plans. It advises the CCP Commander on force protection conditions (FPCON) requirements and reporting. It coordinates the execution of specialized AT, area damage control, base and air base defense, response force, and critical site and asset security operations. The section coordinates AO terrorism threat, vulnerability, criticality and risk assessment for installations, camps and troop concentrations.

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15-24. Provost Marshal (PM) Section  Mission: The Provost Marshal (PM) Section plans, coordinates, and supervises military police operations in the CCP’s AO.  Organization: The Provost Marshal Section consists of a chief/Deputy Provost Marshall, an operations officer and NCO.  Tasks: The section accomplishes its missions through the execution of its core functions: maneuver and mobility support, area security, law and order, intelligence operations, and internment and resettlement operations. It coordinates with multinational, host nation, territorial forces, and civilian police authorities concerning support to the area of operations. The section develops, plans, and monitors the implementation of policies regarding MP operations in support of freedom of movement, security for Ground Lines of Communication (GLOCs), operational law enforcement and operational internment and resettlement operations within the AO. It monitors the current theater threat situation and exercises staff oversight of the joint security area operations mission within the AO. It conducts coordination, assessments and estimates for AT/FP requirements.

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15-25. Air and Missile Defense (AMD) Section  Mission: The Air and Missile Defense (AMD) Section provides situational awareness and expertise on theater AMD and plans, anticipates, and coordinates a response to aerial threats within the CCP’s AO.  Organization: The AMD Section consists of an AMD Officer, one C2 Systems Integration Warrant Officer, three operations NCOs, and one enlisted operations assistant.  Tasks: The section plans, prepares, executes, and assesses Air Missile Defense (AMD) operations in the CCP’s AO. The section coordinates with joint, interagency and host nation air and missile defense experts as required to enable follow-on AMD forces and an integrated AMD response to aerial threats. It assists Air Space Management and Fires planners, as required. The section gathers AMD intelligence, maneuver, and logistical graphics and control measures, as necessary. It monitors the current theater air threat situation and exercises staff oversight of joint security area operations within the AO.

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15-26. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, High Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Section 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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15-7

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 

Mission: The Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, High Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Section monitors the current CBRNE situation, and provides estimates, analysis, and coordination of CBRNE and EOD operations in the CCP’s AO. Organization: The CBRNE Section is composed of a CBRNE Operations Officer and NCO plus an EOD NCO. Tasks: The section provides CBRNE, analysis, coordination and staff supervision across the AO. It monitors sensitive site exploitation (SSE) efforts in the AO. It monitors the current theater threat situation and exercises staff oversight for CBRNE operations within the AO. The section maintains the EOD operational picture. It provides assessments and estimates of EOD requirements, and monitors the use of EOD elements within the CCP.

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15-27. Personnel Recovery (PR) Section  Mission: The Personnel Recovery (PR) Section coordinates, manages and monitors personnel recovery operations within the CCP’s AO.  Organization: The section consists of a PR Officer and Intelligence Operations NCO.  Tasks: The section coordinates and synchronizes PR operations with the CCP’s AO. It recommends personnel recovery courses of action and supports Joint PR or establishes a JPRC as required. It coordinates with the joint search and rescue center for repatriation. The section monitors the current theater threat situation and exercises staff oversight of the joint security area operations mission within the AO. It conducts near term planning, coordination, assessments and estimates for P/R requirements.

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15-28. Sustainment Cell. The CCP Sustainment Cell controls short-term sustainment operations (24/7 for up to 30 days) and initiatives throughout the AO. The MCP produces the OPORDs, normally, and the CCP focuses on controlling the execution of the plan, and assessing operations. The Sustainment Cell is composed of representatives from the G-1, G-4, G-8 and Surgeon.  Mission: The CCP Sustainment Cell is responsible for controlling short term sustainment operations (24/7 for up to 30 days) and initiatives throughout the AO.  Organization: The Sustainment Cell consists of eleven personnel: a chief, five other officers, two warrant officers, and three NCOs. The MCP provides the chief and Financial Management Officer if required.  Tasks and Functions: The cell monitors the current theater sustainment operations, and provides staff oversight of critical materials and obtains support from the civilian economy. The cell provides HR, logistics, financial, and medical technical expertise for near-term planning, coordination, and supervision and execution of sustainment support within the AO. The cell coordinates sustainment for forces in the AO. The cell provides guidance and staff supervision for transportation support. It provides oversight of distribution, retrograde and redeployment of equipment, personnel, supplies and services. The cell supports the expeditionary acquisition process through funds certification and execution, assistance, and technical oversight of all DOD resources executed in support of designated operations.

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15-29. Mission Command Cell. The CCP Mission Command Cell is the primary integrator of information operations tasks in the AO. The MCP will normally produce the OPORDs and the CCP will focus on controlling the execution of the plan, and assessing operations. The Theater Army CCP is dependent on the Signal Command (Theater) for the installation, operation, maintenance, and protection of the theater wide area network. The Mission Command Cell consists of the G7 Information Engagement, G9 Civil Affairs Operations, and G6 Signal Sections.

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15-30. G-7/Information Engagement (IE) Section  Mission: The G-7/Information Engagement (IE) section coordinates, synchronizes, and communicates theater army words and images to inform and influence the diverse population and actors relevant to the success of CCP missions.  Organization: The G-7/Information Engagement Section consists of a chief (Deputy G-7), an Information Engagement Operations/Targeting officer and a senior Psychological Operations NCO. 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Theater Army Contingency Command Post Organization

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Tasks: The section coordinates and synchronizes ongoing Psychological Operations (PSYOP) with CCP Operations. It coordinates with the Theater Special Operations Command (TSOC) for Military Information Support Team (MIST) assistance. G-7/IE coordinates the assessment of PSYOP effects with intelligence agencies. It provides direction and ensures integration of PSYOP and IO plans, programs, and policies within the AO.

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15-31. G-9/Civil Affairs Operations (CAO) Section  Mission: The G-9/Civil Affairs Operations Section engages and influences the civil populace within the CCP’s AO by executing, and assessing Civil Affairs and Civil-Military Operations.  Organization: The section consists of the Deputy G-9, one civil affairs operations officer and two civil affairs operations NCOs.  Tasks: The G-9 Section coordinates, synchronizes, and integrates the CCPs civil affairs and civil military plans, programs, and policies with strategic and operational objectives and interagency partners. The section maintains the civil affairs and civil military operational picture to assist the staff and commander in planning, preparing, and executing operations. The section provides politico-military support to other government agencies, host nations, IGOs and NGOs by coordinating and integrating joint, interagency, and multinational support into CCP operations.

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15-32. G-6 Signal Section/Operations Element  Mission: The G-6 Signal Section/Operations Element coordinates, synchronizes, and protects CCP information systems and integrates functional systems into the network architecture.  Organization: The element consists of a chief, senior NETOPS NCO, and the Spectrum Manager NCO.  Tasks and Functions: The element coordinates, synchronizes, and directs CCP G-6 signal operations. The element supports RSO&I for multinational, joint and land forces by conducting coordination with host nation communications authorities, and integrating G-6 signal support for sites designated by the GCC. It communicates network status, and manages signal resources within the AO. The element continually assesses the CCP’s ability to meet battle command and information exchange requirements. It manages contingency spectrum operations within the AO, and AO network directories (VTC, telephone, SIPR, NIPR, Coalition and Internet).

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15-33. Information Systems Management Element  Mission: The Information Systems Management Element integrates, operates, and manages theater army and joint information and collaborative planning systems in the CCP.  Organization: The element consists of the headquarters, command post support, and joint/coalition network Elements.  Tasks and Functions: The element provides staff oversight of computer network defense and manages network directories (VTC, telephone, SIPR, NIPR, CENTRIX, and JWICS). It integrates joint and Army functional systems into the AO network architecture, and provides management of wireless devices within the CCP. Wireless devices include cellular and satellite based phones, and COTS hand-held radios. This Element consists of personnel from the Joint/Coalition network section and are present only if the CCP deploys.

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15-34. Command Post Support Element  Mission: The Command Post Support Element installs, operates, maintains, and protects, CCP information systems and networks.  Organization: The section consists of a chief, two NCOs, and two junior enlisted Soldiers.  Tasks and Functions: The element, installs, operates, and maintains video teleconferencing services, administers VTC scheduling, and assists with other teleconferencing requirements for the CCP. It installs, operates, and maintains networks in support of user-owned and operated terminals for the CCP. The element implements automation policies and procedures and provides troubleshooting of services for the Theater Army CCP. It provides telephone and data directory support to the CCP. The element coordinates and synchronizes land mobile radio use

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within the CCP AO. The MCP’s Headquarters Support Section mans this element if the CCP deploys.

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15-35. Joint/Coalition Network Element  Mission: The CCP Joint/Coalition Network Element integrates, operates, and manages AO joint, and multinational information and collaboration systems in the CCP.  Organization: The CCP Joint/Coalition Network Element consists of a chief and four NCOs.  Tasks and Functions: The element plans and coordinates management of joint functional computer systems, and manages, administers, and maintains desktop visual information equipment and systems. It installs and manages Joint Battle Command Systems and Joint Functional Systems. The element develops and maintains concept of operations for coalition network systems information exchange. The element manages, administers, and maintains web sites and plans, administers, and maintains ABCS programs for the CCP. The element executes Information Assurance task for joint and Army ABCS systems within the CCP. The element administers joint/Army/coalition information systems, to include sustainment, for the CCP.

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Chapter 16

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Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff Organization 16-1. Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion (HHB) Commander and staff, with support from the three companies, assists the theater army commander and staff in the in the areas of administration, logistics, deployment, redeployment, Life Support Area (LSA) establishment, Command Post (CP) operations and area security coordination. Figure 16-1 depicts the Theater Army 5.4 Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff. The HHB receives direction from the Theater Army CoS. The HHB consists of a Command Group, S-1 Section, S-2/3 Section, S-4 Section, Unit Ministry Teams (UMT) and the Headquarters Support Company (HSC), Operations Company (Ops Co), and the Intelligence and Sustainment Company (I&S Co). The HHB provides 24/7 mess, medical, and maintenance support to CCP operations.

Figure 16-1. Theater Army 5.4 Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff Organization

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16-2. Command Group.  Mission: The Headquarters and Headquarter Battalion (HHB) command group provides C2 for the battalion staff and assigned or attached units.  Organization: The HHB Command Group consists of four personnel: CDR, BN XO, BN CSM, and a driver.  Tasks: The command group deploys selected sections and elements to support the CCP while deployed. It directs, controls, and supervises command post support operations.

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16-3. S-1 Section  Mission: The S1 Section provides administrative and personnel (Human Resources) support to all organic, assigned or attached personnel within the theater army headquarters.  Organization: The section consists of eight personnel one officer, one warrant officer and six NCOs.

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Tasks: The section plans, coordinates, and executes human resource (HR) support for organic, assigned, or attached personnel. It monitors personnel strength and projects future personnel requirements. The section provides HR policy, information, and support for organic, assigned, or attached personnel. The section performs personnel accounting and strength reporting, assign personnel, and initiate personnel actions. It performs additional tasks to include, but not limited to, awards, promotions, officer and enlisted evaluation reports, and military pay input for personnel. The section manages UCMJ functions and assists the commander with disposition of offenses. The section manages the ID card system and updates the DEERS/RAPIDS database. The section manages personnel databases such as PERSTAT, DTAS, eMILPO, and DEERS Rapid systems. Personnel are cross-trained to synchronize personnel management activities.

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16-4. S-2/3 Section  Mission: The S2/3 Section plans sustainment missions to meet CCP deployment requirements. Organization: The section consists of two officers, four NCOs, and one junior enlisted.  Tasks: The section plans, prepares, executes, and assesses sustainment support operations for organic, assigned or attached units. The section acts as a coordination hub by monitoring operations and planning, preparing, and publishing plans and orders. The section coordinates communications equipment repair. The section monitors current operations to anticipate and adjust future planning requirements for life support, CP displacement, deployment/redeployment, and CP defense requirements. The section plans, coordinates, resources, evaluates and maintains training programs. The section manages and disseminates intelligence products. It manages security clearance, physical security, and access control operations.

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16-5. S-4 Section  Mission: The S-4 Section provides technical supervision and assistance for food, property accountability, maintenance management, and deployment planning for organic, assigned, or attached units.  Organization: The section consists of an officer, a warrant officer, three NCOs and two junior enlisted.  Tasks: The section provides logistics support to organic, assigned or attached units. It develops and inspects CCP unit movement plans. It maintains organizational property books, and coordinates with DOL for non-tactical and GSA fleet vehicle support. It establishes and maintains the LSA for the CCP. The section manages the following supply classes for the battalion: I, II, III, IV, V, VII, and limited IX.

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16-6. Chaplain Unit Ministry Team (UMT)  Mission: The mission of the Unit Ministry Team (UMT) is to perform and provide religious support to Soldiers, families, and civilians as directed by the commander.  Organization: The UMT consists of an officer and a NCO. The command provides unit ministry team support to the CCP from one of the various unit ministry teams in the command.  Tasks: The UMT provides theater army personnel with pastoral care, personal counseling, advice, and privileged communication. The Chaplain serves as a personal staff officer to the HHB commander. The UMT provides essential information on troop and unit morale, quality of life matters, free exercise of religion issues, ethical decision-making, and the impact of religion on the operation. The UMT develops, implements, coordinates and tracks religious support operations. The team conducts religious leader liaison at the direction of and in coordination with the theater army command chaplain. It assists NGOs and host nation personnel in coordinating humanitarian assistance programs. The team provides direct religious ministry support for non-denominational coverage, religious retreats, memorial services, and hospitalized members of the battalion. The team coordinates with the theater army command chaplain to provide ministry for mass casualties.

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16-7. Headquarters Support Company (HSC)

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Theater Army Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion Command and Staff Organization

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 

Mission: The Headquarters Support Company (HSC) provides administrative and logistical support to the CCP when deployed. Organization: The HSC consists of four officers, twenty one twenty five junior enlisted personnel organized into a maintenance section, field feeding section, medical treatment team and unit ministry team. Tasks: The HSC provides administrative and logistic support to the CCP when deployed. The company provides essential personnel, maintenance, medical, religious support and supply services to include training for organic, assigned, or attached personnel. The company maintains arms, CBRN and supply rooms to support training and maintenance of equipment and facilities. Examples of support are leave and pass, awards, PMCS programs, and CBRN and marksmanship training etc.

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16-8. HSC Maintenance Section  Mission: The HSC Maintenance Section provides maintenance for vehicles, trailers, power generation, and decontamination equipment assigned to the HHB and theater army HQs.  Organization: The section consists of four NCOs and four junior enlisted.  Tasks: The section manages the unit’s maintenance program for organic, assigned, or attached vehicles, power generators, and environmental control units. It performs organizational level maintenance and assists in operator level maintenance. The section manages the unit’s motorpool in the field and garrison.

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16-9. HSC Field Feeding Section  Mission: The Field Feeding Section provides food service for organic, assigned or attached personnel.  Organization: The section consists of two NCOs and two junior enlisted.  Tasks: The section provides field feeding support personnel to the CCP when deployed. It submits CLI ration request through the HHB S-4. The section augments the local dining facility when not deployed with the CCP.

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16-10.HSC Medical Treatment Team  Mission: The Medical Treatment Team provides emergency medical treatment and limited ground ambulance medical evacuation support to the CCP.  Organization: The team consists of an officer, a NCO and two junior enlisted.  Tasks: The team provides medical support and Force Health Protection to organic, assigned or attached personnel. The team completes the medical portion of during the soldier readiness processing in preparation for CCP deployment. The team conducts sick call services, medical surveillance and preventive medicine support to CCP personnel while deployed. The team augments the local medical facility when the CCP is not deployed.

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16-11.Operations Company  Mission: The Operations Company provides administrative and logistical support to organic, assigned, or attached personnel.  Organization: The Operations Company consists of two officers, four NCOs and one junior enlisted.  Tasks: The Company provides administrative, logistical and training support to personnel from the G-3/6/7/9 and the Fires and Protection cells assigned to the CCP. Examples of support are leave and pass, awards, PMCS programs, and CBRN and marksmanship training etc. The company maintains arms, CBRN and supply rooms to support training and maintenance of equipment and facilities.

3646 3647 3648 3649

16-12.Intelligence and Sustainment (I&S) Company  Mission: The Intelligence and Sustainment (I&S) Company provides administrative and logistical support to organic, assigned, or attached personnel.  Organization: The I&S Company consists of two officers, four NCOs and one junior enlisted.

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3650 3651 3652 3653 3654

Tasks: The company provides administrative, logistical and training support to personnel from the G-1, G-2, G-4, G-8, Surgeon sections and the Engineer element. Examples of support are leave and pass, awards, PMCS programs, and CBRN and marksmanship training etc. The company maintains arms, CBRN and supply rooms to support training and maintenance of equipment and facilities.

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3655

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Appendix A

3656 3657

Command and Support Relationships

3658 3659 3660 3661 3662 3663

Command and support relationships provide the basis for unity of command and unity of effort in operations. Command relationships affect Army force generation, force tailoring, and task organization. Commanders use Army support relationships when task-organizing Army forces. All command and support relationships fall within the framework of joint doctrine. JP 1 discusses joint command relationships and authorities.

3664

CHAIN OF COMMAND

3665 3666 3667 3668 3669 3670 3671 3672 3673 3674

A-1. The President and Secretary of Defense exercise authority and control of the armed forces through two distinct branches of the chain of command. One branch runs from the President, through the Secretary of Defense, to the combatant commanders for missions and forces assigned to combatant commands. The other branch runs from the President through the Secretary of Defense to the secretaries of the military departments. The later branch serves other purposes than providing operational direction to combatant commands assigned forces. Each military department operates under the authority, direction, and control of the secretary of that military department. These secretaries exercise authority through their respective Service chiefs over Service forces not assigned to combatant commanders. The Service chiefs, except as otherwise prescribed by law, perform their duties under the authority, direction, and control of the secretaries to whom they are directly responsible.

3675 3676 3677 3678 3679 3680 3681 3682 3683

A-2. The typical operational chain of command extends from the combatant commander to a joint task force commander, then to a functional component commander or a Service component commander. Joint task forces and functional component commands, such as a land component, comprise forces that are normally subordinate to a Service component command but have been placed under the operational control (OPCON) of the joint task force, and subsequently to a functional component commander. Conversely, the combatant commander may designate one of the Service component commanders as the joint task force commander or as a functional component commander. In some cases, the combatant commander may not establish a joint task force, retaining operational control over subordinate functional commands and Service components directly.

3684 3685 3686 3687 3688

A-3. Under joint doctrine, each joint force includes a Service component command that provides administrative and logistic support to Service forces under OPCON of that joint force. However, Army doctrine distinguishes between the Army component of a combatant command and Army components of subordinate joint forces. Under Army doctrine, the theater army is assigned to a combatant command. There is only one theater army within a combatant command's area of responsibility.

3689 3690 3691 3692 3693 3694 3695 3696

A-4. The Secretary of the Army directs the flow of administrative control (ADCON). Administrative control for Army units within a combatant command normally extends from the Secretary of the Army through the theater army, through an ARFOR, and then to Army units assigned or attached to an Army headquarters within that joint command. However, administrative control is not tied to the operational chain of command. The Secretary of the Army may redirect some or all Service responsibilities outside the normal theater army channels. In similar fashion, the theater army may distribute some administrative responsibilities outside the ARFOR. Their primary considerations are the effectiveness of Army forces and the care of Soldiers.

3697 3698 3699

ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL A-5. Administrative control is direction or exercise of authority over subordinate or other organizations in respect to administration and support, including organization of Service forces, control of resources and

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3700 3701 3702 3703 3704

equipment, personnel management, unit logistics, individual and unit training, readiness, mobilization, demobilization, discipline, and other matters not included in the operational missions of the subordinate or other organizations (JP 1). It is a Service authority, not a joint authority. It is exercised under the authority of and is delegated by the Secretary of the Army. ADCON is synonymous with the Army's Title 10 authorities and responsibilities.

3705 3706 3707 3708 3709 3710 3711

A-6. ADCON of Army forces involves the entire Army. The generating force consists of those Army organizations whose primary mission is to generate and sustain the operational Army's capabilities for employment by joint force commanders. Operating forces consist of those forces whose primary missions are to participate in combat and the integral supporting elements thereof (JP 1-02). Often, commanders in the operating force and commanders in the generating force subdivide specific responsibilities. Army generating force capabilities and organizations are linked to operating forces through co-location and reachback.

3712 3713 3714 3715 3716 3717 3718 3719 3720 3721 3722 3723 3724 3725 3726 3727

A-7. The theater army is always the senior Army headquarters assigned to a combatant command. Its commander exercises command authorities as assigned by the combatant commander and ADCON as delegated by the Secretary of the Army. ADCON is the Army's authority to administer and support Army forces even while in a combatant command area of responsibility. Combatant command (command authority) is the basic authority for command and control of the same Army forces. The Army is obligated to meet the combatant commander's requirements for the operational forces. Essentially, ADCON directs the Army's support of operational force requirements. Unless modified by the Secretary of the Army, administrative responsibilities normally flow from Department of the Army through the theater army to those Army forces assigned or attached to that combatant command. Theater Armies usually "share" ADCON for at least some administrative or support functions. "Shared ADCON" refers to the internal allocation of Title 10, U.S. Code, section 3013(b) responsibilities and functions. This is especially true for Reserve Component forces. Certain administrative functions, such as pay, stay with the Reserve Component headquarters, even after unit mobilization. Shared ADCON also applies to direct reporting units of the Army that typically perform single or unique functions. The direct reporting unit, rather than the theater army, typically manages individual and unit training for these units. The Secretary of the Army directs shared ADCON

3728

THEATER ARMY TITLE 10 USC RESPONSIBILITIES

3729 3730 3731 3732 3733 3734 3735 3736 3737

A-8. Within its area of responsibility, the theater army may perform the following functions:  Servicing  Supplying  Training units  Maintaining/servicing and constructing/outfitting of Army Equipment  Mobilizing/demobilizing  Administering, including the morale and welfare of personnel  Construction, maintaining, repairing of buildings, structures, and utilities & management and acquisition of real property

3738 3739

A-9. Figure A-1. Normal Distributions of Army Administrative Control Responsibilities below depicts the Theater Army’s administrative control responsibilities.

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Command and Support Relationships

3740 3741 3742 3743 3744 3745 3746 3747 3748 3749 3750 3751 3752 3753 3754 3755 3756 3757 3758 3759 3760 3761 3762 3763 3764 3765 3766 3767 3768

Figure A-1. Normal Distribution of Army Administrative Control Responsibilities

ARMY SUPPORT TO OTHER SERVICES (ASOS) A-10. The following is a summary of the support requirements the Theater Army may be called on to accomplish:  Overland Petroleum Support in Wartime  Program Land-Based Water Resources to Support the GCC Requirements**  Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA)**  Provide Supply  Maintenance  Distribution  Transportation  Common User Land Transportation in Overseas Areas  General Engineering  Health Services  DoD Executive Agent for Armed Services Blood Program Office (ASBOO)**  DoD Biometrics  DoD Executive Agent for DoD’s Military Immunization Program**  DoD Immunization Program for Biological Warfare Defense  DoD Executive Agent for Veterinary Services**  Single Integrated Medical Logistics Management (SIMLM)  Patient Evacuation  Provide Treatment for EPWs and Civilians  Medical Biological and Chemical Defense Research  DoD Executive Agent for the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP)**  DoD EPW Program**  DoD Executive Agent for the Military Postal Services**  DoD Executive Agent for the DoD Customs Inspection Program**  Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore (JLOTS)  DoD Executive Agent for Mortuary Affairs Program** and Joint Mortuary 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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3769 3770 3771 3772 3773

3774

** Denotes Executive Agent

3775 3776 3777 3778

   

Affairs Program Airdrop Equipment and Supplies Communications Civil Affairs NEO

A-11. Table A-1. Army External Support to Other Services (ASOS) and Executive Agent Responsibilities will further detail the source authority, support responsibilities, and responsible agents for the different support functions the Theater Army may encounter. Table A-1. Army External Support to Other Services and Executive Agent Responsibilities

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Supply Systems

Overland Petroleum Support DoDD 4140.25

DoDD 4140.25

Overland Petroleum Support in Wartime The Secretary of the Army shall provide wartime planning and management of overland petroleum distribution support, including inland waterways, to U.S. land-based forces of all DoD Components. The Secretary of the Army shall provide the necessary force structure to operate and install tactical petroleum storage and distribution systems, including pipelines.

DoDD 4140.25

To ensure wartime support, the Army shall fund and maintain tactical storage and distribution systems to supplement fixed facilities.

4/12/2004

DoDD 4140.25

The Army shall maintain laboratories for certification testing of petroleum and related products used in ground vehicle and equipment system applications, and other than fixedwing aircraft.

4/12/2004

Army normally provides management of Overland Petroleum Support

4/12/2004

DoDD 4140.25

Jt Pub 403

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4/12/2004

4/12/2004

4/12/2004

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Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

Through 49th POL Group, plan for and execute the support of inland POL distribution to theater forces.

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

19th TSC

Land-Based Water Resources DODD 4705.01 OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Program Land-Based Water Resources to Support the CINCs Requirements Assigned as the executive agent for tactical water resource management for USFK in support of contingency operations. On order, construct, maintain, and operate permanent and semipermanent non-tactical water utility systems to support refugee. Displaced civilian and other humanitarian relief effort base camps. Monitor water quality standards throughout the theater. Provide water support to other services as coordinated in interservice support agreements. Be prepared to provide backup water support in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iraq. Identify/coordinate water support requirements beyond organic capability with predominate service at each location.

7/9/1992

Executive Agent

EUSA G4

EUSA Engineers

18th MEDCOM COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT Provide water support to US forces located in or passing through USARCENT rear areas.

Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) DODD 5160.65 DODI 5160.68 DODI 5160.68 DODI 5160.68

Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) Acquire Conventional Ammunition (upon receipt of funded programs) Develop conventional ammunition industrial base strategic plan

08/01/2008 12/29/2008 12/29/2008

Provide Inventory Management for Assigned Conventional

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Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Munitions DODI 5160.68

DODI 5210.65

DODD 6055.9

OpPlan XXX

Demilitarize and Dispose of All Conventional Ammunition SUBJECT: Minimum Security Standards for Safeguarding Chemical Agents 5.5.1. Develop and coordinate security classification guidance, as appropriate, and provide that guidance to the DoD Components to direct consistency in classification and dissemination of information related to chemical agents. 5.5.2. Develop procedures for U.S. compliance with the Chemical Weapons Convention provisions for all the DoD Components. 5.5.3. Establish requirements for safeguarding RCWM involved in an explosives or munitions emergency and/or recovered during planned munitions responses (e.g., CWM response) or other activities (e.g., range clearance activities). Serve as the DoD Executive Agent for emergency response to transportation mishaps involving ammunition and explosives; and Provide administrative and resource support for the DoD Explosives Safety Board (DDESB) Maintain capability to receive, store, coordinate and distribute ammunition using maximum throughput and containerization consistent with unstuffing capability.

12/29/2008

03/12/2007

08/19/2005

COMUSARCENT

Provide Supply

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Jt Pub 401.4

CINCPA C OPLAN XXX

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

The primary logistics-related functions of the Commander, Army Forces (COMARFOR) are: • Perform the following Army component command responsibilities: Provide management of overland petroleum support, including coastal and inland waterways, to US land-based forces of all DOD components; Provide common item and common service support to other components as required. Arrange ISAs for CIS, service support, and other logistics support. Develop procedures for implementation of common item/common service support with service components in the KTO. CIS methodology should collect projected requirements and include provisions that ensure supplies are requisitioned for all supported in country components. This support must include common-item support requirements for Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Forces, and US Agencies as identified by Service components. Plan for and support the onward movement of U.S. Army augmentation forces, and other service component forces, IAW existing policies and directives.

OpPlan XXX

Provides logistics support of RS&O for U.S. forces, vehicles, cargo and personnel. Support requirements such as fuel, messing, beddown and parking space will be required for drivers and assets at the ports, RS&O sites, and at final destinations

OpPlan XXX

EUSA/AMC coordinated preplanned supply increments of common items upon arrival in Korea are comingled and stored in Army operated supply facilities

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Responsible Agent

Date

COMARFOR

8/22/2000

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

COMUSKOREA

19th TSC

19th TSC

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Appendix A

Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

and will be available to USAF, USN and USMC elements by requisitioning through the 6 SPT CTR (MMC). Demand supported requisitions (DSS or Non-DSS) will be submitted by 6 SPT CTR (MMC) to CONUS ICP/SICC commencing NLT D+5. These requisitions will include USAF, USN, and USMC common item support and supply buildup to attain and maintain the prescribed stockage objective. Common Item Support: The Theater Army is responsible for providing Army common items support for the USAF, USN and USMC elements deployed to Korea not covered by existing ISSAs. The Army common items support has been agreed by ALCON (Ltr, HQ EUSA, DJ-P-O, 13 Feb 81, Subject: Memo of Record - Common Item Support Conference). Common item support provided by EUSA consists of the following classes of supply: I - operational rations, II - consumables/expendables, III (package), IV - field fortification/barrier materiel, V Army common ammunition, VIII medical items, and IX - repair parts for Army managed major end items. As the theater logistics manager, responsible for common item and common service support. COMUSARCENT is responsible for all theater-level Army logistics forces and other support organizations (AFSB, DLA, MTMC, and other Joint agencies) in the theater. Is responsible for the management of the Theater Distribution Management Center

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COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

to ensure theater requirements for the management and movement of resources are processed and distributed. OpPlan As executing agent, receive, store, issue, coordinate and XXX provide common items of Classes I, II, III, IV(B), and IX to other forces ashore. OpPlan Maintain the theater reserve of chemical protection clothing and XXX equipment. Procurement JCS Memo No. 37 JCS Memo No. 37 Various OSD Memos MOU with Air Force & Navy

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

Ground Mobile Forces Tactical Satellite Communications Ground Systems for Defense Satellite Communications Support for United Nations Missions (furnish supplies, equipment, services)

Black Hawk and T-7000 Procurement

Miscellaneous Supply Services SUBJECT: Roles and Responsibilities Associated with the Chemical and Biological Defense (CBD) Program (CBDP)

DODD 5160.05

(1) Coordinate and integrate RDT&E and acquisition requirements of the Military Departments for DoD chemical and biological warfare defense programs. (2) Review all funding requirements for the CBDP. b. Pursuant to Reference (f): (1) Serve as Milestone Decision Authority for CBRND programs as delegated by the USD(AT&L). (2) Establish a Joint Program

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Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Executive Officer for Chemical and Biological Defense (JPEO-CBD), reporting through the Army Acquisition Executive to the DAE, to serve as the Joint Service Materiel Developer and oversee total life-cycle acquisition management for assigned CBRND programs. (3) Designate a CBDP T&E Executive to ensure adequacy of T&E programs and infrastructure. (4) Establish a Joint Combat Developer for Experimentation for CBRND under the direction and supervision of the Director of the Joint Staff/J-8 JRO-CBRND. (5) Provide support and operational direction to the Director, Joint CBRND Program Analysis and Integration Office (PAIO).. OpPlan XXX

DODD 3025.01

Provide for billeting, messing, and medical support of transient personnel ... during other than unit moves. Emergency Water Responsibilities in CONUS

COMUSARCENT

1/15/1993

Maintenance DODI 5160.68

Manage the maintenance of wholesale conventional ammunition in support of the SMCA mission.

DODI 5160.68

Fund, on a non-reimbursable basis, and perform maintenance on SMCA-assigned conventional ammunition deteriorating from a serviceable condition to an unserviceable condition due to improper storage and handling conditions while in SMCA facilities. Develop, acquire, and maintain conventional ammunition peculiar equipment required for the maintenance of conventional

DODI 5160.68

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Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

ammunition at SMCA facilities on a non-reimbursable basis. OpPlan XXX

Provide seaport damage assessment and repair capability, port maintenance, and port development capability in coordination with COMUSNAVCENT, as required.

COMUSARCENT

Distribution Jt Pub 401.4

The primary logistics-related functions of the Commander, Army Forces (COMARFOR) are • Develop theater lines of communications (LOCs) as follows: Provide management of distribution assets and prioritize movement requirements and mode asset utilization; Provide common-user land transportation in theater to include rail unless otherwise designated by the CINC; Provide equipment load rigging support in conjunction with other Service component commands; Operate some or all water terminals in the theater in coordination with the MTMC port manager; Provide coastal and inland pipeline fuel support; Establish and operate coastal and inland waterways; Provide engineer support for inland physical network (highways and bridges). Provide rotary-wing common-user support. Maintain the appropriate automation system infrastructure to support DOD ITV requirements by providing ITV data feeds at key transportation nodes to GTN and joint total asset visibility (JTAV).

COMARFOR

8/22/2000

Transportation DODD 6055.9

DoD Executive Agent for DoD emergency response to transportation mishaps involving ammunition and explosives

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Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

25th Trans Bn will establish Movement Control Teams (MCT) to service transportation needs of all U.S. units in theater. Serves as the U.S. Theater Movement Control Agency (TMCA) providing movement management services and highway traffic regulation on all U.S. forces until closure of the TAMCA Tasks assigned US common user lift transportation (CULT) in support of US forces

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

25th Trans Bn

25th Trans Bn

25th Trans Bn

Common-User Land Transportation in Overseas Areas Jt Pub 401.5

Jt Pub 401.3 OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Secretary of the Army has single manager transportation responsibilities for land transportation The Army component usually provides common-user land and inland waterway transport Plan for the in-country distribution of dry cargo arriving at KIMHAE, POHANG, and KWANGJU Executive agency authority for all theater U.S. movement/transportation. Provide theater-level command and control for common-user water terminal operations, common-user line haul transportation, common-user waterborne transportation, and common user rail transportation. Provide or arrange for common user line-haul transportation, including wholesale distribution of bulk POL and water and aerial/water port clearance.

/9/2002

4/9/2002

19th TSC

EUSA G-4

19th TSC

COMUSARCENT

Operate Overseas Ocean Terminals Jt Pub 401.3

In-Theater Surface, Sealift, and Inland Waterway Transportation Requests

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

Jt Pub 401.5

Operate some or all water terminals in the theater in coordination with the MTMC port manager.

OpPlan XXX

Manage and operate US common user military ocean terminals in Korea

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

Serves as single Port Manager for Korea. Port Terminal Operations: The Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) is the U.S. Single Port Manager. The Combined Seaport Coordination Center (CSCC), a coordinating agency of CTMC, manages and workloads port operators in common-user seaports in CFC area of responsibility. The CSCC interfaces with the CINC's and designates Logistics Over the Shore (LOTS) commander to coordinate common-user seaport and sealift assets to support logistics over the shore operations. The Port Movement Control Teams (PMCTs coordinate intratheater line haul movement of passengers and cargo discharged at APODs. Serve as Port Manager unless CINC directs otherwise I.e. 837th MPC Provides traffic management, CONUS commercial air and surface transportation and common user ocean terminal support. Through MTMC, operate all common user seaports. Assist USNAVENT and USMARCENT in operation of all expeditionary seaports, as required.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

4/9/2002 837th Medium Port Command/MTM C 837th Medium Port Command/MTM C

MTMC

25th Trans Bn

MTMC

MTMC

COMUSARCENT

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Appendix A

Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

Operate common user seaport terminals using US military, MTMC, multinational and/or commercial sea ports and related terminal services for transit of DOD cargo, and clearance of cargo through customs based on CENTCOM established policy and procedures with HN.

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

COMUSARCENT

Miscellaneous Transportation DoDD 4500.9E

The Secretary of the Army shall serve as the DoD Executive Agent for the Military Assistance to Safety and Traffic (MAST) program

09/11/2007

Executive Agent

SUBJECT: Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA): Responsibilities of the SMCA, the Military Services, and United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM)

DODI 5160.68

(1) Coordinate with the Joint Munitions Transportation Coordinating Activity (JMTCA) for performing duties, as delineated in DTR 4500.9-R (Reference (p)), so that the JMTCA can provide decision makers with advance planning visibility. (2) Provide transportation and handling management and control for wholesale conventional ammunition to: (a) Develop and implement safe, secure, and efficient transportation and handling processes at SMCA-managed facilities. (b) Coordinate with other transportation managers to develop and execute integrated movement plans for meeting peacetime and contingency movement requirements.

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Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

(3) Coordinate movement to the point of receipt by continental United States retail customers, or to the overseas port of embarkation, in conjunction with other transportation managers. (4) Plan for and maintain a transportation and handling capability to meet projected contingency requirements. Jt Pub 401.5

DOD Single Manager for Military Traffic Management

OpPlan XXX

Manages the operation of US owned rolling stock. Fulfills U.S. unit requests for common user transportation when they become available in theater. Coastal Sealift: The Combined Seaport Coordination Center (CSCC) manages and workloads all common user coastal sealift in CFC area of responsibility. ROK Defense TRANSCOM mobilized sealift, U.A. Army Logistic Support Vessels (LSV) and Landing Craft Utility (LCU) are considered common user coastal sealift.

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

4/9/2002

General Engineering DODD 4270.05

The Department of the Army is the Designated DoD Construction Agent for the following countries: Afghanistan, Canada, excluding Newfoundland, Central America, Europe, excluding Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece, and the British Isles, Northern Eurasia, which makes up Russia and the former Soviet republics, Greenland, Iraq, Japan, including the Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa), Korea, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Middle East, including the Saudi Arabian Peninsula, Egypt, and Israel, South America, Southeast Asia, from Iran to Myanmar (Burma), Sub-Saharan Africa,

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A-15

Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

excluding Kenya and Somalia, Taiwan, Turkey.

DODD 4270.05

DODD 4270.05

Within the United States, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers or the Naval Facilities Engineering Command shall be used in the maintenance, repair, design, construction, rehabilitation, alteration, addition, and/or expansion of a real property facility for a Defense Agency or a DoD Field Activity with the approval of the Military Department having jurisdiction of the real property facility. Within the United States, the Department of the Air Force shall use the services of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers or the Naval Facilities Engineering Command for design and construction of the annual military construction program.

2/12/2005

2/12/2005

OpPlan XXX

Provide initial military troop construction support to US Forces, as appropriate. Support EAC engineer requirements beyond the capabilities of USCENTAF, USMARCENT, and USNAVCENT.

JT Pub 4-04

US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is the Army major command assigned responsibility to execute the following Army and DOD mission areas: Engineering and Design, Contract Construction (less minor construction), Real Estate Acquisition, Technical Assistance, Topographic Engineering Support, The Army’s Civil Works Program.

9/27/2001

JT Pub

The Army has extensive real

9/27/2001

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

4-04

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

estate acquisition and troop construction support capabilities.

Health Services DODD 6490.2

DODD 6205.3 DODI 6200.2 DODD 6000.12 DODD 6000.12

DODI 6480.04 Jt Pub 402.1 CINCPA C OPLAN XXX

Designate the Secretary of the Army as the DoD Executive Agent for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC), which includes the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) and the DoD Serum Repository (DoDSR) DoD Executive Agent for the DoD Immunization Program for Biological Warfare Defense DoD Executive Agent for the use of investigational new drugs for force health protection

08/24/2009

Executive Agent

11/26/1993

Executive Agent

02/27/2008

Executive Agent

DoD Executive Agent for Armed Services Blood Program Office (ASBPO) Fund for Blood Procurement from Civilian Sources and manage the ASBPO and Provide Administrative Support. DoD Executive Agent for Armed Services Blood Program Office (ASBPO) Armed Services Blood Program Office (ASBPO) Resp. EUSA will serve as the Single Integrated Medical Logistics Manager (SIMLM) (Class 8A) on the KOREAN PENINSULA.

4/29/1996

Executive Agent

4/29/1996

8/5/1996 10/6/1997

EUSA

DoD Biometrics DoDD 8521.01E

Provide for, manage, and maintain a biometrics center of excellence

2/28/2008

2/28/2008

DoDD 8521.01E

Program for and budget sufficient resources to support common enterprise requirements documentation, architecture development, materiel development, test and evaluation, lifecycle management, prototyping, exercises, records

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Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

management, demonstrations, and evaluations to include efforts at maturing viable technologies and standards. Program for and budget sufficient resources to support common biometric data management, DoDD training, operations, and lifecycle 8521.01E support. Coordinate all component biometric requirements with DoD DoDD Component members of the DoD 8521.01E Biometrics EXCOM DoD Executive Agent for DoD’s military immunization program DoDD 6205.02E

DoDD 6205.02E

Establish a MILVAX Office to synchronize, integrate, and coordinate efforts in immunization services for all DoD Components. Provide a comprehensive access point for information, education resources, and coordination of immunization-related activities for the Military Services.

2/28/2008

2/28/2008

9/19/2006

9/19/2006

DoD Immunization Program for Biological Warfare Defense DoDD 6205.3 DoDD 6205.3

Vaccine Research and Development Vaccine Acquisition and Stockpiling

11/26/1993 11/26/1993

Veterinary Services DODD 6400.4

Jt Pub 402

DOD Executive Agent for Veterinary Services DOD Executive Agent for veterinary services for all Services and the advisor to the JFS on all veterinary affairs. This mission includes the control of zoonotic diseases, veterinary care of DOD owned animals, veterinary laboratory support, inspection and examination of subsistence items for quality and, when authorized, veterinary care for animals belonging to local indigenous personnel in conjunction with nation

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

8/22/2003

Executive Agent

7/30/2001

FM 3-93

A-18

Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

assistance or other operations. Army Veterinary Corps, Navy Preventive Medicine, and Air Force Public Health provide food safety services, assuring food quality.

OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

For U.S. Forces, the US Eighth Army has lead responsibility for providing veterinary support within the Korean Theater of Operations. Provide veterinary services to other components and supporting forces no later than C030, as required. Ensure the safety of the food supply and the health care of military working dogs. Provide aerial spray for insect (vector) control within deployed capabilities and coordinate ...

EUSA COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

Single Integrated Medical Logistics Management (SIMLM) Jt Pub 402 Jt Pub 407 OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX EUCOM Directive 67-6

Single Integrated Medical Logistics Management (SIMLM) Currently, the US Army is designated as the SIMLM in Europe and Korea. Will serve as the Executive Agent and function as the central point for all component requirements for optical fabrication and repair. Ensure adequate Class VIIIA supplies for Air Force forces until Single Item manager system is established by COMUSARCENT Provide medical maintenance support. CG USAREUR will act as the Executive Agent for USEUCOM regarding the SIMLM mission. The CG USAREUR’ lead agent will (1) Operate the central theater medical materiel and distribution system. (2) Provide intermediate

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

4/26/1995 6/11/2001

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT CG USAREUR

FM 3-93

03/16/2000

A-19

Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

and limited depot level medical maintenance support to all medical activities of the USEUCOM. (3) Provide optical fabrication support for standard military eyewear requirements for all military personnel of USEUCOM. Patient Evacuation Jt Pub 402

OpPlan XXX

Army aeromedical ambulance assets may provide dedicated patient movement to and from Navy hospital ships. Provide air ambulance support to hospital ships (T-AH) as required by USCINCCENT.

7/30/2001 COMUSARCENT

Provide Treatment for EPWs and Civilians OpPlan Provide HSS for EPWs and COMUSARCENT XXX civilian war casualties. Medical Biological and Chemical Defense Research DODD 5160.05

DODD 5154.24

Secretary of the Army as the DoD Executive Agent for the chemical, and biological, defense program (CBDP).

10/09/2008

DoD Executive Agent for the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP)

Executive Agent 10/3/2001

Miscellaneous Services

DoD Detainee Program

DODD 2310.01

5.7.1. Ensure all Executive Agent responsibilities and functions for the administration of DoD detainee operations policy are assigned and executed according to Reference (b) and this Directive. 5.7.2. Develop and promulgate guidance, regulations, and instructions necessary for the DoD-wide implementation of detainee operations policy in coordination with USD(P). 5.7.3. Communicate directly with the Heads of the DoD

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

09/05/2006 FM 3-93

A-20

Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Components as necessary to carry out assigned functions. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall be informed of communications to the Commanders of the Combatant Commands. 5.7.4. Designate a single point of contact within the Department of the Army for detainee operations policy, who shall also provide advice and assistance to USD(P). 5.7.5. Plan for and operate a national-level detainee reporting center and its elements (e.g., theater and lower levels) to account for detainees. Coordinate with USD(P) to provide reports on detainee operations to the Secretary of Defense and others as appropriate. 5.7.6. Recommend DoD-wide detainee operations-related planning and programming guidance to the USD(P), USD(AT&L), USD(I), USD(P&R), the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration, the Director of Program Analysis and Evaluation, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Provide information copies of such guidance to the Secretaries of the Military Departments. 5.7.7. Establish detainee operations training and certification standards, in coordination with the Secretaries of the Military Departments and the Joint Staff. 5.7.8. Develop programs to ensure all DoD detainee operations policy; doctrine; tactics, techniques, and procedures; and regulations or 15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

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Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

1/31/2005

Executive Agent

other issuances are subject to periodic review, evaluation, and inspection for effectiveness and compliance with this Directive.

OpPlan XXX

Provide logistic support to displaced civilians, civilian internees, and Enemy Prisoners of War (EPWs) with capabilities and IAW the Geneva Convention. Establish EPW and civilian internee camps, as governed by customary law

COMUSARCENT

Military Postal Services DODD 5101.11

DoD Executive Agency for the Military Postal Service (MPS)

Manage the MPS throughout the Department of Defense in accordance with guidance provided by the USD(AT&L). The MPS shall provide efficient and responsive postal service to authorized personnel and organizations outside the United States. DODI [DoD Executive Agent] for Military 4/2/1981 Postal Services - Establish a 4525.07 support team composed of personnel from the Military Postal Service Agency (MPSA) to provide technical assistance and monitor command postal operations for all Military Services in overseas areas. Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore (JLOTS) Jt Pub 401.6

Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore (JLOTS)

11/12/1998

Joint Mortuary Affairs Program DoDD 1300.22

Serve as the Executive Agent for mortuary affairs for the

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

2/2/2000

FM 3-93

A-22

Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Department of Defense DoDD 1300.22 DoDD 1300.22 DoDD 1300.22 DoDD 1300.22

DoDD 1300.22

DoDD 1300.22

DoDD 1300.22 Jt Pub 406 CFC OPLAN XXX OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Maintain a mortuary affairs force structure

2/2/2000

Maintain the Central Joint Mortuary Affairs Office (CJMAO) and appoint a Chairman. Operate theater and CONUS personal effects depots in support of all Military Forces Establish and maintain a doctrine and training integration center for joint tactics, techniques and procedures Operate and maintain a central identification laboratory in peacetime and establish other regional identification laboratories when required to support military operations. Develop and obtain Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff approval of joint mortuary affairs doctrine and training material to be used by the Military Services. Administratively process cases considered by the Armed Forces Identification Review Board in coordination with the other Services. DCSLOG is centralized manager for human remains pouches, etc. For U.S. Forces, the US Eighth Army has lead responsibility for providing veterinary support within the Korean Theater of Operations. Implement the Wartime Mortuary Affairs Program The EUSA G4, Service Component Mortuary Affairs Officer (SCMAO) will coordinate with the SCMAO for USAFK, USNFK, and USMARFORK to provide backup general mortuary affairs support utilizing EUSA mortuary affairs assets.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

2/2/2000

2/2/2000

2/2/2000

2/2/2000

2/2/2000

2/2/2000

8/28/1996

EUSA

EUSA G-4

FM 3-93

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Appendix A

Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

EUSA will serve as the executive agent for the Concurrent return and Graves Registration Programs within the ROK.

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

EUSA G-4

Airdrop Equipment and Supplies OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

On order, provide airdrop equipment capabilities to the theater. Provide supplies, equipment, and personnel for airdrop operations to support potential resupply requirements.

COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

Other Miscellaneous Services AR 70045/AFR 400/OPN AV INST 4600 10C AR 52525/AFR 55-9 AR 11510/AFR 105.3

Port Operations Support at Arctic Designated Ports

2/20/1987

Support Tactical Air Control Parties in Support to the Army

6/6/1986

Support Weather Elements Under Army Control

4/1/1990

Non Logistical Support Communications

Jt Pub 60

The Army's responsibility includes those Defense Communications System (DCS) facilities that are assigned to the Army for engineering, installation, operation, and maintenance.

5/30/1995

Civil Affairs

DoDD 5100.1

6.6.1.2. The primary functions of the Army are: 6.6.1.2.7. To provide forces for the occupation of territories abroad, including initial establishment of military government pending transfer of this responsibility to other authority.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

8/1/2002

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A-24

Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

JP 3-57.1

DoDD 2000.13

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

In accordance with the force levels, programs, plans, and missions approved by the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Army is responsible for recruiting, training, organizing, equipping, and mobilizing units and personnel to (1) meet the CA requirements of the CDRUSSOCOM and (2) provide CA requested by the other DOD components as directed by the Secretary of Defense. Furnish to the other Military Departments, at their request and in coordination with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and USCINCSOC, U.S. Army personnel qualified in civil affairs.

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

4/14/2003

6/27/1994

Military Support to Civil Authorities DoDD 3025.01 DoDD 3025.12

DoDD 3025.15

MSCA Responsibilities in Support of Civil Authorities Executive Agent for Military Assistance for Civil Disturbances The Secretary of the Army is approval authority for emergency support in response to natural or man-made disasters, as specified by this Directive.

1/15/1993 2/4/1994

2/18/1997

2/18/1997

DoDD 3025.16

The Secretary of the Army shall assist the Secretary of Defense as the DoD Executive Agent for civil emergencies (disaster consequence management) during the consequence management phase of terrorist incidents. The Secretary of the Army shall establish and administer a standard DoD Military Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officer (EPLO) training course consistent with the policies specified in this and referenced Directives.

DoDD

Executive Agent for assisting the

4/13/1972

DoDD 3025.15

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12/18/2000

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Appendix A

Source Authority

5030.50

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

USPS in restoring and maintaining essential mail service in CONUS

Financial/Contracting

DoDI 5515.08 OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Assignment of Claims Responsibility.For Afghanistan, Albania, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, the Federal Republic of Germany, Grenada, Honduras, Hungary, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Latvia, Lithuania, the Marshall Islands, Moldova, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, Sudan, Switzerland, Ukraine, and Yemen, and claims in countries in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility not specifically assigned to the Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Navy in subparagraphs E1.1.2. and E1.1.3., and as the Receiving State Office in the United States under Sections 2734a and 2734b of Reference (d), Reference (e), and SOFAs with countries not covered by Reference (e). The United States Army is the lead agent responsible for contracting within the Republic of Korea US Army Contracting Command, Korea (USCCK) has responsibility for contract support and administration for USFK, except for contracts issues and/or administered by DCMC, Army Material Command (AMC), TRANSCOM, DLA, AAFES, DECA, and the Corps of Engineers.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

11/11/2006 US Army

USCCK

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

OpPlan XXX

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

COMUSARCENT

OpPlan XXX

Be prepared to act as USCINCENT executive agent (USExAgt)for central funding... Act as USExAgt for control and distribution of assets of US & foreign financial operations recovered during operations. Act at USExAgt for paying EPWs & civilian internees. Single-Service claims responsibility for Kuwait.

DoDI 5160.68

Coordinate LOGCAP requirements.

USAMC

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

COMUSARCENT 12/29/2008

Confinement Facilities OpPlan XXX OpPlan XXX

OpPlan XXX

Will, on order, establish a joint confinement facility in the AOR. Provide military police assets for USCENTCOM HQ internal and rear area security and USCINCENT security, as required. Serve as Executive Agent for the confinement of US prisoners in the theater and establish a joint US confinement facility as required.

COMUSARCENT COMUSARCENT

COMUSARCENT

NEO

Jt Pub 307.5

DoDD 3025.14 OpPlan XXX

Act as the designated DOD Executive Agent for repatriation planning and operations, and coordinate within the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies (as well as state and local agencies) in planning for the reception and onward movement of DOD family members, nonessential DOD civilians, US nationals, and designated aliens evacuated during a NEO. Executive Agent for Repatriation Planning and Operations NEO: Executive Agent for NEO, will control and manage the execution of NEO through the JTF-NEO and COMUSKOREA.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

9/30/1997

12/08/2003 CG EUSA

FM 3-93

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Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

Mapping, Charting & Geodesy OpPlan XXX

Provide mapping, charting, and geodesy (MC&G) to deployed and deploying forces as tasked by USCINCPAC

CG USARPAC

Other DODD 4500.09 DODD 4120.11 DODI 5040.4

DODD 5111.12

DODI 5129.47

Executive Agent for the MAST program Lead Standardization Activity for Generators and Generator Sets, Electrical SUBJECT: Joint Combat Camera (COMCAM) Program 5.4.1. As the Network Infrastructure Services Agency for the Pentagon, provide information technology services to the JCCC. 5.4.2. As the VI service center for the National Capital Region, provide visual information support to the JCCC. 5.4.3. Ensure availability of static line and free fall jump-qualified COMCAM personnel to support operational requirements. The Secretary of the Army shall Serve as the DoD Executive Agent for the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC) 5.3. The Heads of the DoD Components shall support the Center for Countermeasures as follows: 5.3.1. Identify all weapon systems and related components and provide appropriate system data to the Center for countermeasures to assist in CM/CCM T&E of these systems. 5.3.2. Coordinate with the Center for Countermeasures on the scope, depth, and schedule of weapon system CM/CCM testing activities. 5.4. The Secretaries of the Army

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

09/11/2007

04/13/2004 06/06/2006

03/18/2010

10/24/2007

FM 3-93

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Command and Support Relationships

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

and Air Force shall each attach one technically qualified officer (O-3 to O-5) to the Center for Countermeasures, in accordance with currently approved authorizations and procedures for assignment to joint test activities, to perform duties as Service Technical Liaison Officers. The Secretary of the Navy shall attach two technically qualified officers (O-3 to O-5) to the Center for Countermeasures, one from the Navy and one from the Marine Corps. 5.5. The Secretary of the Army shall, in addition to performing the responsibilities in paragraphs 5.3 and 5.4., provide administrative and logistical support and manpower at the White Sands Missile Range for the Center for Countermeasures according to an inter-Service support agreement with the DOT&E.

DODD 5515.9

4.2. The Heads of the DoD Components (other than the Departments of the Air Force and the Navy), when personnel of their components are involved in incidents generating claims under this Directive, shall, upon the request of the Secretary of the Army, assist in the investigation and processing of such claims in accordance with regulations promulgated by the Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of the Army may designate the DoD Components providing such assistance as "claims processing offices" and attorneys or other personnel of the DoD Components providing such assistance as "claims officers." 4.3. The Secretary of the Army shall, under reference (c) and on

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

10/31/2006

FM 3-93

A-29

Appendix A

Source Authority

Support Functions

Responsible Agent

Date

Notes (Quotes from Source Authority)

behalf of the Secretary of Defense: 4.3.1. Process and, where appropriate, settle claims that are filed under reference (b) and arise out of the acts or omissions of civilian personnel of the DoD Components other than the Military Departments who, as determined by the Secretary of the Army, are acting within the scope of their official duties. 4.3.2. May re-delegate the responsibility assigned by paragraphs 4.2. and 4.3.1.above, to personnel of the Department of the Army who are authorized under the regulations promulgated by the Secretary of the Army to settle claims under reference (b) against the Department of the Army. DoDD 5100.3CHANGE -2

DoDD 5160.5

SUBJECT: Support of the Headquarters of Combatant and Subordinate Joint Commands Secretary of the Army as the DoD Executive Agent for the CBDP pursuant to sections 1522 and 1523 of title 50, United States Code (U.S.C.)

03/24/2004

10/09/2008

3779

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

A-30

Appendix B

3780 3781 3782 3783 3784 3785 3786 3787 3788 3789 3790 3791 3792 3793 3794 3795 3796 3797 3798 3799 3800 3801 3802 3803 3804 3805 3806 3807 3808 3809 3810 3811 3812 3813 3814 3815 3816 3817 3818 3819 3820 3821 3822 3823 3824 3825 3826 3827 3828

Sample Army Service Component Directive Copy No. 001 HQ US Army Europe Heidelberg, Germany xx March 20xx Subject: USAREUR Directive xx-03: COMMAND AND ORGANIZATION OF ARMY FORCES SUPPORTING Joint Task Force (JTF) SOLID HAMMER (SH), xx March 200x 1. OPERATIONAL COMMAND RELATIONSHIPS a. The SECDEF has designated Commander, US European Command (EUCOM) the supported commander for Operation Solid Hammer. Commanders, JFCOM, CENTCOM, AFRICOM, TRANSCOM, SOCOM, and STRATCOM are supporting commanders; DIA, CIA, NSA, NGA, DISA, DLA, and the Military Departments are supporting agencies. b. Commander, EUCOM has established JTF Solid Hammer, with headquarters in Costanzia, Romania, to plan and conduct joint operations in Georgia as part of a multinational force. c. Commander, EUCOM, has requested and been allocated V Corps to serve as the Joint Force Land Component Command HQs for Solid Hammer as well as other operational Army units to serve in the JTF. 2. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL AND SUPPORT (ADCON) RELATIONSHIPS a. Commander, US Army Europe is Commander of the Army Service component command of Europe (USAREUR) and has ADCON of all Army forces assigned or attached to EUCOM. The Secretary of the Army fulfills his responsibility for ADCON of Army forces assigned or attached to USAREUR through the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA). b. The Secretary of the Army designates USAREUR as the Army ASCC for providing administrative control and support to the ARFOR for Operation Solid Hammer. Other Army ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs will support USAREUR as directed by CSA. FORSCOM, INSCOM, NETCOM, AMC, and HQ DA will be prepared to support USAREUR with planning in their areas of expertise; USAREUR will establish requirements through HQ DA. c. This USAREUR directive authorizes V Corps as the Army Force (ARFOR) HQs under ADCON of USAREUR to establish Task Force Condor as an Army Task Force. Operational subordination of Task Force Condor as the Army Force (ARFOR) of JTF Solid Hammer and the subsequent attachment of Army forces to V Corps as the JFLCC will be as directed through the operational chain of command. CG, USAREUR will fulfill Secretary of the Army responsibilities for administrative control and support of TF Condor through V Corps. Within USAREUR, 21st TSC is designated the support major subordinate command (MSC) for Operation Solid Hammer; other USAREUR commands and agencies will support TF Condor through the 21st TSC. d. Army TF Condor will be composed of a commander and staff as provided by V Corps. The commander of TF Condor is the ARFOR commander for JTF Solid Hammer and will exercise ADCON of all Army forces assigned or attached to that JTF through the operational chain of command. Appendix A, Task Organization contains the proposed structure of TF Condor.

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

Glossary-1

Appendix B

3829 3830 3831 3832 3833 3834 3835 3836 3837 3838 3839 3840 3841 3842 3843 3844 3845 3846 3847 3848 3849 3850 3851 3852 3853 3854 3855 3856 3857 3858 3859 3860 3861 3862 3863 3864 3865 3866 3867 3868 3869 3870 3871

e. V Corps will supplement this directive by publishing changes to the Task Organization of Army forces committed to this joint operation and such other organizational instructions as he determines are necessary. V Corps commander has the authority to organize his attached Army forces consistent with operational directives. An information copy of V Corps/TF Condor organizational directives will be forwarded to HQDA and HQ USAREUR within 24 hours after approval by the appropriate commander. By order of CG, USAREUR

APPENDIX A TO USAREUR DIRECTIVE XX-03 TF CONDOR TASK ORGANIZATION V Corps HQ (-) 2d Cavalry Regiment (Stryker) 172nd HBCT 173rd IBCT (Airborne) 12th Aviation Brigade (+) 504th BFSB 303 MEB (USAR) 95th MP Bn 5-7 ADA Bn 83d Chem Bn (attached) 94th Eng Bn (Cbt Hvy) (+) 7th Signal Bde (-) 55th Sig Co (COMCAM) (OPCON) 66 MI Bde (-) 6th PSYOP Bn (OPCON) 318th Public Affairs HQ (USAR) (attached) 350th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment (USAR) (attached) 415 CA Bn (USAR) (attached) 1st IO Cmd FST, VAT TF 21(Army Support Element) 21st TSC HQ (FWD) 30th Med Cmd DCP 16th Sustainment Brigade (+/-) 24th Trans (Port) Bn, 7th Sustainment Brigade (attached) 1st HSRC (-) 266th FMC ARSOF (ADCON) 10th SF GRP (-)

Glossary

3872 3873

SECTION I – ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AAA

Army Audit Agency

AADP

area air defense plan

ABT

air breathing threat

AC2

Airspace Command and Control

ACE

Analysis and Control Element

ACP

Army campaign plan

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

B-2

Glossary

ADCON AJBPO AEA

Area Joint Blood Program Office Army Executive Agent

AFSB

Army Field Support Brigade

AMC

Army Material Command

AMD

air and missile defense

AOC

air operations center

AOR

area of responsibility

APS

Army prepositioned stocks

ARB

Acquisition Review Board

ARFOR ARNG ARSTRUC

Army force Army National Guard Army structure message

ASCC

Army Service Component Commander

ASOS

Army Support to Other Services

AT B2C2WG

antiterrorism boards, bureaus, centers and cells working group

BCT

brigade combat team

BES

budget estimate submission

BFT

Blue Force Tracking

BUB

battle update brief

C2 CAO CBRN CBRNE CCDR CCDOR CCIR CCP CG CI

command and control Civil Affairs Operations chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosive Combatant Commander Combatant Commander’s daily operational requirements Commander’s Critical Information Requirements Contingency Command Post Commanding General counterintelligence

CID

Criminal Investigation Division

CIL

critical information list

CMO

Civil Military Operations

COIC

Current Operations Integration Cell

COMSEC CONPLAN COP COPSD CoS CPLAN

Glossary-2

administrative control

communications security concept plan common operating picture Current Operations Division Chief of Staff command plan

FM 3-93

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Glossary

CPX

command post exercise

CSA

Chief of Staff of the Army

CSC

Cryptologic Support Group

CSM

Command Sergeant Major

CUB

command update brief

CUL

common user logistics

D3A

decide, detect, deliver, assess

DART DP DCG DOTMLPF DTS

Disaster Assistance Response Teams decision point Deputy Commanding General doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leader education, personnel, and facilities Defense Travel System

DVIDS

digital video imagery distribution system

EEFI

essential elements of friendly information

EOD

explosive ordnance disposal

EPW

enemy prisoner of war

ESC

Expeditionary Sustainment Command

EW

electronic warfare

FAIO FAO FD FEMA

Field Artillery Intelligence Officer Foreign Area Officer foreign disclosure Federal Emergency Management Authority

FHP

force health protection

FMD

Force Management Division

FPCON

force protection condition

FRAGO

fragmentary order

FSCOORD FUOPS FUPLAN

Fire Support Coordinator future operations future plans

GAO

Government Accountability Office

GCC

Geographic Combatant Commander

GCCS GEOINT HA/DR

Global Command and Control System Geospatial Intelligence Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response

HHB

Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion

HNS

host nation support

HR HRC HRSC HSC

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

human resources Human Resources Command Human Resources Support Center Headquarters and Service Company

FM 3-93

Glossary-3

Glossary

I&S I&W IA

intelligence & sustainment intelligence & warning individual augmentee

IAM

individual augmentee management

ICD

Intelligence Control Division

IE

information engagement

IG

Inspector General

IO

information operations

IOD

Intelligence Operations Division

IMA

International Military Affairs

INFOSYS

information systems

INSCOM

intelligence and security command

IPB

intelligence preparation of the battlefield

IPL

integrated priority list

IPT

integrated process team

IR

information requirements

I/R

internment/resettlement

ISD/FDO

Intelligence Support Division/Foreign Disclosure Office

ISOPREP

isolated personnel report

ISR JFLC JFLCC JIIM JLOTS

Joint Force Land Component Joint Force Land Component Commander joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational Joint Logistics Over The Shore

JMD

joint manning document

JOA

joint operational area

JOPES JPERSTAT

Joint Operation Planning and Execution System Joint Personnel Status and Casualty Report

JQRR

Joint Quarterly Readiness Review

JROC

Joint Requirements Oversight Council

JSA JSCP JQO JTCB JTF JUONS

joint security area joint strategic capabilities plan joint qualified officer joint targeting coordination board joint task force joint urgent operational needs

KM

Knowledge Management

KTO

Kuwait Theater Operation

L&O

Law and Order

LNO

liaison officer

LOGCAP

Glossary-4

intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance

Logistics Civilian Augmentation Program

FM 3-93

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Glossary

M2

Movement and Maneuver

MA

mortuary affairs

MC4

medical communications for combat casualty care

MCO

major combat operations

MCP

Main Command Post

MDEP

management decision packages

MDMP

military decision making process

METL

mission essential task list

METT-TC MIB MIPR MP

mission, enemy, terrain and weather, troops available, time available, civil considerations Military Intelligence Brigade military interdepartmental purchase request Military Police

MRBN

Medium Range Ballistic Missile

MTOE

Modified Table of Organization and Equipment

MWD

military working dogs

MWR

Morale, Welfare, Recreation

NEO NETOPS

Non-combatant Evacuation Operations network operations

NGO

Non-Government Organization

NSA

National Security Agency

OCP

operational command post

OGA

other government agency

OIC

office in charge

ONS

operational needs statement

OPCON

operational control

OPLAN

operation plan

OPORD

operations order

OPSEC

operational security

ORSA OSINT PA PAO

Operations Research and Systems Analysis open source intelligence Public Affairs Public Affairs Office

PBAC

Program Budget Advisory Committee

PBUSE

Property Book Unit Supply Enhanced

PDM

program decision memorandum

PEPP

plans, exercises, programs, policy

PIR

priority information requirements

POLAD

Political-Military Advisor

POM

Program Objective Memorandum

PPBE

Planning, Programming Budget Execution

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

FM 3-93

Glossary-5

Glossary

PPBES PR PSYOP

personnel recovery Psychological Operations

RFI

request for information

RFF

request for forces

RMT

resource management tool

ROC

regional operations company

R&R

rest and recuperation

RS RSO&I

religious support Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration

RSR

resource status reports

SCD

Security Cooperation Division

SCI SCIF SDDC SGS SIF

Sensitive Compartmented Information Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility Service Deployment and Distribution Command Secretary of the General Staff strategic internment facility

SIGINT

Signal Intelligence

SITREP

situation report

SJA SJFHQ SJFH (CE) SOFA

Staff Judge Advocate Standing Joint Force Headquarters Standing Joint Force Headquarters (core Element) Status of Forces Agreement

SSE

sensitive site exploitation to be replaced by ―site exploitation‖

SSO

Special Security Office

STO

special technical operations

SWO SYSAD TA

staff weather office systems administrator Theater Army

TAA

total army analysis

TBM

tactical ballistic missile

TCP

tactical command plan

THOC TIF TMIP TPE TPED TPFDD TSC TSCP TSSCI

Glossary-6

Planning Programming Budget Execution System

theater operations company theater internment facility theater medical information program theater provided equipment tasking, processing, exploitation and dissemination Time Phased Force and Deployment Data Theater Sustainment Command Theater Security Cooperation Plan Top Secret Sensitive Compartmented Intelligence

FM 3-93

15 July 2010 (Final Draft)

Glossary

TTPs USAR

3874 3875 3876

tactics, techniques, procedures United States Army Reserve

USAMEDCOM

US Army Medical Command

USO

United Service Organizations

USR

Unit Status Report

VTER

victory over terrorism

WIAS

wartime individual augmentation system

WMD

weapons of mass destruction

SECTION II – TERMS term Definition. adversary

(joint) A party acknowledged as potentially hostile to a friendly party and against which the use of force may be envisaged. (JP 30)

alliance

(joint) The relationship that results from a formal agreement (for example, a treaty) between two or more nations for broad, long-term objectives that further the common interests of the members. (JP 3-0)

area of influence

(joint) A geographical area wherein a commander is directly capable of influencing operations by maneuver or fire support systems normally under the commander’s command or control. (JP 1-02)

area of interest

(joint) That area of concern to the commander, including the area of influence, areas adjacent thereto, and extending into enemy territory to the objectives of current or planned operations. This area also includes areas occupied by enemy forces that could jeopardize the accomplishment of the mission. (JP 2-03)

area of operations

(joint) An operational area defined by the joint force commander for land and maritime forces. Areas of operations do not typically encompass the entire operational area of the joint force commander, but should be large

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enough for component commanders to accomplish their missions and protect their forces. (JP 3-0) ARFOR

The Army Service component headquarters for a joint task force or a joint and multinational force.

Army positive control

A technique of regulating forces that involves commanders and leaders actively assessing, deciding, and directing them.

Army procedural control

A technique of regulating forces that relies on a combination of orders, regulations, policies, and doctrine (including tactics, techniques, and procedures).

assessment

(Army) The continuous monitoring and evaluation of the current situation, particularly the enemy, and progress of an operation.

assumption

A supposition on the current situation or a presupposition on the future course of events, either or both assumed to be true in the absence of positive proof, necessary to enable the commander in the process of planning to complete an estimate of the situation and make a decision on the course of action. (JP 1 02)

battle

A set of related engagements that lasts longer and involves larger forces than an engagement.

battle command

The art and science of understanding, visualizing, describing, directing, leading, and assessing forces to impose the commander’s will on a hostile, thinking, and adaptive enemy. Battle command applies leadership to translate decisions into actions—by synchronizing forces and warfighting functions in time, space, and purpose—to accomplish missions.

battle rhythm

A deliberate daily cycle of command, staff, and unit activities intended to synchronize current and future operations. (JP 3-33)

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board

A temporary grouping of selected staff representatives with delegated decision authority for a particular purpose or function.

Branch

(joint) The contingency options built into the base plan. A Branch is used for changing the mission, orientation, or direction of movement of a force to aid success of the operation based on anticipated events, opportunities, or disruptions caused by enemy actions and reactions. (JP 5-0)

campaign

(joint) A series of related major operations aimed at achieving strategic and operational objectives within a given time and space. (JP 5-0)

campaign plan

A joint operation plan for a series of related major operations aimed at achieving strategic or operational objectives within a given time and space. (JP 5-0)

center

A command and control facility with a supporting staff established for a specific purpose.

center of gravity

(joint) The source of power that provides moral or physical strength, freedom of action, or will to act. (JP 3-0)

civil considerations

The influence of manmade infrastructure, civilian institutions, and attitudes and activities of the civilian leaders, populations, and organizations within an area of operations on the conduct of military operations. (FM 6-0)

civil support

(joint) Department of Defense support to U.S. civil authorities for domestic emergencies, and for designated law enforcement and other activities. (JP 1-02)

close combat

Warfare carried out on land in a direct-fire fight, supported by direct, indirect, and air-delivered fires.

coalition action

(joint) Multinational action outside the bounds of established

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alliances, usually for single occasions or longer cooperation in a narrow sector of common interest. (JP 5-0) combatant command (command authority)

(joint) Nontransferable command authority established by title 10 (―Armed Forces‖), United States Code, section 164, exercised only by commanders of unified or specified combatant commands unless otherwise directed by the President or the Secretary of Defense. Combatant command (command authority) cannot be delegated and is the authority of a combatant commander to perform those functions of command over assigned forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and giving authoritative direction over all aspects of military operations, joint training, and logistics necessary to accomplish the missions assigned to the command. Combatant command (command authority) should be exercised through the commanders of subordinate organizations. Normally this authority is exercised through subordinate joint force commanders and Service and/or functional component commanders. Combatant command (command authority) provides full authority to organize and employ commands and forces as the combatant commander considers necessary to accomplish assigned missions. Operational control is inherent in combatant command (command authority). (JP 1)

combat assessment

The determination of the overall effectiveness of force employment during military operations. Combat assessment is composed of three major components: (a) battle damage assessment; (b) munitions effectiveness assessment; and (c) reattack recommendation. (JP 3-

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60) combat camera

(joint) The acquisition and utilization of still and motion imagery in support of combat, information, humanitarian, special force, intelligence, reconnaissance, engineering, legal, public affairs, and other operations involving the Military Services. (JP 3-61)

combat information

(joint) Unevaluated data, gathered by or provided directly to the tactical commander which, due to its highly perishable nature or the criticality of the situation, cannot be processed into tactical intelligence in time to satisfy the user’s tactical intelligence requirements. (JP 102)

combat power

(Army) The total means of destructive, constructive, and information capabilities that a military unit/formation can apply at a given time. Army forces generate combat power by converting potential into effective action.

command

(joint) The authority that a commander in the armed forces lawfully exercises over subordinates by virtue of rank or assignment. Command includes the authority and responsibility for effectively using available resources and for planning the employment of, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling military forces for the accomplishment of assigned missions. It also includes responsibility for health, welfare, morale, and discipline of assigned personnel. (JP 1)

command and control

(Army) The exercise of authority and direction by a properly designated commander over assigned and attached forces in the accomplishment of a mission. Commanders perform command and control functions through a command and control system.

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(FM 6-0) command and control system

(Army) The arrangement of personnel, information management, procedures, and equipment and facilities essential for the commander to conduct operations. (FM 6-0)

command and control warfare

The integrated use of physical attack, electronic warfare, and computer network operations, supported by intelligence, to degrade, destroy, and exploit an enemy’s or adversary’s command and control system or to deny information to it.

mission command warfighting function

The related tasks and systems that support commanders in exercising authority and direction.

commander’s critical information requirement

(joint) An information requirement identified by the commander as being critical to facilitating timely decisionmaking. The two key Elements are friendly force information requirements and priority intelligence requirements. (JP 30)

commander’s intent

(Army) A clear, concise statement of what the force must do and the conditions the force must establish with respect to the enemy, terrain, and civil considerations that represent the desired end state.

commander’s visualization

The mental process of developing situational understanding, determining a desired end state, and envisioning the broad sequence of events by which the force will achieve that end state.

command group

The commander and selected staff members who accompany commanders and enable them to exercise command and control away from a command post.

command post

A unit headquarters where the commander and staff perform their activities. (FM 6-0)

command post Cell

A grouping of personnel and equipment by warfighting function or purpose to facilitate

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command and control. common operational picture

(Army) A single display of relevant information within a commander’s area of interest tailored to the user’s requirements and based on common data and information shared by more than one command.

compel

To use, or threaten to use, lethal force to establish control and dominance, effect behavioral change, or enforce compliance with mandates, agreements, or civil authority.

concept of operations

(Army) A statement that directs the manner in which subordinate units cooperate to accomplish the mission and establishes the sequence of actions the force will use to achieve the end state. It is normally expressed in terms of decisive, shaping, and sustaining operations.

conduct

To perform the activities of the operations process: planning, preparing, executing, and continuously assessing. (FM 6-0)

consequence management

(joint) Actions taken to maintain or restore essential services and manage and mitigate problems resulting from disasters and catastrophes, including natural, man-made, or terrorist incidents. (JP 1-02)

contractor

A person or business that provides products or services for monetary compensation. A contractor furnishes supplies and services or performs work at a certain price or rate based on the terms of a contract. (FM 3100.21)

control

(Army) *1. In the context of command and control, the regulation of forces and warfighting functions to accomplish the mission in accordance with the commander’s intent. (FM 3-0) 2. A tactical mission task that requires the commander to maintain physical influence over

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a specified area to prevent its use by an enemy. (FM 3-90) 3. An action taken to eliminate a hazard or reduce its risk. (FM 519) *4. In the context of stability mechanisms, to impose civil order. (FM 3-0) [See JP 1-02 for joint definitions.] control measure

A means of regulating forces or warfighting functions.

conventional forces

(joint) 1. Those forces capable of conducting operations using nonnuclear weapons. 2. Those forces other than designated special operations forces. (JP 305)

coordination

The action necessary to ensure adequately integrated relationships between separate organizations located in the same area. Coordination may include such matters as fire support, emergency defense measures, area intelligence, and other situations in which coordination is considered necessary. (FM 6 0)

counterdrug activities

(joint) Those measures taken to detect, interdict, disrupt, or curtail any activity that is reasonably related to illicit drug trafficking. This includes, but is not limited to, measures taken to detect, interdict, disrupt, or curtail activities related to substances, materiel, weapons, or resources used to finance, support, secure, cultivate, process, or transport illegal drugs. (JP 3-07.4)

counterinsurgency

(joint) Those military, paramilitary, political, economic, psychological, and civic actions taken by a government to defeat insurgency. (JP 1-02)

critical thinking

A deliberate process of thought whose purpose is to discern truth in situations where direct observation is insufficient, impossible or impractical. (FM 6-22)

culminating point

(Army) That point in time and space at which a force no longer

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possesses the capability to continue its current form of operations. Decision-making

Selecting a course of action as the one most favorable to accomplish the mission. (FM 6-0)

decision point

A point in space and time when the commander or staff anticipates making a key decision concerning a specific course of action. (JP 5-0)

decision support matrix

An aid used by the commander and staff to make battlefield decisions. This matrix is a staff product of the wargaming process that lists several specifics.

decisive operation

The operation that directly accomplishes the mission. It determines the outcome of a major operation, battle, or engagement. The decisive operation is the focal point around which commanders design the entire operation.

decisive point

(joint) A geographic place, specific key event, critical factor, or function that, when acted upon, allows commanders to gain a marked advantage over an adversary or contribute materially to achieving success. (JP 3-0) [Note: In this context, adversary also refers to enemies.]

defeat mechanism

The method through which friendly forces accomplish their mission against enemy opposition.

defensive operations

Combat operations conducted to defeat an enemy attack, gain time, economize forces, and develop conditions favorable for offensive or stability operations.

depth

(Army) The extension of operations in time, space, and resources.

design

A methodology for applying critical and creative thinking to understand, visualize, and describe complex, ill structured problems and develop approaches to solve them.

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destroy

In the context of defeat mechanisms, to apply lethal combat power on an enemy capability so that it can no longer perform any function and cannot be restored to a usable condition without being entirely rebuilt.

direct approach

An operational approach that attacks the enemy’s center of gravity or principal strength by applying combat power directly against it.

disintegrate

To disrupt the enemy’s command and control system, degrading the ability to conduct operations while leading to a rapid collapse of enemy’s capabilities or will to fight.

dislocate

To employ forces to obtain significant positional advantage, rendering the enemy’s dispositions less valuable, perhaps even irrelevant.

early entry command post

A lead command and control Element of a headquarters designed to control operations until the remaining portions of the headquarters are deployed and operational.

end state

(joint) The set of required conditions that defines achievement of the commander’s objectives. (JP 3-0)

enemy

A party identified as hostile against which the use of force is authorized.

engagement

(joint) A tactical conflict, usually between opposing, lower echelon maneuver forces. (JP 1-02)

essential Element of friendly information

(Army) A critical aspect of a friendly operation that, if known by the enemy, would subsequently compromise, lead to failure, or limit success of the operation, and therefore should be protected from enemy detection.

evaluating

A comparison of those conditions relevant to the current operation against measures of effectiveness and measures of performance to judge progress toward desired

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conditions. exceptional information

Information that would have answered one of the commander’s critical information requirements if the requirement for it had been foreseen and stated as one of the commander’s critical information requirements. (FM 6-0)

execution

Putting a plan into action by applying combat power to accomplish the mission and using situational understanding to assess progress and make execution and adjustment decisions.

execution matrix

A visual and sequential representation of the critical tasks and responsible organizations by time or for a tactical operation used as a staff tool.

exterior lines

A force operates on exterior lines when its operations converge on the enemy.

fires warfighting function

The related tasks and systems that provide collective and coordinated Army indirect fires, joint fires, and command and control warfare, including nonlethal fires, through the targeting process.

force tailoring

The process of determining the right mix of forces and the sequence of their deployment in support of a joint force commander.

foreign humanitarian assistance

(joint) Programs conducted to relieve or reduce the results of natural or man-made disasters or other endemic conditions such as human pain, disease, hunger, or privation that might present a serious threat to life or that can result in great damage to or loss of property. Foreign humanitarian assistance provided by U.S. forces is limited in scope and duration. The foreign assistance provided is designed to supplement or complement the efforts of the

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host-nation civil authorities or agencies that may have the primary responsibility for providing foreign humanitarian assistance. Foreign humanitarian assistance operations are those conducted outside the United States, its territories, and possessions. (JP 3-33) forward operating base

An area used to support tactical operations without establishing full support facilities.

fragmentary order

An abbreviated form of an operation order issued as needed after an operation order to change or modify that order or to execute a Branch or sequel to that order. (JP 5-0)

friendly force information requirement

(joint) Information the commander and staff need to understand the status of friendly force and supporting capabilities. (JP 3-0)

full spectrum operations

The Army’s operational concept: Army forces combine offensive, defensive, and stability or civil support operations simultaneously as part of an interdependent joint force to seize, retain, and exploit the initiative, accepting prudent risk to create opportunities to achieve decisive results. They employ synchronized action—lethal and nonlethal—proportional to the mission and informed by a thorough understanding of all variables of the operational environment. Mission command that conveys intent and an appreciation of all aspects of the situation guides the adaptive use of Army forces.

general war

(joint) Armed conflict between major powers in which the total resources of the belligerents are employed, and the national survival of a major belligerent is in jeopardy. (JP 1-02)

graphic control measure

A symbol used on maps and displays to regulate forces and warfighting functions.

indicator

An item of information that

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provides insight into a measure of effectiveness or measure of performance. indirect approach

An operational approach that attacks the enemy’s center of gravity by applying combat power against a series of decisive points while avoiding enemy strength.

individual initiative

See initiative (individual).

influence

In the context of stability mechanisms, to alter the opinions and attitudes of a civilian population through information engagement, presence, and conduct.

information engagement

The integrated employment of public affairs to inform U.S. and friendly audiences; psychological operations, combat camera, U.S. Government strategic communication and defense support to public diplomacy, and other means necessary to influence foreign audiences; and, leader and Soldier engagements to support both efforts.

information environment

(joint) The aggregate of individuals, organizations, and systems that collect, process, disseminate, or act on information. (JP 3-13)

information management

(Army) The science of using procedures and information systems to collect, process, store, display, disseminate, and protect knowledge products, data, and information.

information operations

(joint) The integrated employment of the core capabilities of electronic warfare, computer network operations, psychological operations, military deception, and operations security, in concert with specified supporting and related capabilities, to influence, disrupt, corrupt, or usurp adversarial human and automated decision-making while protecting our own. (JP 313)

information protection

Active or passive measures that

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protect and defend friendly information and information systems to ensure timely, accurate, and relevant friendly information. It denies enemies, adversaries, and others the opportunity to exploit friendly information and information systems for their own purposes. information system

(Army) Equipment and facilities that collect, process, store, display, and disseminate information. This includes computers—hardware and software—and communications, as well as policies and procedures for their use.

initiative (individual)

The willingness to act in the absence of orders, when existing orders no longer fit the situation, or when unforeseen opportunities or threats arise.

initiative (operational)

The setting or dictating the terms of action throughout an operation.

insurgency

(joint) An organized movement aimed at the overthrow of a constituted government through use of subversion and armed conflict. (JP 1-02)

intelligence

(joint) The product resulting from the collection, processing, integration, evaluation, analysis, and interpretation of available information concerning foreign nations, hostile or potentially hostile forces or Elements, or areas of actual or potential operations. The term is also applied to the activity which results in the product and to the organizations engaged in such activity. (JP 2-0)

intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

(Army) An activity that synchronizes and integrates the planning and operation of sensors, assets, and processing, exploitation, and dissemination systems in direct support of current and future operations. This is an integrated intelligence and operations function. For Army forces, this activity is a

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combined arms operation that focuses on priority intelligence requirements while answering the commander’s critical information requirements. intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance integration

The task of assigning and controlling a unit’s intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets (in terms of space, time, and purpose) to collect and report information as a concerted and integrated portion of operation plans and orders.

intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance synchronization

The task that accomplishes the following: analyzes information requirements and intelligence gaps; evaluates available assets internal and external to the organization; determines gaps in the use of those assets; recommends intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets controlled by the organization to collect on the commander’s critical information requirements; and submits requests for information for adjacent and higher collection support.

intelligence warfighting function

The related tasks and systems that facilitate understanding of the operational environment, enemy, terrain, and civil considerations.

interagency coordination

(joint) Within the context of Department of Defense involvement, the coordination that occurs between Elements of Department of Defense and engaged U.S. Government agencies for the purpose of achieving an objective. (JP 3-0)

interior lines

A force operates on interior lines when its operations diverge from a central point.

intuitive decision-making

The act of reaching a conclusion which emphasizes pattern recognition based on knowledge, judgment, experience, education, intelligence, boldness, perception, and character. This approach focuses on assessment of the situation vice comparison

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of multiple options. (FM 6-0) irregular forces

(joint) Armed individuals or groups who are not members of the regular armed forces, police, or other internal security forces. (JP 1-02)

irregular warfare

A violent struggle among state and nonstate actors for legitimacy and influence over a population.

isolate

In the context of defeat mechanisms, to deny an enemy or adversary access to capabilities that enable the exercise of coercion, influence, potential advantage, and freedom of action.

joint combined exchange training

(joint) A program conducted overseas to fulfill U.S. forces training requirements and at the same time exchange the sharing of skills between U.S. forces and host-nation counterparts. Training activities are designed to improve U.S. and host-nation capabilities. (JP 3-05)

joint land operations plan:

A plan for the a connected series of joint land operations to achieve the joint force commander’s objectives within a given time and joint operational area. (JP 3-31)

key tasks

Those tasks the force as a whole must perform, or conditions the force must meet, to achieve the end state and stated purpose of the operation. (FM 6-0)

knowledge management

The art of creating, organizing, applying, and transferring knowledge to facilitate situational understanding and decision-making. Knowledge management supports improving organizational learning, innovation, and performance. Knowledge management processes ensure that knowledge products and services are relevant, accurate, timely, and useable to commanders and decision makers.

land control operations:

The employment of land forces, supported by maritime and air

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forces (as appropriate) to achieve military objectives in land domain. Such operations include deterring enemy actions, destruction of opposing ground forces, securing key terrain, protection of land lines of communication or bases, establishment of local military superiority in vital land operational areas, and the conduct of stability or civil support operations. (JP 3-31) land domain:

The land area of the Earth’s surface ending at the high water mark of the shore where terrain and people have a major effect on the movement, maneuver, and employment of joint forces. The land domain shares the Earth’s surface with the maritime domain. (JP 3-31)

landpower

The ability—by threat, force, or occupation—to gain, sustain, and exploit control over land, resources, and people.

law of war

(joint) That part of international law that regulates the conduct of armed hostilities. (JP 1-02)

leadership

The process of influencing people by providing purpose, direction, and motivation, while operating to accomplish the mission and improving the organization. (FM 6-22)

liaison

Contact or intercommunication maintained between Elements of military forces or other agencies to ensure mutual understanding and unity of purpose and action. (JP 3-08)

line of effort

A line that links multiple tasks and missions using the logic of purpose—cause and effect—to focus efforts toward establishing operational and strategic conditions.

line of operations

(Army) A line that defines the directional orientation of a force in time and space in relation to the enemy and links the force with its base of operations and objectives.

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main effort

The designated subordinate unit whose mission at a given point in time is most critical to overall mission success. It is usually weighted with the preponderance of combat power.

main command post

A command and control facility containing the majority of the staff designed to control current operations, conduct detailed analysis, and plan future operations.

main effort

The designated subordinate unit whose mission at a given point in time is most critical to overall mission success. It is usually weighted with the preponderance of combat power. (FM 3-0)

major operation

(joint) A series of tactical actions (battles, engagements, strikes) conducted by combat forces of a single or several Services, coordinated in time and place, to achieve strategic or operational objectives in an operational area. These actions are conducted simultaneously or sequentially in accordance with a common plan and are controlled by a single commander. For noncombat operations, a reference to the relative size and scope of a military operation. (JP 3-0)

maneuver

(joint) Employment of forces in the operational area through movement in combination with fires to achieve a position of advantage in respect to the enemy in order to accomplish the mission. (JP 3-0)

measure of effectiveness

(joint) A criterion used to assess changes in system behavior, capability, or operational environment that is tied to measuring the attainment of an end state, achievement of an objective, or creation of an effect. (JP 3-0)

measure of performance

(joint) A criterion used to assess friendly actions that is tied to measuring task accomplishment. (JP 3-0)

METT-TC

A memory aid used in two

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contexts: 1. In the context of information management, the major subject categories into which relevant information is grouped for military operations: mission, enemy, terrain and weather, troops and support available, time available, civil considerations. (FM 6-0) 2. In the context of tactics, major variables considered during mission analysis (mission variables). (FM 3-90) military decision-making process

A process that integrates the activities of the commander, staff, and subordinate commanders in developing an operation plan or order. It establishes methods for understanding the situation and analyzing a mission; developing, analyzing, and comparing courses of action; selecting the most favorable course of action; and producing an operation plan or order.

mission

(joint) The task, together with the purpose, that clearly indicates the action to be taken and the reason therefore. (JP 102)

mission command

The conduct of military operations through decentralized execution based on mission orders. Successful mission command demands that subordinate leaders at all echelons exercise disciplined initiative, acting aggressively and independently to accomplish the mission within the commander’s intent.

mission orders

A technique for developing orders that emphasizes to subordinates the results to be attained, not how they are to achieve them. It provides maximum freedom of action in determining how to best accomplish assigned missions.

mission statement

A short sentence or paragraph that describes the organization’s essential task (or tasks) and purpose—a clear statement of

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the action to be taken and the reason for doing so. The mission statement contains the Elements of who, what, when, where, and why, but seldom specifies how. (JP 5-0) monitoring

Continuous observation of those conditions relevant to the current operation.

movement and maneuver warfighing function

The related tasks and systems that move forces to achieve a position of advantage in relation to the enemy. Direct fire is inherent in maneuver, as is close combat.

multinational operations

(joint) A collective term to describe military actions conducted by forces of two or more nations, usually undertaken within the structure of a coalition or alliance. (JP 316)

nested concept

A planning technique to achieve unity of purpose whereby each succeeding echelon’s concept of operations is embedded in the other.

neutral

(Army) A party identified as neither supporting nor opposing friendly or enemy forces.

noncombatant evacuation operations

(joint) Operations directed by the Department of State or other appropriate authority, in conjunction with the Department of Defense, whereby noncombatants are evacuated from foreign countries when their lives are endangered by war, civil unrest, or natural disaster to safe havens or to the United States. (JP 3-0)

offensive operations

Combat operations conducted to defeat and destroy enemy forces and seize terrain, resources, and population centers. They impose the commander’s will on the enemy.

objective

A graphic control measure—a location on the ground used to orient operations, phase operations, facilitate changes of direction, and provide for unity of effort. (FM 3-90)

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operation order

A directive issued by a commander to subordinate commanders for the purpose of effecting the coordinated execution of an operation. (JP 102)

operation plan

Any plan for the conduct of military operations prepared in response to actual and potential contingencies. (JP 5-0)

*operational approach

The manner in which a commander contends with a center of gravity.

operational area

(joint) An overarching term encompassing more descriptive terms for geographic areas in which military operations are conducted. Operational areas include, but are not limited to, such descriptors as area of responsibility, theater of war, theater of operations, joint operations area, amphibious objective area, joint special operations area, and area of operations. (JP 5-0)

operational art

(joint) The application of creative imagination by commanders and staffs— supported by their skill, knowledge, and experience—to design strategies, campaigns, and major operations and organize and employ military forces. Operational art integrates ends, ways, and means across the levels of war. (JP 3-0)

operational concept

See full spectrum operations.

operational control

(joint) Command authority that may be exercised by commanders at any echelon at or below the level of combatant command. Operational control is inherent in combatant command (command authority) and may be delegated within the command. Operational control is the authority to perform those functions of command over subordinate forces involving organizing and employing commands and forces, assigning tasks, designating objectives, and

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giving authoritative direction necessary to accomplish the mission. Operational control includes authoritative direction over all aspects of military operations and joint training necessary to accomplish missions assigned to the command. Operational control should be exercised through the commanders of subordinate organizations. Normally this authority is exercised through subordinate joint force commanders and Service and/or functional component commanders. Operational control normally provides full authority to organize commands and forces and to employ those forces as the commander in operational control considers necessary to accomplish assigned missions; it does not, in and of itself, include authoritative direction for logistics or matters of administration, discipline, internal organization, or unit training. (JP 1) operational environment

(joint) A composite of the conditions, circ*mstances, and influences that affect the employment of capabilities and bear on the decisions of the commander. (JP 3-0)

operational initiative

Setting or dictating the terms of action throughout an operation. (FM 3-0).

operational pause

(Army) A deliberate halt taken to extend operational reach or prevent culmination.

operational reach

(joint) The distance and duration across which a unit can successfully employ military capabilities. (JP 3-0)

operational theme

The character of the dominant major operation being conducted at any time within a land force commander’s area of operations. The operational theme helps convey the nature of the major operation to the force to facilitate common understanding of how the commander broadly intends

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to operate. operations process

The major command and control activities performed during operations: planning, preparing, executing, and continuously assessing the operation. The commander drives the operations process.

parallel planning

Two or more echelons planning for the same operation nearly simultaneously.

peace building

(joint) Stability actions, predominately diplomatic and economic, that strengthen and rebuild governmental infrastructure and institutions in order to avoid a relapse into conflict. (JP 3-0)

peacekeeping

(joint) Military operations undertaken with the consent of all major parties to a dispute, designed to monitor and facilitate implementation of an agreement (cease fire, truce, or other such agreement) and support diplomatic efforts to reach a long-term political settlement. (JP 3-07.3)

peacemaking

(joint) The process of diplomacy, mediation, negotiation, or other forms of peaceful settlements that arranges an end to a dispute and resolves issues that led to it. (JP 3-0)

peace operations

(joint) A broad term that encompasses multiagency and multinational crisis response and limited contingency operations involving all instruments of national power with military missions to contain conflict, redress the peace, and shape the environment to support reconciliation and rebuilding and facilitate the transition to legitimate governance. Peace operations include peacekeeping, peace enforcement, peacemaking, peace building, and conflict prevention efforts. (JP 3-07.3)

peacetime military engagement

All military activities that involve other nations and are intended to

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shape the security environment in peacetime. It includes programs and exercises that the United States military conducts with other nations to shape the international environment, improve mutual understanding, and improve interoperability with treaty partners or potential coalition partners. Peacetime military engagement activities are designed to support a combatant commander’s objectives within the theater security cooperation plan. phase

(Army/Marine Corps) A planning and execution tool used to divide an operation in duration or activity. A change in phase usually involves a change of mission, task organization, or rules of engagement. Phasing helps in planning and controlling and may be indicated by time, distance, terrain, or an event.

plan

A design for a future or anticipated operation. (FM 5-0)

planning

The process by which commanders (and the staff, if available) translate the commander’s visualization into a specific course of action for preparation and execution, focusing on the expected results.

planning horizon

A point in time commanders use to focus the organization’s planning efforts to shape future events.

PMESII-PT

A memory aid for the variables used to describe the operational environment: political, military, economic, social, information, infrastructure, physical environment, time (operational variables).

preparation

Activities performed by units to improve their ability to execute an operation. Preparation includes, but is not limited to, plan refinement; rehearsals; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; coordination; inspections; and movement.

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priority intelligence requirement

(joint) An intelligence requirement, stated as a priority for intelligence support, that the commander and staff need to understand the adversary or the operational environment. (JP 20) [Note: In this context, adversary also refers to enemies.]

priority of support

A priority set by the commander to ensure a subordinate unit has support in accordance with its relative importance to accomplish the mission.

protection warfighting function

The related tasks and systems that preserve the force so the commander can apply maximum combat power.

raid

(joint) An operation to temporarily seize an area in order to secure information, confuse an adversary, capture personnel or equipment, or to destroy a capability. It ends with a planned withdrawal upon completion of the assigned mission. (JP 3-0) [Note: In this context, adversary also refers to enemies.]

reachback

The process of obtaining products, services, and applications, or forces, or equipment, or material from organizations that are not forward deployed.

reconnaissance

A mission undertaken to obtain, by visual observation or other detection methods, information about the activities and resources of an enemy or adversary, or to secure data concerning the meteorological, hydrographic, or geographic characteristics of a particular area. (JP 2-0)

recovery operations

(joint) Operations conducted to search for, locate, identify, recover, and return isolated personnel, human remains, sensitive equipment, or items critical to national security. (JP 3-50)

rehearsal

A session in which a staff or unit practices expected actions to improve performance during

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execution. (FM 6-0) relevant information

All information of importance to commanders and staffs in the exercise of command and control.

rules of engagement

(joint) Directives issued to guide United States forces on the use of force during various operations. These directives may take the form of execute orders, deployment orders, memoranda of agreement, or plans. (JP 1-02)

running estimate

A staff section’s continuous assessment of current and future operations to determine if the current operation is proceeding according to the commander’s intent and if future operations are supportable.

sanction enforcement

(joint) Operations that employ coercive measures to interdict the movement of certain types of designated items into or out of a nation or specified area. (JP 3-0)

security operations

Those operations undertaken by a commander to provide early and accurate warning of enemy operations, to provide the force being protected with time and maneuver space within which to react to the enemy, and to develop the situation to allow the commander to effectively use the protected force. (FM 3-90)

sequel

(joint) In a campaign, a major operation that follows the current major operation. In a single major operation, a sequel is the next phase. Plans for a sequel are based on the possible outcomes (success, stalemate, or defeat) associated with the current operation. (JP 5-0)

shaping operation

An operation at any echelon that creates and preserves conditions for the success of the decisive operation.

show of force

(joint) An operation designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve that involves increased visibility of U.S. deployed forces in an attempt to defuse a specific situation that, if allowed to

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continue, may be detrimental to U.S. interests or national objectives. (JP 3-0) situational awareness

Immediate knowledge of the conditions of the operation, constrained geographically and in time.

situational understanding

The product of applying analysis and judgment to relevant information to determine the relationships among the mission variables to facilitate decisionmaking.

stability mechanism

The primary method through which friendly forces affect civilians in order to attain conditions that support establishing a lasting, stable peace.

stability operations

(joint) An overarching term encompassing various military missions, tasks, and activities conducted outside the United States in coordination with other instruments of national power to maintain or reestablish a safe and secure environment, provide essential governmental services, emergency infrastructure reconstruction, and humanitarian relief. (JP 3-0)

staff section

A grouping of staff members by area of expertise.

strike

(joint) An attack to damage or destroy an objective or a capability. (JP 3-0)

support

(joint) The action of a force that aids, protects, complements, or sustains another force in accordance with a directive requiring such action. (JP 1) (Army) *In the context of stability mechanisms, to establish, reinforce, or set the conditions necessary for the other instruments of national power to function effectively.

supporter

A party who sympathizes with friendly forces and who may or may not provide material assistance to them.

supporting distance

The distance between two units

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that can be traveled in time for one to come to the aid of the other and prevent its defeat by an enemy or ensure it regains control of a civil situation. supporting range

The distance one unit may be geographically separated from a second unit yet remain within the maximum range of the second unit’s weapons systems.

surveillance

The systematic observation of aerospace, surface, or subsurface areas, places, persons, or things, by visual, aural, electronic, photographic, or other means. (JP 3-0)

sustaining operation

An operation at any echelon that enables the decisive operation or shaping operations by generating and maintaining combat power.

sustainment warfighting function

The related tasks and systems that provide support and services to ensure freedom of action, extend operational reach, and prolong endurance.

synchronization

(joint) The arrangement of military actions in time, space, and purpose to produce maximum relative combat power at a decisive place and time. (JP 2-0)

system

(joint) A functionally, physically, and/or behaviorally related group of regularly interacting or interdependent Elements; that group of Elements forming a unified whole. (JP 3-0)

tactical combat force

(joint) A combat unit, with appropriate combat support and combat service support assets, which is assigned the mission of defeating level III threats. (JP 310)

tactical command post

A command and control facility containing a tailored portion of a unit headquarters designed to control portions of an operation for a limited time.

tactical control

(joint) Command authority over assigned or attached forces or commands, or military capability or forces made available for

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tasking, that is limited to the detailed direction and control of movements or maneuvers within the operational area necessary to accomplish missions or tasks assigned. Tactical control is inherent in operational control. Tactical control may be delegated to, and exercised at any level at or below the level of combatant command. Tactical control provides sufficient authority for controlling and directing the application of force or tactical use of combat support assets within the assigned mission or task. (JP 1) tactics

(joint) The employment and ordered arrangement of forces in relation to each other. (CJCSI 5120.02A)

targeting

The process of selecting and prioritizing targets and matching the appropriate response to them, considering operational requirements and capabilities. (JP 3-0)

task

A clearly defined and measurable activity accomplished by individuals and organizations. (FM 7-0)

task organization

(Army) A temporary grouping of forces designed to accomplish a particular mission.

task-organizing

(Army) The act of designing an operating force, support staff, or logistic package of specific size and composition to meet a unique task or mission. Characteristics to examine when task-organizing the force include, but are not limited to: training, experience, equipage, sustainability, operating environment, enemy threat, and mobility. For Army forces, it includes allocating available assets to subordinate commanders and establishing their command and support relationships.

tempo

(Army/Marine Corps) The relative speed and rhythm of

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military operations over time with respect to the enemy. terrorism

(joint) The calculated use of unlawful violence or threat of unlawful violence to inculcate fear; intended to coerce or to intimidate governments or societies in the pursuit of goals that are generally political, religious, or ideological. (JP 307.2)

unassigned area

The area between noncontiguous areas of operations or beyond contiguous areas of operations. The higher headquarters is responsible for controlling unassigned areas within its area of operations.

unconventional warfare

(joint) A broad spectrum of military and paramilitary operations, normally of long duration, predominantly conducted through, with, or by indigenous or surrogate forces that are organized, trained, equipped, supported, and directed in varying degrees by an external source. It includes, but is not limited to, guerrilla warfare, subversion, sabotage, intelligence activities, and unconventional assisted recovery. (JP 3-05)

unified action

(joint) The synchronization, coordination, and/or integration of the activities of governmental and nongovernmental entities with military operations to achieve unity of effort. (JP 1)

urban operation

A military operation conducted where man-made construction and high population density are the dominant features.

warning order

A preliminary notice of an order or action that is to follow. (JP 333)

working group

A grouping of predetermined staff representatives who meet to provide analysis, coordinate, and provide recommendations for a particular purpose or function.

warfighting function

A group of tasks and systems (people, organizations,

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information, and processes) united by a common purpose that commanders use to accomplish missions and training objectives 3877

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3878

References

3879 3880 3881 3882 3883 3884 3885 3886 3887 3888 3889 3890 3891 3892 3893 3894 3895 3896 3897 3898 3899 3900 3901 3902 3903 3904 3905 3906 3907 3908 3909 3910 3911 3912 3913 3914 3915 3916 3917 3918 3919 3920 3921 3922 3923 3924 3925 3926 3927 3928 3929 3930

Reference Field manuals and selected joint publications are listed by new number followed by old number. REQUIRED PUBLICATIONS These documents must be available to intended users of this publication. FM 1-02 (101-5-1). Operational Terms and Graphics. 21 September 2004. JP 1-02. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. 12 April 2001. RELATED PUBLICATIONS These sources contain relevant supplemental information. JOINT AND DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PUBLICATIONS Most joint publications are available online: http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jpcapstonepubs.htm. CJCSI 5120.02A. Joint Doctrine Development System. 31 March 2007. DODD 3000.05. Military Support for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR)Operations. 28 November 2005. DODD 5100.1. Functions of the Department of Defense and Its Major Components.1 August 2002. Universal Joint Task List (UJTL) Approved Tasks. 27 August 2008. JP 1. Doctrine for the Armed Forces of the United States. 14 May 2007. JP 1-0, Personnel Support to Joint Operations JP 1-06, Financial Management Support in Joint Operations JP 2-0. Joint Intelligence. 22 June 2007. JP 2-01. Joint and National Intelligence Support to Military Operations. 7 October 2004. JP 2-03. Geospatial Intelligence Support to Joint Operations. 22 March 2007. JP 3-0. Joint Operations. 17 September 2006. JP 3-05. Doctrine for Joint Special Operations. 17 December 2003. JP 3-06. Doctrine for Joint Urban Operations. 08 November 2009. JP 3-07.1. Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Foreign Internal Defense (FID). 30 April 2004. JP 3-07.2. Antiterrorism. 14 April 2006. JP 3-07.3. Peace Operations. 17 October 2007. JP 3-07.4. Joint Counterdrug Operations.13 June 2007. JP 3-08. Intergovernmental Coordination During Joint Operations (2 volumes). 17 March 2006. JP 3-10. Joint Security Operations in Theater. 03 February 2010. JP 3-13. Information Operations. 13 February 2006. JP 3-13.1. Electronic Warfare. 25 January 2007. JP 3-13.3 (JP 3-54). Operations Security. 29 June 2006. JP 3-13.4 (JP 3-58). Military Deception. 13 July 2006. JP 3-16. Multinational Operations. 7 March 2007. JP 3-18. Joint Forcible Entry Operations. 16 June 2008. JP 3-22 Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Foreign Internal Defense (FID) (TBP) replaces 3-07.1 JP 3-28. Civil Support. 14 September 2007. JP 3-29. Foreign Humanitarian Assistance 17 March 2009 JP 3-31 Command and Control for Joint Land Forces, TBP 2010 JP 3-33. Joint Task Force Headquarters. 16 February 2007. JP 3-35. Deployment and Redeployment Operations. 7 May 2007. JP 3-40. Joint Doctrine for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. 10 June 2009. JP 3-41. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High-Yield Explosives Consequence Management. 2 October 2006. JP 3-50. Personnel Recovery. 5 January 2007. JP 3-57. Civil-Military Operations. 8 July 2008. JP 3-61. Public Affairs. 9 May 2005. JP 3-63. Detainee Operations, 30 May 2008.

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References

3931 3932 3933 3934 3935 3936 3937 3938 3939 3940 3941 3942 3943 3944 3945 3946 3947 3948 3949 3950 3951 3952 3953 3954 3955 3956 3957 3958 3959 3960 3961 3962 3963 3964 3965 3966 3967 3968 3969 3970 3971 3972 3973 3974 3975 3976 3977 3978 3979 3980 3981 3982 3983

JP 3-68. Noncombatant Evacuation Operations. 22 January 2007. JP 4-0. Joint Logistics. 18 July 2008. JP 4-05. Joint Mobilization Planning. 11 January 2006. JP 4-10. Operational Contract Support. 17 October 2008.JP 5-0. Joint Operation Planning. 26 December 2006. JP 6-0. Joint Communications System. 20 March 2006. ARMY PUBLICATIONS Most Army doctrinal publications are available online: https://akocomm.us.army.mil/usapa/doctrine/. Army regulations are produced only in electronic media. Most are available online: https://akocomm.us.army.mil/usapa/epubs/index.html AR 10-87. Army Command, Army Service Component Commands, and Direct Reporting Units. 4 September 2007. AR 12-1. Security Assistance, International Logistics, Training, and Technical Assistance Support Policy and Responsibilities. 24 January 2000. AR 34-1. Multinational Force Compatibility. 6 January 2004. AR 350-1. Army Training and Leader Development. 3 August 2007. AR 360-1. The Army Public Affairs Program. 15 September 2000. AR 715-9, Contractors Accompanying the Force. 2 March 2007. FM 1. The Army. 14 June 2005. FM 1-0, Human Resources Support FM 1-01, Generating Force Support for Operations. 2 April 2008 FM 1-06, Financial Management Operations FM 2-0 (34-1). Intelligence. 17 May 2004. FM 3-0, Operation. 27 February 2008. FM 3-0.1, The Modular Force. 28 January 2008. FM 3-05.202 (31-20-3). Special Forces Foreign Internal Defense Operations. 2 February 2007. FM 3-05.40 (41-10). Civil Affairs Operations. 29 September 2006. FM 3-05.401. Civil Affairs Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures. 5 July 2007. FM 3-06. Urban Operations. 26 October 2006. FM 3-07. Stability Operations and Support Operations. 20 February 2003. (When revised, FM 3-07 will be republished as Stability Operations.) FM 3-13 (100-6). Information Operations: Doctrine, Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures. 28 November 2003. FM 3-24. Counterinsurgency. 15 December 2006. FM 3-37, Protection FM 3-39, Military Police Operations, 12 February 2010. FM 3-39.40, Internment and Resettlement Operations, 16 February 2010 FM 3-50.1. Army Personnel Recovery. 10 August 2005. FM 3-61.1. Public Affairs, Tactics, Techniques and Procedures. 1 October 2000. FM 3-90. Tactics. 4 July 2001. FM 3-92. Corps, Operations (DRAG) August 2009. FM 4-0, . Sustainment. 29 April 2009. FM 4-01.011 (55-9, 55-65). Unit Movement Operations. 31 October 2002. FM 4-91. Army Field Support Brigade (DRAG draft) FM 4-92. Contracting Support Brigade, 12 February 2010. FM 4-94, Theater Sustainment Command. 12 February 2010. FM 5-0 The Operations Process, 26 March 2010. FM 5-19 (100-14). Composite Risk Management. 21 August 2006. FM 6-0. Mission Command: Command and Control of Army Forces. 11 August 2003. FM 6-20-10. Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for the Targeting Process. 8 May 1996. FM 6-22 (22-100). Army Leadership. 12 October 2006. FM 7-0 (25-100). Training the Force. 22 October 2002. FM 7-1 (25-101). Battle Focused Training. 15 September 2003. FM 7-15. The Army Universal Task List. 27 February 2009

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3984 3985 3986 3987 3988 3989 3990 3991 3992 3993 3994 3995 3996 3997 3998 3999 4000

FM 27-10. The Law of Land Warfare. 18 July 1956. FM 46-1. Public Affairs Operations. 30 May 1997. (When revised, FM 46-1 will be republished as FM 3-61.) FM 100-8. The Army in Multinational Operations. 24 November 1997. (When revised, FM 100-8 will be republished as FM 3-16.) FM 100-17-1. Army Pre-Positioned Afloat Operations. 27 July 1996. FM 100-17-2. Army Pre-Positioned Land. 16 February 1999. FMI 3-0.1. The Modular Force. 28 January 2008. (The doctrine in FMI 3-0.1 will be incorporated into a revised FM 3-90, FM 3-91, and publications addressing specific echelons and organization types.) FMI 3-35 (FMs 3-35.4, 100-17, 100-17.-3, 100-17-5). Army Deployment and Redeployment. 15 June 2007. FMI 5-0.1. The Operations Process. 31 March 2006. OTHER PUBLICATIONS National Military Strategy of the United States of America. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. 2005. ATTP 4-10. Operational Contract Support Tactics, techniques, and Procedures (Approval Draft). ATTP 3-92.2 Digital LNO Detachments (TBP)

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